Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Egyptian Dictator


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#16    and then

and then

    Abyssus Abyssum Invocat

  • Member
  • 15,768 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Land's End

  • Because what came before never seems enough...

Posted 26 November 2012 - 04:54 AM

View PostBlackRedLittleDevil, on 26 November 2012 - 03:47 AM, said:

I recall reading at the time that the majority of Egyptians, who were fighting to liberate the country from a dictator (Mubarak), were also fully aware and adamant they did not want to end up being ruled by Islamic fundamentalists.  They were also fully aware that Mubarak was pilfering from US aid which was meant for the countries welfare. Sounds like the same stage act with different actors.

Where have those Egyptians gone?
Not to answer for her but I think those young people and middle class types are the one's burning MB offices in several cities.  It remains to be seen if new widespread protests will occur.  I really feel badly for them.

  We've cast the world, we've set the stage,
  for what could be, the darkest age...
“This is like playing poker with a guy who cheated you twice before. You know who does that, a moron.

#17    meryt-tetisheri

meryt-tetisheri

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,262 posts
  • Joined:12 Dec 2006
  • Gender:Female

Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:56 AM

It is difficult to respond briefly to your question, but I will try!

When the army first took over, a national debate started whether to have a new constitution first, or presidential elections. By that time a delegation from the MB had already visited Washington, where they seemingly succeeded in saying there all the things that were needed to be heard. Tantawy subsequently chose an MB legislator to formulate a referendum which was slanted in favor of Islamists. An intensive smear campaign started which demonized liberals and secularists as agents for Western powers, claimed that Baradei was responsible for the wrecking of Iraq, and that they will so endanger Islam and the society’s moral fabric, that voting for the constitution will be tantamount to voting against Islam. At the same time the MB vowed a government of national unity, that they will not run for more than 30% of parliamentary seats, and will not nominate a presidential candidate. The army in the meanwhile also participated in the smear campaign, accusing revolutionaries of having ‘foreign agendas’ and of thuggery.  Thousands were arrested and stood trial in front of military courts. That revolutionaries lacked leadership and failed to organize or unite did not help at all.

This is the background which led to the Islamists success in the parliamentary elections. Their dismal performance, failure to address any of the economic problems, preoccupation with settling old scores with rivals, and the free reign they gave to extremists diminished their popularity. During the presidential elections, approximately, only +/- 13 million out of 25 million who voted elected Mursi. Many did so because they disliked Shafik, or mistrusted his close ties with Mubarak; not because they necessarily wanted Mursi, yet still close to 12 million voted for Shafik. The elections were riddled with irregularities, from pre-marked tickets, to bribery and buying votes, and even preventing some Christian villages from voting.

Once in office, the charm campaign was replaced by exclusionary policies, inefficiency, control of the media (closure of TV stations & newspapers), nepotism (e.g. the minister of justice and vice-president are brothers, the newly appointed general prosecutor is their brother in law); economic crisis and poverty mushroomed, as did the rate of crime. The silence of the state towards the actions of Islamist extremists shocked and frightened not only Copts, but moderate Muslims as well. One of Mursi’s first presidential acts was to release 2000 convicted jihadists, yet when 16 army soldiers were killed by them in Sinai he failed in taking appropriate effective measures or even attending the soldiers' funeral. His unconditional backing of Hamas and doing so at the expense of Egypt earned him the title ‘the president of Gaza’; the influence and apparent control of the Murshid and MB on his policies earned him another title ‘estebn’ (spare tyre).

In all respects, Mursi proved himself to be a worst version of Mubarak, whether by the recent decree, or by showing phenomenal insensitivity towards the suffering of his people or their welfare. The Egyptian stock exchange lost 30 billion yesterday due to his decree. Food and fuel prices soared as did unemployment. Recently, 60 children, aged between 7- 11 years, died in an avoidable train accident in Assiut. Help failed to arrive for 12 long hours. Families went to the tracks to collect the remains of their children. The unequipped hospitals called on pharmacists nation-wide begging for Intravenous sodium bicarbonate , families were asked to go search for needed blood themselves. Mursi and the prime-minister failed to react for almost 2 days. Instead Qandil flew to Gaza to cry for the death of one child, doctors & 30 tons of medicine were sent to Gaza, and the Egyptian minister of health declared that he has sent blood supplies to Gaza “enough for one year and a half”. Mursi tweeted his condolences to the “ families of the victims of the tragic train accident, the victims, and their children”…then came the decree!

Egyptians of all classes are on the streets. The country now is totally polarized between the ‘people”, and MB & followers. For the first time in my life I hear the words ‘possibility of civil war’ said in Egypt.

Edited by meryt-tetisheri, 26 November 2012 - 07:24 AM.


#18    and then

and then

    Abyssus Abyssum Invocat

  • Member
  • 15,768 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Land's End

  • Because what came before never seems enough...

Posted 27 November 2012 - 09:43 AM

http://www.cbsnews.c...nging-showdown/
So the stage is set for new violence and I wonder if Morsi will be as reticent to use the army as Mubarak was?  I also keenly wonder if the army is a friend of the people as they are perceived to be?  I pray for wisdom and courage for the Egyptians in the coming days and months that they can avoid what is happening in Syria and at the same time avoid a new dictator.

  We've cast the world, we've set the stage,
  for what could be, the darkest age...
“This is like playing poker with a guy who cheated you twice before. You know who does that, a moron.

#19    meryt-tetisheri

meryt-tetisheri

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,262 posts
  • Joined:12 Dec 2006
  • Gender:Female

Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:28 PM

About two days ago Dr. Nageh Ibrahim, a founder member of Jamaa Islamiya (reformed: now denouncing the use of violence), predicted a campaign of assassination targeting liberals, intellectuals, and politicians next month. At the same time MB and Salafi leaders announced their plans for a ‘million-man-march’ counter-demonstration in support of the presidential decree. This counter-demonstration was planned to take place today, at the same time opponents of the decree are demonstrating. Those leaders bragged that their numbers will engulf the president’s opponents; the Salafi Abou Ismail stated ‘since when does blood scare us’, so the stage does seem to be set for new bloodshed. However, it was announced today that this counter-demonstration has been cancelled to ‘avoid bloodshed’. It is believed that the Islamists are actually facing a conundrum: the level of popular anger against them is so high that they cannot count on any supporters other than their own members. Their numbers are too small to send bus-loads of supporters from the provinces as is their practice, yet still have enough members staying in the provinces to protect their offices. The illusion of their wide support and large membership is being exposed. International warnings and criticism from the UN, EU, and others, have also helped.

Today’s demonstrations against the decree will be joined by the syndicates of judges, lawyers, media and press, student unions, as well as independent labor unions. Mursi has managed to unite all factions! I am more worried about Islamist snipers and a repeat of the “battle of the camel” than the army. It remains to be seen whether they will repeat their previous performance. The organizers of today’s demonstration are planning to form human shields between security forces and demonstrators; they are stressing that the demonstration will be ‘peaceful’ just like the January ’11 revolution.

I would like to add that Mursi’s contention that the decree is temporary; the only means to protect democracy is totally false. What it actually does is put Egyptians in a catch-22 choice: either vote yes in the coming referendum and accept the constitution draft which is being rushed, or accept that through the unlimited totalitarian powers of Mursi, which he would use unhindered, the same constitution and laws would be enforced by decree.

When the election law was first drafted the MB was warned by many, including the same legislator who drafted the first referendum I referred to in my previous post and General Lachine of SCAF that it was unconstitutional, yet, in their rush to grab power and ascertain that the new constitution would be drafted by them and according to their ideology, they insisted on holding the elections then. The Supreme Constitutional Court had no option but to annul the parliament. That the judges were appointed by Mubarak is also a lame excuse, Mubarak ruled for thirty years, who else would have endorsed their appointment? Imagine if the US Supreme Court is disbanded every time a new president is elected! The presidential elections were supervised by the judiciary; Mursi took the presidential oath vowing to uphold the law; if the judiciary are corrupt as he claims, then doubt is cast on legitimacy of the elections which brought him to power. Some view his decree as a breach of the oath he took; as a result calls to impeach him are starting to rise.

The article below well explains the situation in Egypt now.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/egypt-at-a-crossroads-after-morsi-grants-himself-sweeping-powers-a-869291.html

http://www.spiegel.d...t-a-869309.html

Edited by meryt-tetisheri, 27 November 2012 - 12:40 PM.


#20    docyabut2

docyabut2

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,522 posts
  • Joined:12 Aug 2011

Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:36 AM

I really feel sorry for the people of Egypt,the young want a democracy free of dictatorships and religous dominations.My hope is they find that true freedom.


#21    Black Red Devil

Black Red Devil

    Mean as Hell

  • Member
  • 2,610 posts
  • Joined:04 Oct 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney

  • I would if I could
    But I can't, so I won't

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:04 AM

View Postmeryt-tetisheri, on 27 November 2012 - 12:28 PM, said:

It is believed that the Islamists are actually facing a conundrum: the level of popular anger against them is so high that they cannot count on any supporters other than their own members. Their numbers are too small to send bus-loads of supporters from the provinces as is their practice, yet still have enough members staying in the provinces to protect their offices. The illusion of their wide support and large membership is being exposed. International warnings and criticism from the UN, EU, and others, have also helped.

Today’s demonstrations against the decree will be joined by the syndicates of judges, lawyers, media and press, student unions, as well as independent labor unions. Mursi has managed to unite all factions! I am more worried about Islamist snipers and a repeat of the “battle of the camel” than the army. It remains to be seen whether they will repeat their previous performance. The organizers of today’s demonstration are planning to form human shields between security forces and demonstrators; they are stressing that the demonstration will be ‘peaceful’ just like the January ’11 revolution.



This is why I was surprised the other day and asked the question.  This is the typical outcome I was expecting when I heard the MB were planting their roots in all facets of Egyptian society.  Thanks for your informative response and update Meryt.

While the road is long and full of hurdles, there is no doubt in my mind that those Egyptian who fought to get rid of a corrupt dictator, bribed by the West, were the majority and fought because they wanted to create and develop a better and prosperous society for their kids, not because they were the usual radical extremists on a lost and depriving mission.

I believe Egypt and Egyptians have too much history to just become another Taliban infested nest of lunatics.

Edited by BlackRedLittleDevil, 28 November 2012 - 04:28 AM.

We are each our own devil, and we make this world our hell

- Oscar Wilde

#22    Raptor Witness

Raptor Witness

    Savant

  • Member
  • 2,774 posts
  • Joined:17 Sep 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:So beautiful

  • ראה

Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:38 AM

View PostRaptor Witness, on 26 November 2012 - 12:24 AM, said:

I'm betting on the people of Egypt to bleed until they nullify this new Pharaoh’s declarations.

Morsi flees the palace. I love it.

Posted Image "Make Manifest Destiny a memory ..." 12-7-2011  "When the earth is displaced fully three times at the point of destiny ..." 10-29-2013

#23    Tutankhaten-pasheri

Tutankhaten-pasheri

    Buratinologist

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,637 posts
  • Joined:22 Sep 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:страна дураков

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:14 PM

What Morsi has done is essentially the same as Hitler with his enabling act of 1933, which, in it's ultimate effect, made his political party the state. I am surprised this has not yet been spotted


#24    Raptor Witness

Raptor Witness

    Savant

  • Member
  • 2,774 posts
  • Joined:17 Sep 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:So beautiful

  • ראה

Posted 09 December 2012 - 04:18 AM

View PostAtentutankh-pasheri, on 06 December 2012 - 06:14 PM, said:

What Morsi has done is essentially the same as Hitler with his enabling act of 1933, which, in it's ultimate effect, made his political party the state. I am surprised this has not yet been spotted
I wonder if he has picked out a plot for himself in the Valley of the Kings yet.

Most Pharoah's like to get started early on the afterlife.



Posted Image "Make Manifest Destiny a memory ..." 12-7-2011  "When the earth is displaced fully three times at the point of destiny ..." 10-29-2013

#25    Raptor Witness

Raptor Witness

    Savant

  • Member
  • 2,774 posts
  • Joined:17 Sep 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:So beautiful

  • ראה

Posted 27 January 2013 - 08:54 AM

Egypt will not be free so long as Morsi is in power. Not because he is Islamic, but because he is another puppet of the West.


The U.S. feeds their army, while the people bleed.


It would be better to feed the people of Egypt, and forget the army.


Have you no foresight, Washington? Will you concoct hate and expect kisses?


Leave Israel to God. Let the people of Egypt be the puppets, and peace will come to the Middle East without bribes.





Edited by Raptor Witness, 27 January 2013 - 08:58 AM.

Posted Image "Make Manifest Destiny a memory ..." 12-7-2011  "When the earth is displaced fully three times at the point of destiny ..." 10-29-2013

#26    AsteroidX

AsteroidX

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 3,570 posts
  • Joined:16 Dec 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Free America

  • it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security

Posted 27 January 2013 - 10:10 AM

Washington is out of control. Please visit our political board on this forum for a perspective. Ill give you a clip from Miami Florida that occurred over the past few days.







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users