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Curiosity's New Home

mars curiosity mars science laboratory rover nasa

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 09:35 PM

Curiosity's New Home


www.nasa.gov said:

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These are the first two full-resolution images of the Martian surface from the Navigation cameras on NASA's Curiosity rover, which are located on the rover's "head" or mast. The rim of Gale Crater can be seen in the distance beyond the pebbly ground.

The topography of the rim is very mountainous due to erosion. The ground seen in the middle shows low-relief scarps and plains. The foreground shows two distinct zones of excavation likely carved out by blasts from the rover's descent stage thrusters.

These are full-resolution images, 1024 by 1024 pixels in size.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#2    docyabut2

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 11:34 PM

I just love these little robots they send to mars they are so cute, :) even though some have been lost. Mars is a interesting planet.  We know by a Mars rock found on our planet that contained organisms smaller then found in earth, so life did start there and some say maybe seeded our planet. However something happen to stop that growth,  Mars has the biggest volcano in the solor system  and maybe erupted in heat that stopped the growth.  I believe we are to trying to find out how we can restart that growth.

Edited by docyabut2, 09 August 2012 - 12:24 AM.


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 11:54 PM

Wow, so many inaccuracies in one post, it's difficult to know where to start.

To call Curiosity "little" is to demonstrate an almost total lack of knowledge of it. It weighs close to a ton and is around the size of a car.

No rover has ever been lost, although several landers have. No US Mars mission has failed since Mars Polar Lander in 1999.

We do not "know" that Mars had/has life. The Alan Hills meteorite (the Mars rock you refer to) is not proof of such tiny micro-organisms. Further research has demonstrated that chemical reactions, not biological, are the more likely origin of the structures some thought to be fossils.

We can't be trying to discover how to "restart the growth" since we have no unambiguous evidence that there was ever life on Mars to begin with.

The very point of Curiosity is to look for signs of life.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    docyabut2

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:11 AM

qoute-The very point of Curiosity is to look for signs of life.

DA :),Then why are they looking for sighs of life?

Edited by docyabut2, 09 August 2012 - 12:11 AM.


#5    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:23 AM

View Postdocyabut2, on 09 August 2012 - 12:11 AM, said:

DA :),Then why are they looking for sighs of life?
Erm, to find out if there is any.

Why would they be looking for signs of life if they already know it exists?

Maybe you spend a lot of your time looking for things when you already know where they are, but most of the rest of the world doesn't. They tend to not waste time by focusing on looking for things they don't know the location or existence of. This really isn't rocket science (well, Curiosity is, but your question isn't).

A word to the wise, next time you start a post with "DA" make sure you don't follow it up with a really, REALLY dumb question.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 09 August 2012 - 12:24 AM.
typo.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#6    docyabut2

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:34 AM

http://www.dailymail...-life-Mars.html


#7    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:45 AM

View Postdocyabut2, on 09 August 2012 - 12:34 AM, said:


Quote

However British experts said the evidence, though exciting, had to be treated with caution and could not be taken as conclusive.

Quote

Dr John Bridges, a planetary scientist at the Natural History Museum who has studied Martian meteorites, said: "This is an interesting contribution to the research on this very important rock, but I don't see it as definitive evidence of life on Mars.


Your move.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 09 August 2012 - 12:47 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#8    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 02:11 AM

To get back on topic:


First 360-Degree Panorama From NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover



www.nasa.gov said:

PASADENA, Calif. -- Remarkable image sets from NASA's Curiosity rover and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter are continuing to develop the story of Curiosity's landing and first days on Mars.

The images from Curiosity's just-activated navigation cameras, or Navcams, include the rover's first self-portrait, looking down at its deck from above. Another Navcam image set, in lower-resolution thumbnails, is the first 360-degree view of Curiosity's new home in Gale Crater. Also downlinked were two, higher-resolution Navcams providing the most detailed depiction to date of the surface adjacent to the rover.

"These Navcam images indicate that our powered descent stage did more than give us a great ride, it gave our science team an amazing freebie," said John Grotzinger, project scientist for the mission from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "The thrust from the rockets actually dug a one-and-a-half-foot-long [0.5-meter] trench in the surface. It appears we can see Martian bedrock on the bottom. Its depth below the surface is valuable data we can use going forward."

Another image set, courtesy of the Context Camera, or CTX, aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has pinpointed the final resting spots of the six, 55-pound (25-kilogram) entry ballast masses. The tungsten masses impacted the Martian surface at a high speed of about 7.5 miles (12 kilometers) from Curiosity's landing location.
Curiosity's latest images are available at: http://1.usa.gov/MfiyD0 .

Wednesday, the team deployed the 3.6 foot-tall (1.1-meter) camera mast, activated and gathered surface radiation data from the rover's Radiation Assessment Detector and concluded testing of the rover's high-gain antenna.
Curiosity carries 10 science instruments with a total mass 15 times as large as the science payloads on NASA's Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Some of the tools, such as a laser-firing instrument for checking rocks' elemental composition from a distance, are the first of their kind on Mars. Curiosity will use a drill and scoop, which are located at the end of its robotic arm, to gather soil and powdered samples of rock interiors, then sieve and parcel out these samples into the rover's analytical laboratory instruments.

To handle this science toolkit, Curiosity is twice as long and five times as heavy as Spirit or Opportunity. The Gale Crater landing site places the rover within driving distance of layers of the crater's interior mountain. Observations from orbit have identified clay and sulfate minerals in the lower layers, indicating a wet history.

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera is operated by the University of Arizona in Tucson. The instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colo. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Exploration Rover projects are managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The rover was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver built the orbiter.

For more about NASA's Curiosity mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mars and http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl .

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at: http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity .

For more about NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mro .

Guy Webster/D.C. Agle 818-354-5011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
Guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov / agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
Dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

2012-235



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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#9    docyabut2

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 05:36 PM

Wasp not to be a  smartie, or anything:) , but why did we even go to Mars if we didn`t think there was once life there, after finding that Mars rock.


#10    Hazzard

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 05:41 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 09 August 2012 - 05:36 PM, said:

Wasp not to be a  smartie, or anything:) , but why did we even go to Mars if we didn`t think there was once life there, after finding that Mars rock.


The MSL mission has four scientific goals: Determine whether Mars could ever have supported life — including the role of water, study the climate and geology of Mars. It is also useful preparation for a future manned mission to Mars.
To contribute to these goals, MSL has six main scientific objectives:[12][21] As part of its exploration, it also measured the radiation exposure in the interior of the spacecraft as it traveled to Mars, and it is continuing radiation measurements as it explores the surface of Mars. This data would be important for a future manned mission.[22]


http://en.wikipedia....ence_Laboratory

I still await the compelling Exhibit A.

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#11    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 06:00 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 09 August 2012 - 05:36 PM, said:

Wasp not to be a  smartie, or anything:) , but why did we even go to Mars if we didn`t think there was once life there, after finding that Mars rock.
I'm afraid you are demonstrating faulty logiic as well as a lack of knowledge here.

We were sending missions to Mars BEFORE we found that rock. The Viking landers were looking for signs of life on Mars in 1976. The Alan Hills meteorite was not found until 1984, and the announcement of possible fossils not made until 1996. Why did we send them?

We have sent missions to the Moon, to Venus, to Mercury, to asteroids and so on, all places where we do not believe there to be life. Why did we send them?

We send missions to learn more about our solar system. The search for life is just part of this.

You are making a connection between the ALH 84001 meteorite and Mars exploration which does not exist. Missions such as Curiosity would go ahead even if it had not been discovered.

I repeat no unambiguous evidence of life has been found on Mars.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 09 August 2012 - 06:02 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#12    docyabut2

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 09:59 AM

Right the Viking landers 1970`s to take pictures and dig, the tests were not conculsive. however the rovers to further search in the 1990`s after  the rock was found in 1984.I don`nt think we would have gone back to further dig if we didn`t think life once existed there.They do think there were once seas there that supported life. Something destroyed the planet and it may have been  a Olympus Mons eruption the largest volcano in the solar system on Mars. What else would have trown rocks all the way to earth.

Edited by docyabut2, 10 August 2012 - 10:11 AM.


#13    Abramelin

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 12:34 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 10 August 2012 - 09:59 AM, said:

Right the Viking landers 1970`s to take pictures and dig, the tests were not conculsive. however the rovers to further search in the 1990`s after  the rock was found in 1984.I don`nt think we would have gone back to further dig if we didn`t think life once existed there.They do think there were once seas there that supported life. Something destroyed the planet and it may have been  a Olympus Mons eruption the largest volcano in the solar system on Mars. What else would have trown rocks all the way to earth.

How about an impact of an asteroid? Or several impacts?


#14    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 05:30 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 10 August 2012 - 12:34 PM, said:



How about an impact of an asteroid? Or several impacts?
Which is exactly what the scientists think happened.

docyabut2, once again you are not being logical. You have a fixation with Olympus Mons and ALH 84001, but demonstrate a lack of knowledge of both.

If it takes Olympus Mons to throw rocks off of the surface of a planetary body how do you explain the presence of meteorites of Lunar origin?





"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#15    Iron_Lotus

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 05:42 PM

*facepalm* my brain hurts waspie.


also amazing photos people can say mars is boring but i think theres something oddly beautiful about the martian landscape

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"A...Aurora Borealis?! At this time of year?!? At this time of day!?!  In this part of the country!? Localized entirely within your kitchen!?!"   ...."Yes!"





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