Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Focus on growing threat of space debris

space debris esa

  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,115 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 22 April 2013 - 11:09 AM

ESA said:

The continuing growth in space debris poses an increasing threat to economically vital orbital regions. Next week, hundreds of top experts from across the globe will meet at Europe's largest-ever debris forum to share their latest research findings and discuss potential solutions.

Satellite operators worldwide, including those flying telecom, weather, navigation, broadcast and climate-monitoring missions, are now focusing their efforts on controlling space debris.

Posted Image Source

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#2    Ashotep

Ashotep

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 7,407 posts
  • Joined:10 May 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

  • Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway-John Wayne

Posted 22 April 2013 - 12:13 PM

Hope they can come up with a solution.  Maybe a giant vacuum cleaner.


#3    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,115 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 22 April 2013 - 12:16 PM

View PostHilander, on 22 April 2013 - 12:13 PM, said:

Hope they can come up with a solution.  Maybe a giant vacuum cleaner.
There are many potential solutions, sadly a vacuum cleaner isn't one of them, space basically being a vacuum already.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#4    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,047 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 22 April 2013 - 01:01 PM

A technology that can clean up the debris can also be used to removed working satellites, say in a war.  I think this is the main reason for the conference.  Some countries don't want the States unilaterally developing such a technology.


#5    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,115 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 22 April 2013 - 01:19 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 22 April 2013 - 01:01 PM, said:

A technology that can clean up the debris can also be used to removed working satellites, say in a war.  I think this is the main reason for the conference.  Some countries don't want the States unilaterally developing such a technology.
Getting a bit paranoid there aren't you Frank? Your argument makes little no sense.

Firstly, if what you are trying to do is prevent the US having a military capability why do it through an international civilian organisation?

Secondly it's a bit late anyway. The US, Russia and China already have anti-satellite capabilities. To take out an enemy satellite there is no need to carefully remove it from orbit, you simply shoot it down. Spending vast amounts of money to safely de-orbit it makes no sense at all when you can use a much cheaper missile.

The removal of space debris has long been a goal of ESA's (do a search and you will find several topics on ESA's and space debris that I have posted in the past). There is no hidden agenda here, this is exactly what it says it is.



"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#6    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,047 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 22 April 2013 - 02:41 PM

Political difficulties may also extend to the hardware and methodologies used to remove space debris from orbit because they may be construed to have the potential dual use as a weapon to either disable or de-orbit functioning space objects.  Development and use of technology and methodologies may proceed without the intent of using them for harmful purposes; however, political and diplomatic posturing by other space faring nations and non-space faring nations alike could brand space debris removal efforts as a guise for more threatening activities simply because the potential exists for the technology and methodologies to be used in a manner inconsistent with their true purpose.

http://www.onorbitwa...-debris-removal


#7    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,115 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 22 April 2013 - 03:46 PM

That's a massive non sequitur you've employed there.

It's a fairly large jump from "there are political difficulties" with space removal because of the "potential exists" for the technologies to be "construed" that they can be used in a nefarious way to claiming that they are actually being developed as weapons, a claim not made in you quote.

It is a monumentally massive jump from that quote to your initial claim:

View PostFrank Merton, on 22 April 2013 - 01:01 PM, said:

I think this is the main reason for the conference.  Some countries don't want the States unilaterally developing such a technology.
The article you quoted in no way backs up your claim. You are going to have to do better than that if you want to show that it your claim is nothing more than paranoia on your part.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#8    shrooma

shrooma

    doesn't have one screw fully tightened.....

  • Member
  • 3,516 posts
  • Joined:14 Feb 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:leeds, UK.

  • Live.
    Sin.
    Die.

Posted 23 April 2013 - 11:56 AM

View PostHilander, on 22 April 2013 - 12:13 PM, said:

Hope they can come up with a solution.  Maybe a giant vacuum cleaner.
.
like the one they had in spaceballs....?
:-)
may the schwartz be with you!!

- - - - -disclaimer- - - - -    
all posts- without exception- are humourous.
if you fail to grasp the sublety, then don't whine on like a mardy-arsed
bĦt˘h due to your lack of understanding.

#9    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,047 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 23 April 2013 - 12:33 PM

Well I think it does back up my claim.  A lot of countries, including Vietnam, see this emphasis on cleaning up space debris as an excuse for deploying technology that will later be used to keep them from having their own space program.


#10    moonshadow60

moonshadow60

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 710 posts
  • Joined:17 Dec 2006
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Maine

  • "There comes a time when you have to choose between turning the page or just closing the book"... James Wilson

Posted 23 April 2013 - 01:15 PM

There is an awful lot of valuable metal up there that many people would love to sell for scrap.


(Sorry about the edit.  Didn't have my glasses on.)

Edited by moonshadow60, 23 April 2013 - 01:16 PM.


#11    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 14,047 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • fmerton.blogspot.com

Posted 23 April 2013 - 01:40 PM

I suspect it will be vaporized on re-entry.  At least I hope it is.


#12    highdesert50

highdesert50

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 591 posts
  • Joined:09 Jul 2010
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 April 2013 - 01:52 PM

It seems a shame the space debris cannot be repurposed. A great deal of expense goes to simply orbiting an object. There is talk of mining asteroids. But, can an industry be realized in recycling these satellites and the alike as an orbiting junkyard? Can the mass of these combined objects perhaps be used to shield the earth from future encounters with errant asteroids by altering trajectories while still at a great distance?


#13    wimfloppp

wimfloppp

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 101 posts
  • Joined:14 Jan 2013

Posted 23 April 2013 - 02:10 PM

What we need is a big net.


#14    DONTEATUS

DONTEATUS

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 17,434 posts
  • Joined:15 Feb 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Planet TEXAS

Posted 23 April 2013 - 02:20 PM

It does present a question,? What must it be like on the ISS really? It must be quite the worry in the backs of all our crews that visit that Station.
but I only counted one shooting satr last night in the North Eastern sky, there were supposed to be many comming into our thick fermage !
Man I miss Mid ! :tu:

This is a Work in Progress!

#15    Katzenking

Katzenking

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Joined:18 Apr 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Black Forest, Germany

Posted 23 April 2013 - 03:14 PM

High time to do something about this mess.
Perhaps some sort of magnetic device could do the job.

The irrationality of a thing is no argument against its existence, rather a condition of it.
- Friedrich Nietzsche -





Also tagged with space debris, esa

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users