Jump to content






Photo

Seeking Employment Within the Security Industry.

Posted by Ohelemapit , 13 February 2013 · 255 views

The Bodyguard profession does not have a "guarantee bench;" it does not have anyone to shout "Next." If a novice believes this is the way it works they have an unrealistic concept of life. If the novice feels that success comes to anyone and it's a matter of waiting for whose turn it is.

When a beginner trains he should be aware that he is learning the necessary theory; and we hope, in the awareness that is so important for survival. It will be up to each trainee to prepare himself and balance his very being with the important elements that can turn him into a professional. The most important skill a beginner should develop, the one skill that will assist him in becoming a professional is learning how to find a position as a Bodyguard. The complete beginner and the individual who has been in the Special Forces and is an expert with weapons, an accomplished martial artist and an experienced protective chauffeur have one thing in common. Neither of them knows how to find a client, how to start working. And yet, if neither of them ever works they are both absolute beginners. So it follows that the first thing to learn is how to find an assignment.

Schools do not teach this. They are geared to the exciting things that wannabes think they must learn to become bodyguards. The reason many schools can charge so much for training is they specialize in the glamour skills: guns, hand-to-hand combat, protective driving, etc. This results in many, many graduates of Bodyguard Schools knowing something about weapons and fighting, and even with these skills they are still have the same problem the complete beginner does. Finding employment.

In short: HOW DO YOU FIND THE ASSIGNMENTS (JOBS), AND THEN KEEP THEM! If you publish a website on the Internet no one can make a client click on your website, contact you, and then hire you.

There are many individuals who dream of becoming a bodyguard. Many of them have already had extensive training and experience and still they don’t work.

We receive all kinds of questions; the one most frequently asked is: “What school should I attend?”

We do not recommend schools because most of them teach useless subjects that are not required by the protection profession. Schools can be expensive; and it’s easy to pay a lot to learn unnecessary skills. The “elite” schools basically teach the same subjects but charge an exorbitant enrollment fee: it can be as high as $10,000 to $15,000 USD. The subjects vary, only the price changes. If a student can afford it he will usually opt for the most expensive.

The reasoning for this is the client can be shown a Certificate from the elite school.

So think. When a VIP asks: “What qualifications do you have to protect me?” do you believe a Certificate from a school will impress him?

If you respond with: “You see sir, I’m very well qualified – I have a Certificate from XXX Bodyguard School.” It’s like telling an employment interviewer for a Corporation that you are positive your educational requirements will meet the standards of his company; and then informing him you have a GED. Do not make the mistake of thinking anyone will want to hire someone just out of a Bodyguard School. If you’ve attended one, add what you’ve learned to your list of skills, and let it go at that. It’s true, we live in a “certificate” society, but too many individuals believe that a “certificate” proves they are capable of handling the professional requirements of an occupation. Don’t fall into this trap.

Before you rush out and hand over your money, consider a few things: 1) is any client going to hire someone to protect his life who has just “graduated” from a bodyguard school? 2) No matter how “elite” or “famous” a school is the client has probably never heard of it. The only place you will discover how famous a school is will be discovered in their advertising literature. This is similar to stopping in a strange small town and deciding to eat in a small café. You read the menu and discover you are eating in “Joe’s World Famous Diner.” Only Joe know it is “world famous.” 3) The client will not be impressed because one of the skills included in the training is “Fast Draw Skills” or “Sniper Techniques;”




Recent Entries

Recent Comments

0 user(s) viewing

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Tags

    Categories

    Latest Visitors

    • Photo
      Nefer-Ankhe
      27 Apr 2013 - 01:49
    • Photo
      StarMountainKid
      26 Apr 2013 - 15:48
    • Photo
      HecticSherlock
      26 Apr 2013 - 13:11
    • Photo
      Knight Of Shadows
      03 Mar 2013 - 16:03
    • Photo
      Seikage
      02 Mar 2013 - 04:14