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  Columnist: Peter Fotis Kapnistos

Image credit: sxc.hu

Cosmic blueprints and the fall of faith


Posted on Saturday, 17 January, 2009 | 2 comments
Columnist: Peter Fotis Kapnistos


A Fictitious Shortfall Story - One chilly English winter, a month-long advertising campaign displayed gigantic signs on buses. “There’s probably no Richard Dawkins,” the advertisements said. “Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.” This was, of course, the dumbest thing I had ever seen on the side of a bus. How could anyone suppose that the renowned evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins doesn’t exist? “The statement in the adverts cannot be substantiated,” I angrily protested to a bus driver. But he coolly replied that the existence of Dawkins was as likely as the tooth fairy:

“Richard Dawkins is a mythical invention of the Big Brother state — a legendary figure, just like James Bond,” the bus driver calmly uttered. “He’s as fictitious as John Bull, Paul Bunyan, or any other star of political tall tales.”

The offensive buses were rolling out across the country in cities including London, Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow, Edinburgh, York, Leeds and elsewhere, as well as parts of Devon.

“Good grief, you don’t really expect me to believe that rubbish, do you?” I fretfully inquired.

“Have you ever actually met Richard Dawkins?” the bus driver turned and looked straight at me.

“Why, no.” I replied. “But surely there are proofs. What about all the people that did meet him?”

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Libby Purves, a journalist for the London Times, perhaps summed up the bus driver’s radical mind-set when she wrote, “I had made a resolution not to type the words ‘Richard Dawkins’ ever again. Last time I tried remonstrating, quite mildly, with that honest atheist, he went ape and accused me of acquiring my views ‘over canapés’ in ‘Islington and Hampstead Garden Suburb.’ As a peace-loving woman I told my computer to issue a siren alert if ever I got as far as ‘Dawk —.’”

“Merely ontological arguments,” the bus driver continued his heated outburst. “St Augustine couldn’t prove that a Dawkins exists and neither can you. Oh sure, some people think there’s a great deal of evidence for a Dawkins — though presumably only the one that they believe in. One woman thought that Dawkins wrote ‘Oliver Twist.’ Another man told me that Dawkins was the discoverer of black holes. You see? They believe whatever they fancy. Don’t forget that it was Dawkins himself who purportedly said he does not subsist in eternity. Case closed. I do not believe in a personal Dawkins. As for the people who allegedly met Richard Dawkins, how many times did you get to sit on Santa Claus’ lap? How did you take it when you finally grew up and learned the truth?”

“So — you think that Richard Dawkins is just a show?”

“That’s right,” the driver leaned forward on his steering wheel. “A careless masquerade of actors and computer generated graphics. Just like Nicolas Bourbaki.”

“What did you just say?” I quickly interjected. “What do you know about Nicolas Bourbaki?”

Who in Fact is Nicolas Bourbaki?

A re-establishment of the analytical method modeled on Euclid’s geometry — by Nicolas Bourbaki. New axioms of formal logic — formulated by Nicolas Bourbaki. Chaotic patterns unraveled as well-defined structures — thanks to the achievements of Nicolas Bourbaki. Without a doubt, Nicolas Bourbaki has published what is perhaps today’s leading information pool on mathematical structures (40 published volumes). But just who is Nicolas Bourbaki?

Nicolas Bourbaki is the collective pseudonym of a group of mathematicians centered in Paris, who since 1939 have created an influential encyclopedia based on mathematical structures. The Bourbaki group endeavors to determine new rules of the established subject matter and to liberate mathematics from the study of traditional structures. The organization and its membership became one of the greatest enigmas of 20th century mathematics.

It appears that scores of mathematicians have been altruistically using the same pseudonym all these years in a number of scholarly information banks. Or have they? Another “up in the air” adaptation is that Nicolas Bourbaki may not be an invented personage, but perhaps represents an extraterrestrial presence, and that alien technology has been entering our academic studies since the Second World War — without raising too many eyebrows.

Did Moses use alien technology to part the Red Sea? According to Marshall Masters, a former CNN science feature producer, “newly-revealed historical accounts” imply that Moses used an advanced technology of alien design. These Egyptian accounts purportedly also foretell an end to life, as we know it, by a coming celestial event. The key to surviving this cataclysm will be the “connection between you and the Creator.” Yet some leading scientists caution us that we should not even attempt to establish a bond with the Creator, unless we are crazy. But when it comes right down to it — what’s the harm in it?

Reports of alien technology are often associated with Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Since 1947, the year of the famous Roswell crash, there have been rumors that the US government has stored debris and artefacts from crash flying saucers, and even bodies of alien crew members. In a classified document from July 1947, then Director of the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover demanded that the US military give the FBI access to the “crashed discs.”

Wright-Patterson is most well known for its connection to the Roswell crash, although links can be made to other crash retrievals. Several eyewitness accounts of military personnel and even civilian workers who handled debris from the Roswell crash, and saw bodies of creatures not of our world, give us a very plausible Wright-Patterson connection to the study of alien technology and physiology.
(Billy Booth, “Wright-Patterson AFB & Alien Technology,” About.com)

In 2007, Paul Hellyer, A former Canadian defence minister said that advanced technology from extraterrestrial civilizations offers the best hope to “save our planet” from the perils of climate change.
“We need to persuade governments to come clean on what they know,” he said. “Some of us suspect they know quite a lot, and it might be enough to save our planet if applied quickly enough.”
(Chris Lackner, “Alien technology the best hope to ‘save our planet:’ ex-defence boss,” The Ottawa Citizen, February 28, 2007)

Most scientists today say they have no need of a God. Yet they have found a suitable replacement, which they call “Nature” as an occasionally personified pseudo-deity. Nature has fixed laws, and to deny the laws of nature is regarded as the epitome of absurdity. Nature renders causes. Nature selects, nurtures, heals, preserves, and does countless other things that the human mind simply cannot. Yet despite all that, it is not allowed for nature to be “smart.” Nature supposedly acts randomly but becomes self-organizing after many millions of years of progression. Does that mean that nature will eventually become intelligent? It should, theoretically. But many scientists still can’t stomach the idea of intelligent design because it opens the door to religion — or the belief that nature is a “holy spirit” with a divine plan moving toward higher goals of awareness.

Needless to say, the recent arrival of computers and artificial intelligence is changing the minds of some researchers. They are starting to suggest that nature acts like a living supercomputer with an established purpose. The laws of nature and the formula for life were perhaps not random accidents but firmly fixed into the original quantum state at the moment of creation. Within this framework, to suppose that life appeared by chance becomes rather superstitious. But terrestrial biologists have two good reasons to turn their backs on this brilliant line of reasoning: jobs and money. As a result, the stirring new facts of astrobiology — that life originates in space — are not being taught in our schools.

Look Out For Amazing Symmetries

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One of the amazing symmetries of anatomy is how the human reproductive molecules transfer through a straight and narrow genital aperture called the “os.” It is a vertical line-like opening in males and horizontal in females. When the vertical line meets the horizontal, the union of opposites forms a rather precise cross. Indeed, the cross of sexual love has been recognized as a symbol of marriage since ancient times, almost certainly from the age of Egyptian medical learning. Yet in our days some people find it highly offensive, for no other reason than petty peer pressure. In fact, entire peoples have at times been commanded to shun the cross and treat it as a sign of naïve trickery.

For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God. (1 Corinthians 1:18)

Modern science has also backed away from the basic Egyptian logic. Some cynical physicians, it now appears (after the advance of fascism), would rather transmute “os” diagrams in key anatomy textbooks than allow the cross of love to be fully acknowledged. They are alarmed that it may put forward a discreet suggestion for modern-day teenagers to observe the cross with deep personal fondness and connect it with meaningful sex. It certainly distracts from the porno industry and places the hidden significance of “magical stories” into a subject of gratification generally assumed to be devoid of any apparent sense. Without doubt, it exerts a strong psychological attraction when honestly contemplated.

Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it. (Matthew 7:13-14)

On the whole, serious students of child development conclude that far-fetched magical stories play an important part in the developing mental life of young children; and that normal children easily distinguish stories from reality. When, aged three, you talk to your teddy bear, you do not really expect an answer. But it’s still fun. When you tremble with fear at the wolf’s approach, safe on your mother’s lap, you are preparing yourself to face real fears and trials with calm. Healthy children enjoy sentences beginning “Let’s pretend..” Some of their pretences are bloodcurdling, but a normal child knows what’s real. “Bang, you’re dead,” said one of mine, adding “Not really dead, just bang dead.”
(Libby Purves, “Children need to be sprinkled with fairy dust,” The Times, October 27, 2008.)

The 21st century launched a sweeping epoch of space exploration. Extraordinary lights in the skies and flying luminous objects were witnessed and photographed by countless citizens everywhere, including astronauts. While leading intellectuals of the world took pride in enlightened democracy and the freedom of belief, they craftily allowed dominant researchers to discriminate against faith in a universal doctrine –– as if scientists were somehow “set apart” from democracy and belonged to a special following that could brashly prop up drastic ideas concerning race, genetics, and survival. When ordinary people began to ask if the mystifying aerial events had something to do with religious convictions or the bible, the elitists responded with hidebound defiance and unreserved “Merkabah denial.”

Rudeness soon became a permissible part of modern science. Leading technological websites conveyed countless insults and unscrupulous smears directed towards those who proposed new ideas beyond the commonplace. A preferred practice was to accuse competitors of being emotionally disturbed. The language they utilized became severe and shameful to say the least. Ironically, no other subject of human learning had ever allowed for such degraded abuses to be shed upon regular opponents — certainly not within the realms of diplomacy or business.

It is a well-known fact that Nazi rocket scientists like Wernher von Braun developed modern space technology. Klaus Barbie, known as the “Butcher of Lyon,” and others like him were employed by British and American intelligence agencies. Apparently their insolence was also taken over. It soon became tolerable to diagnose scientific rivals as psychotic and to then administer the suitable treatment — in the form of sleazy humiliation. These are the proud professors of contemporary science, supposedly bound by the Hippocratic oath. Yet their hearts seem won over by the pledge of Josef Mengele — the Auschwitz doctor who allegedly owned “major properties” in the US and had reportedly been sighted in Florida and New Orleans.

“Come,” Said the Serpent. And the Serpent Came

When modern science turned against faith, it deliberately attacked the “Humanities.” Physicists, chemists, and biologists all of a sudden made disturbing accusations critical of subjects they have absolutely no schooling in. The humanities are academic disciplines that examine cultural studies such as anthropology, literature, philosophy, religion, art, and music. All of these branches of learning make euphoric citations to faith — and have been doing so since the dawn of the written word.

It is ironic that skeptics sometimes call themselves “humanists,” creating the false impression that they are experts in the subject of humanities. Nothing could be farther from the truth. For, if they have their way, most of our great works of human inspiration will be consigned to the flames. It is perhaps a terrible thing to not be able to “feel” the quintessence of the human dream. It is even more terrible when a few persons who hate mankind try to repress the creative force of pious motivation.

The nasty enterprise to turn science against faith began way before the Second World War. Near the beginning of the 20th Century, The US Secret Service captured a number of criminals who were intentionally embedding larvae into America’s agricultural crops. The culprits were arrested with numerous jars containing larval bodies and small tweezers used to implant parasites into fruits and vegetables. At that time, it was thought that those misdeeds were committed in order to manipulate the market value of foodstuff. But an out of the ordinary scheme would soon unfold.

The findings of Louis Pasteur were being applied to US institutions in those days, and an elite group of villains understood that their time was running out. It had been known that dangerous parasites were spread through uncooked meat such as beef and pork. But it was unexpectedly “discovered” that the most hideous parasite known to science was picked up by eating — a bean. The familiar “jumping bean” contains the egg of a small moth. It is the moth’s larva that makes the bean jump.

However, the most horrible parasite recognized by science is not a moth. Yet to this day, there persists a campaign of silence to suggest that it is. A privileged group of villains had gained some extra time — a century in fact — and the common plate of “prison beans” became the ideal cover-up for the parasite of cannibalism. It would be treated like dandruff in every courtroom.

They found her body in the early hours of the morning. The little girl had been missing for several days. According to the autopsy, she had been strangled and sexually abused. Teeth marks were found in parts of her body. This was only one case among the many hundreds annually reported throughout the world. Forensic odontology is the new dental science of identifying criminals by the teeth marks left in their victims’ bodies.

During the Middle Ages, the fiendish dragon-serpent was also known as the “wyrm” (or helminth). In modern times, the zoologist who pioneered studies in this field was E. C. Faust.

Goethe’s Faust (or Faustus) is the protagonist of a classic German legend who makes a pact with the Devil. But E. C. Faust’s 1949 “Human Helminthology” is a standard manual for physicians, sanitarians and medical zoologists.

Research in the 1950s by Dr. Roblis of Mexico City suggests that up to a third of the world’s population may be secondary hosts, unknowingly nursing flatworm larva cysts in their bodies. The main areas of cyst infection are usually the thighs and upper arms. The secondary host is the prey. Larva cystation in mammals is sometimes called “the measle.”

Scientists in the former Soviet Union disclosed that the “wings or fins” of advanced endoparasites are in fact enlarged suction cups functioning somewhat like lips that suck or form a molecular bond with the interior of the primary host’s intestines. The primary host is the predator. The eerie life cycle of this parasitic serpent has nothing to do with a bean. It relies on human hemorrhage or bleeding — and the eating of human blood.

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Whatsoever soul it be that eateth any manner of blood, even that soul shall be cut off from his people.
( Leviticus 7:27)

The adult flatworm can grow to lengths of over forty feet in the abdomen of the primary host. It can also reproduce through a biological asexual process known as “binary fission,” literally splitting itself in two parts. The damaging psychological aspect of “having a tail” is reflected in the many memorable myths referring to the primary host as a demon or devil. Keep in mind that due to the nature of this hideous serpent, primary hosts will usually not seek medical treatment. The first question they would be asked is: What did you eat? And the truthful answer would constitute a criminal confession or blasphemy against the Holy Ghost: Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. (Matthew 12:31)

Therefore, the primary hosts will generally not ask for medical care but rather try to mask and deal with it themselves. Some may gravitate toward secret societies that pay homage to crypts, such as the church of Satan, or attempt to elevate the flatworm into an object of unstable virtue (i.e., Vermis Mysteriis or even the comical Flying Spaghetti Monster). A probable outcome is bestiality — an ailing ritual that ancients often described as the ruin of the soul.

The beast that thou sawest was, and is not; and shall ascend out of the bottomless pit, and go into perdition: and they that dwell on the earth shall wonder, whose names were not written in the book of life from the foundation of the world, when they behold the beast that was, and is not, and yet is. (Revelation 17:8)

During Roman times, the cult of Abraxas was a textbook example of how violent soldiers attempted to present their syndrome as a form of divine magic or an enchanted quality. Lacking the knowledge of Pasteur, it was rather simple for Rome’s dogs of war to portray themselves as satyrs. The pagan god Abraxas was depicted as a soldier with two tails, a probable reference to binary fission or the mating season of the human flatworm.

Mischievously pleased, the man with a tail stood delighted by the brutal beast within, more ancient than the shark. Coiled around his ugly knee, a winged serpent writhed with loathsome scales, stinking horns, and filthy hooks — the broken pieces of his soul. A stout cord reached far back in time, the archaic root of infectious disease and every way of death. Six hundred candlesticks burned their pale and sickly lights, smoldering shadows around the outline of the foul hierophant who wore his coat of lion’s hair and goat’s horn mask in a catacomb of skulls.


Around him, letters were spread wide-open, lost scrolls of long ago, before the fall of ancient Rome. The unsightly hierophant made the sounds of amusement and scorn, reading here and teasing there, but always laughing loudly to get rid of his grotesque humiliation and villainous embarrassment. For the coming of the flatworm satanás is like the growing of a mushroom — fast, insidious, almost supernatural. In the morning, it will be done.

In our age, doctors and psychologists are dismayed at a deep-rooted trend known as “clinical vampirism.” According to Bobbi Jo O’Neal, a deputy coroner for the Charleston County Coroner’s Office in Charleston, S.C., the popularity of vampire media stars can lead some people, teenagers in particular, down a dangerous road:

Clinical vampirism groups some of the most shocking pathological behaviors observed. It is one of the few pathological manifestations that blends myth and reality in dramatic fashion and contains many possible elements including schizophrenia, psychopathic and perverse features. Vampirism and sexual behavior are clearly linked. The “love bite,” which is considered normal and a fairly common sign of affection, should be an interesting topic of discussion among sexual assault nurses examiners (SANEs) and other investigators who examine bite marks.

For many teenagers who become involved in these activities, there can be confusion when myth and reality are blended. To investigate these cases thoroughly, we must first realize that the practice exists and where to turn for assistance.

Paranormal writer Chris Holly recently conducted Internet interviews with clinical vampires on various chat boards. She conversed with “sanguine vampires” who need to drink blood in order to feel they can live normal healthy lives. “They feel that the blood gives them a certain energy that they do not get otherwise. I have read on the Internet that this type of vampire will drink blood from other humans, or some may use animal blood, while others have been known to drink their own blood.” She was shocked by what she discovered and wrote: “This subject was the most difficult I have ever had to investigate, deal with as far as interviews and write. I do not plan to write any follow-ups or to ever dig deeper into this subject matter.”


The Beginning… And Now The End

How did a flatworm parasite first enter the human bloodstream? How will its life cycle end? Researchers today believe that the AIDS virus epidemic began with the bite of a green monkey. It is not impossible therefore that a flatworm first infected its human host during prehistoric times from the bite of a reptile — provided the appropriate helminth larvae were present on the beak or fangs of the reptile. At least that is what some of our oldest-known narratives tell us:

And the LORD God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat. (Genesis 3:13)

It appears that the serpent probably “knew” the fruit was safe to eat because the serpent bites first. Somewhere in our prehistory we acquired the eating habits of reptiles, although we were perhaps created to be vegetarians. In the course of our fallen faith, our ancestors became cannibals.

When we began our very first NASA space missions, monkeys and dogs were sent into space before humans. Those among us who believe in extraterrestrials may want to consider the possibility that aliens also sent animals en route to the Earth before any intelligent extraterrestrials arrived here. What kind of animals? Some leading astrobiologists are somewhat certain that worm larvae can actually survive in space under certain conditions. Perhaps Reptilian Greys (or fallen angels) have a hidden purpose in their so-called attempts to incubate biological samplings in the bodies of abducted humans. According to some reports, their eating habits are “disgusting” and could represent a strange new twist to our terrestrial food chain.

And he said unto them, I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven. (Luke 10:18)

Former BBC reporter David Icke has lectured for years about an elite group of villains that control the world’s resources. He describes them as reptilians, a point that could prove to be relevant to this report. Shape-shifting men with tails are not the products of mythology but biological facts according to the research of E. C. Faust and others. They have been around for millennia and, as all organized crime families are known to do, they initiate their own children into the secrets of their power. Less than a thousand half-humans once sat above the law and controlled the entire world’s finances. For the past century they confidently hid behind an elegant bean fraud. But now their time is up. We can now match the DNA of cysts found in secondary host victims to the DNA of adult parasite primary hosts. This is “hard copy” evidence for every court of law. Don’t be alarmed if you see new-fangled x-ray machines in major airports and public places. Instead, be thankful for the “change we can believe in.” The coming of the flatworm satanás cannot overshadow the triumph of the human dream.

And they had tails like unto scorpions, and there were stings in their tails: and their power was to hurt men five months. (Revelation 9:10)

Perhaps the reptilian Greys have finally painted themselves into a deep corner. Are Men in Black here to observe the last days of a fallen sub-species? It is unfortunate that famous biologists like Richard Dawkins have nothing to tell us about E.C. Faust and his amazing discoveries. Dereliction of duty? They are way too busy campaigning against God.

Who was Jack the Ripper’s first victim? No one knows for sure. But retired homicide detective Trevor Marriott thinks Jack the Ripper may have committed his first murder a quarter of a century before the first official Ripper case. Mr. Marriott said: “The organs were not removed by the killer at the crime scenes, but by person or persons unknown for medical research at some point between the bodies being removed from the crime scenes and the post-mortems taking place some 12 hours later.” (“Did Jack The Ripper Kill More?” Sky News, September 6, 2008)

Winter, 1858. Dr Beagle’s coach arrived shortly after midnight. Behind him walked his helper thugs, hooligans wearing masks and black hoods. The old warehouse was dark and deserted, except for the patient, a middle-aged woman stripped naked. Dr. Beagle was the grisly abortionist of London. If Scotland Yard could capture him, his fate would be the gallows. But he always worked fast — and hastily on the filthy factory floors. Dr Beagle had collected enough embryos to present his case to the Royal Academy. But he could never disclose his dreadful medical procedures in detail to his distinguished peers.

Instead, Dr Beagle would escape for a prolonged journey at sea, to distant islands alive with unfamiliar animals. There, he would have time to study his embryo specimens and conclude that humans evolved in various stages from the animals. One embryo resembled a fish, another a pig, until at last a fully formed human being emerged. Of course, he knew that this process only took nine months in a space as small as a bucket of water — the female womb. But he would have to put forward a falsehood and claim that it took millions of years in an area as large as the whole Earth. It was a small inaccuracy, but a necessary one in order to avoid the gallows.
The evolutionary study of embryos reached a peak in the late 1800s thanks to the labors of Ernst Haeckel, who believed that embryonic growth was actually a record of evolutionary history. The single cell corresponded to amoeba-like ancestors, developing in time into a sea squirt, a fish, and so on. Haeckel invented a name for the process — “the Biogenetic Law.” But the truth is that the development of embryos does not fit into the succession that Haeckel claimed. Haeckel’s final disgrace came with the rise of genetics:

As a result, the Biogenetic Law was abandoned, and its fall freed scientists to appreciate the full range of embryonic changes that evolution can produce — an appreciation that has yielded spectacular results in recent years as scientists have discovered some of the specific genes that control development.

(Understanding Evolution, University of California Museum of Paleontology)

Article Copyright© Peter Fotis Kapnistos - reproduced with permission.



 
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