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Curiosity Finds Iron Meteorite on Mars [merged]

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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 09:02 PM

Curiosity Finds Iron Meteorite on Mars


www.nasa.gov said:

This rock encountered by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is an iron meteorite called "Lebanon," similar in shape and luster to iron meteorites found on Mars by the previous generation of rovers, Spirit and Opportunity.  Lebanon is about 2 yards or 2 meters wide (left to right, from this angle). The smaller piece in the foreground is called "Lebanon B."

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#2    Merc14

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 08:25 PM

http://www.extremete...iting-territory




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NASA’s Curiosity rover has encountered a massive iron meteorite on Mars. At roughly two meters (6.5 feet) wide, and who knows how much beneath the surface, the meteorite (dubbed “Lebanon”) might be the largest ever discovered on Mars. In other news, Curiosity recently celebrated its first Martian anniversary on the Red Planet (almost two Earth years), and is now about two thirds of the way to its primary target of Mount Sharp, which it should reach in early 2015. Perhaps most interestingly, Curiosity recently passed into a region of terrain that is much more likely to yield exciting geology data and dramatic photos of the Martian landscape.

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#3    questionmark

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 08:30 PM

hmmm... looks like it just found a good reason to get to Mars: lotsa cheap iron lying around....

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 08:38 PM

View Postquestionmark, on 16 July 2014 - 08:30 PM, said:

hmmm... looks like it just found a good reason to get to Mars: lotsa cheap iron lying around....

A few iron meteorites hardly constitutes lots.

If you are looking for iron from space then the asteroid belt is a much better idea.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#5    Merc14

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:28 AM

View Postquestionmark, on 16 July 2014 - 08:30 PM, said:

hmmm... looks like it just found a good reason to get to Mars: lotsa cheap iron lying around....

I take it you don't approve of the Mars Science Laboratory mission?

Believing when there is no compelling evidence is a mistake.  The idea is to withhold belief until there is compelling evidence and if the universe does not comply with our predispositions, okay, then we have the wrenching obligation to accommodate to the way the universe really is.  - Carl Sagan

Who is more humble, the scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever the universe has to teach us or somebody who says everything in this book should be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of the human beings involved in the writing of this legend - Carl Sagan

#6    keithisco

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 12:48 PM

It would be good if the orbiter imaged the impact crater (if there is one) and how the impact of such a large meteorite affected the surrounding area and geology. How did the immense heat from the meteorite interact with its immediate environment? I would expect glassy spherules to be reasonably abundant, have any been found in the vicinity?






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