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Monstrum Dolus

Posted by Supersquatch , in Cryptozoology/Cryptobotany 02 August 2012 · 1,578 views

sea monsters and serpents
Monstrum Dolus The Loch Ness Monster is a sea serpent cryptid that was first encountered by Saint Columba around 565 C.E. Many believe that the Loch Ness Monster--also known as Niseag (Scottish Gaelic), Nessie, the LNM or Nessiteras rhombopteryx (its proposed scientific name)--is not real; however, others disagree with that presumption. There is one main question here: does the Loch Ness Monster actually exist? And if it doesn't, is it misidentified or possibly a hoax?

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An artist's depiction of the Spicers sighting


After Saint Columba encountered Nessie, the next sighting didn't take place until 1933--nearly 1,400 years later. On July 22, George Spicer and his wife were driving in their car by the loch when they saw "a most extraordinary form of animal" across the road. They said the creature had a four-foot-tall, twenty-five-foot-long body and a ten-foot-long neck. This rendezvous was later called the Spicers sighting. After the Spicers sighting, encounters with Nessie became far more common.*

With all of the Nessie craze, the Daily Mail hired a big-game hunter--Marmaduke Wetherell--later that year to investigate sightings of the monster. In December of 1933, he discovered some enormous footprints on the shore which led to the water. However, when scientists from the Natural History Museum came to examine the tracks, they concluded that they were made from a dried hippopotamus's foot and that Wetherell hoaxed them.

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Marmaduke Wetherell


Also, on April 19, 1934, a well-respected gynecologist--Robert Kenneth Wilson--took the first photograph of a "head and neck" of Nessie. It was later dubbed the Surgeon's Photograph because Wilson didn't want his name to be associated with it. However, an article published in The Sunday Telegraph on December 7, 1975 revealed the photograph to be a hoax. In 1993, on his deathbed, Christian Spurling--Marmaduke Wetherell's stepson--said that he had made the monster out of some plastic and a toy submarine, which Wilson took a picture of. The grand mastermind behind the Surgeon's Photograph scheme? None other than Marmaduke Wetherell.

Does Nessie really exist? A full search in Loch Ness, sponsored by the British Broadcasting Corporation, in 2003, used six hundred sonar beams and satellite tracking to try to find the elusive Loch Ness Monster. Not a single animal of substantial size was found, fundamentally making Nessie a myth. Nevertheless, some are still hoping no matter how low the chances are.

References Footnotes

* Isn't it odd that many cryptids are sighted again usually right after the first sighting? Take the chupacabra for example. The first sighting of "the goat sucker" took place in 1995, but since then, there have been hundreds of encounters. Similarly, all three of the Dover Demon sightings took place over a twenty-five hour period in April of 1977.




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