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First Hundred Thousand Years of Our Universe

big bang cosmic microwave background cmb supernova cosmology project

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 10:49 PM

First Hundred Thousand Years of Our Universe


Berkeley Lab said:

Mystery fans know that the best way to solve a mystery is to revisit the scene where it began and look for clues. To understand the mysteries of our universe, scientists are trying to go back as far they can to the Big Bang. A new analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has taken the furthest look back through time yet – 100 years to 300,000 years after the Big Bang – and provided tantalizing new hints of clues as to what might have happened.

“We found that the standard picture of an early universe, in which radiation domination was followed by matter domination, holds to the level we can test it with the new data, but there are hints that radiation didn’t give way to matter exactly as expected,” says Eric Linder, a theoretical physicist with Berkeley Lab’s Physics Division and member of the Supernova Cosmology Project. “There appears to be an excess dash of radiation that is not due to CMB photons.”

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#2    Zeta Reticulum

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 08:42 AM

Just a hypothetical question:-

If we can look one way - to the start of the universe more or less, and see ancient stars whose light is just getting here now, what would someone see from the other direction?
Say 20 million years after the universe began, would they look this way and see nothing? because the light from here hasn't reached there yet.


#3    The Word of Thoth

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 10:00 AM

View PostZeta Reticulum, on 12 August 2013 - 08:42 AM, said:

Just a hypothetical question:-

If we can look one way - to the start of the universe more or less, and see ancient stars whose light is just getting here now, what would someone see from the other direction?
Say 20 million years after the universe began, would they look this way and see nothing? because the light from here hasn't reached there yet.

WOW!

I need more coffee for this question!
:ph34r:


#4    sepulchrave

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 02:30 PM

View PostZeta Reticulum, on 12 August 2013 - 08:42 AM, said:

Just a hypothetical question:-

If we can look one way - to the start of the universe more or less, and see ancient stars whose light is just getting here now, what would someone see from the other direction?
Say 20 million years after the universe began, would they look this way and see nothing? because the light from here hasn't reached there yet.
Every direction you look, you are always seeing something from the past.

If we had an implausibly good telescope, and looked out at a star system 20 light years away and saw an alien looking right back at us, that alien wouldn't see us. That alien would be looking in the direction that the we would occupy in 40 years time.





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