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The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


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#436    Slave2Fate

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:02 AM

We use sandpaper to shape materials even today (up to and including metal). The primary ingredient of sandpaper...sand. It doesn't take a genius to figure that out.

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

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You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#437    PHFATY

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 06:37 AM

This theory seems plausible when you factor in all the unexplained mysteries surrounding ancient ruins scattered across the globe.  Perhaps the reason why these mysteries have remained unexplained to modern man for so long is because of our robot-like natural tendencies to always revert to our preconceived notions or personal prejudices to process the past. Which can potentially taint the truth without our ever noticing that we are filling in the unknown or unexplained with convenient explanations based on what we think is so.

So rather than letting the past write its own history, modern man is sometimes often guilty of overwriting the truth with convenient excuses and explanations that repackages the past in ways that allows it to fit in well with the illusion that we think is our reality.  

I truly believe that we are not alone in this Universe. Not based on empirical evidence relating to ancient aliens or UFOs but rather based on mathematical statistics on how many potentially life supporting expoplanets exist in the Universe. And without even thinking about it, we can say that it most likely numbers in the trillions or more.

WHO BUILT THE ANCIENT MEGALITHIC NAN MADOL RUINS IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC?

http://pohnpeinanmadol.blogspot.com

MICRONESIA

#438    zoser

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 09:18 AM

View PostOniomancer, on 30 November 2012 - 10:23 PM, said:


You do realize a 6 inch long drill can still cut a two foot deep hole if it's attached to long enough shaft, right? This is a scaling problem, nothing more.

Try drilling granite with an ordinary 0.25 inch steel drill.  See how long it lasts.  Then imagine that's your copper and sand combination trying to drill a 2-3 inch diameter hole 2 feet deep.

Better still listen to the experts in the above video's; this is precisely what archaeology has lacked; specialist knowledge.

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#439    Slave2Fate

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 12:03 PM

View Postzoser, on 01 December 2012 - 09:18 AM, said:

Try drilling granite with an ordinary 0.25 inch steel drill.  See how long it lasts.  Then imagine that's your copper and sand combination trying to drill a 2-3 inch diameter hole 2 feet deep.

Better still listen to the experts in the above video's; this is precisely what archaeology has lacked; specialist knowledge.

That's why they probably used tubes to cut larger holes. You only need to cut around the perimeter and then use wedges to break apart the core. That decreases the work needed significantly. What was that you were saying about specialist knowledge?

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

"Don't argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level then beat you with experience." -Obviousman

You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#440    Slave2Fate

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 12:15 PM

Zoser, do you think it would be possible to use the copper/sand drilling method if it were attached to a modern hand held power drill?

Edited by Slave2Fate, 01 December 2012 - 12:16 PM.

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

"Don't argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level then beat you with experience." -Obviousman

You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#441    Babe Ruth

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:05 PM

View PostQuaentum, on 30 November 2012 - 05:35 PM, said:

Perhaps you can try to believe the ones that are backed by logic, common sense and evidence.  Make critical thinking your friend and you can never go wrong.

Agree 100%.  I offer the same unsolicited advice to any and all.

I'm willing to accept that the old man who created the Coral Castle in Homestead had somehow discovered and mastered some method for defeating gravity.  Perhaps it was the same method involved in building the pyramids and other similar sites all 'round the planet.

But common sense suggests humans were given this knowledge by mentors.  I doubt hunter-gatherers would have stumbled upon the method as they were out chasing animals.

Considering that diamond-tipped bits would be necessary to cut stones with such precision, common sense tells me that hunter-gatherers were not in possession of such diamond tools.  Nor do excavations reveal any such tools.

Common Sense!  Yessir, I'm all for it. :tsu:


#442    Gaden

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:45 PM

Posted Imagezoser, on 30 November 2012 - 12:50 PM, said:



Thank God for Von Daniken, Dunn, Hancock, Bauval, Tsoukalos, Childress, and all the modern thinking men that have successfully challenged the dinosaur half brains of the past few hundred years and who have helped make the truth available to thinking world.

View Postsynchronomy, on 01 December 2012 - 02:47 AM, said:

I honestly sat here for five minutes thinking and rereading that sentence several times in order to comprehend the enormity of the statement.
Other than that I decline the opportunity to comment on the meaning of it.
You have certainly clarified your viewpoint. :hmm:


Yeah, that one scared me, too. That statement should make it clear to anyone how useless it is to argue any longer.

I'm trying to see things from your point of view, I just can't get my head that far up my butt

#443    Gaden

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:49 PM

View PostPHFATY, on 01 December 2012 - 06:37 AM, said:

This theory seems implausible when you factor in all the unexplained mysteries surrounding ancient ruins scattered across the globe.  Perhaps the reason why these mysteries have remained unexplained to modern man for so long is because of our robot-like natural tendencies to always revert to our preconceived notions or personal prejudices to process the past. Which can potentially taint the truth without our ever noticing that we are filling in the unknown or unexplained with convenient explanations based on what we think is so.

So rather than letting the past write its own history, modern man is sometimes often guilty of overwriting the truth with convenient excuses and explanations that repackages the past in ways that allows it to fit in well with the illusion that we think is our reality.  

I truly believe that we are not alone in this Universe. Not based on empirical evidence relating to ancient aliens or UFOs but rather based on mathematical statistics on how many potentially life supporting expoplanets exist in the Universe. And without even thinking about it, we can say that it most likely numbers in the trillions or more.

There, that's better. Only added two letters, but it makes so much more sense.

I'm trying to see things from your point of view, I just can't get my head that far up my butt

#444    zoser

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 05:14 PM

View PostSlave2Fate, on 01 December 2012 - 12:15 PM, said:

Zoser, do you think it would be possible to use the copper/sand drilling method if it were attached to a modern hand held power drill?

Only an idiot would attempt it.  Either the copper is going to rapidly erode on the granite or it will rapidly erode on the sand.  It's a practical and physical non-starter.

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#445    bmk1245

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 06:32 PM

View Postzoser, on 01 December 2012 - 05:14 PM, said:

Only an idiot would attempt it.  Either the copper is going to rapidly erode on the granite or it will rapidly erode on the sand.  It's a practical and physical non-starter.
In case you didn't knew, copper and copper alloys ARE used as bond matrix in sintered diamond blades.

Arguing with fool is like playing chess with pigeon: he will scatter pieces, peck King's crown, crap on bishop, and fly away bragging how he won the game... (heard once, author unknown).
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#446    zoser

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 07:18 PM

View Postbmk1245, on 01 December 2012 - 06:32 PM, said:

In case you didn't knew, copper and copper alloys ARE used as bond matrix in sintered diamond blades.

Show me someone cutting 2 inch dia holes 2 feet deep in a solid granite granite block with a bow and I'll be convinced.  As I said in post 430 the smoking gun is that the spiral cutting marks on the samples that Chris Dunn analysed (and shown in the Inca Relic video) are only in one direction.

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#447    Babe Ruth

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 07:24 PM

Yeah, even IF hunter gathers could make such drills, what is going to stabilize those drills/tool as they work on stone?  That is machine work. If they could cut the stone, then they have to move the tool in a perfectly straight line?  How can that be?


#448    Slave2Fate

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 07:28 PM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 01 December 2012 - 07:24 PM, said:

Yeah, even IF hunter gathers could make such drills, what is going to stabilize those drills/tool as they work on stone?  That is machine work. If they could cut the stone, then they have to move the tool in a perfectly straight line?  How can that be?

Guide blocks.

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

"Don't argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level then beat you with experience." -Obviousman

You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#449    Slave2Fate

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 07:35 PM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 01 December 2012 - 03:05 PM, said:

Agree 100%.  I offer the same unsolicited advice to any and all.

I'm willing to accept that the old man who created the Coral Castle in Homestead had somehow discovered and mastered some method for defeating gravity.  Perhaps it was the same method involved in building the pyramids and other similar sites all 'round the planet.

But common sense suggests humans were given this knowledge by mentors.  I doubt hunter-gatherers would have stumbled upon the method as they were out chasing animals.

Considering that diamond-tipped bits would be necessary to cut stones with such precision, common sense tells me that hunter-gatherers were not in possession of such diamond tools.  Nor do excavations reveal any such tools.

Common Sense!  Yessir, I'm all for it. :tsu:

You're making the same mistake as all of the other AA proponents. You are assuming that primitive equals stupid. Hardly the case as the Natives at Pumu Punku had the same cognitive abilities as you or I. We only have the advantage of having access to more knowledge. They could solve problems as well (or better) than their modern day counterparts...us.

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

"Don't argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level then beat you with experience." -Obviousman

You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#450    Oniomancer

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 07:43 PM

View Postzoser, on 01 December 2012 - 09:18 AM, said:

Try drilling granite with an ordinary 0.25 inch steel drill.  See how long it lasts.  Then imagine that's your copper and sand combination trying to drill a 2-3 inch diameter hole 2 feet deep.

You must've missed where I quoted the part about steel, brass and copper used in conjunction with abrasive. Non-sintered core drills are made from ordinary steel. The type of abrasive makes little difference either. Quartz (IE: sand) is mohs 8. It'll cut anything mohs 8 or below, including itself.

Quote

Better still listen to the experts in the above video's; this is precisely what archaeology has lacked; specialist knowledge.

I've only made it half way through the second one as yet and so far all I'm hearing is dunn droning on about stuff totally outside his experience along with that other machinist and trading straw man assumptions with childress, who has no experience at all and can't even pronounce basalt right.

Edit: I did like that bit at about 14:20 though:

"Fairly close. obviously there are going to be some imperfections"

You don't say?  So much for laser-like precision.

Edited by Oniomancer, 01 December 2012 - 07:46 PM.

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