Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * * 1 votes

Did humans reach Americas 22,000 years ago?


  • Please log in to reply
57 replies to this topic

#31    WaknakiTohbi

WaknakiTohbi

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Joined:30 Apr 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tejas

Posted 03 May 2013 - 06:54 AM

IMO, Manifest destiny would be a political/racial aspect. When the policy makers decided it was ethically "ok" to take the land of the First people's.  it was based on the premises that the red man Immigrated into the land. It wasn't theirs, they didn't belong.

Any empirical evidence found now. Undermines the philosophy of the Founding Fathers, they generally don't like that..


#32    Myles

Myles

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 3,915 posts
  • Joined:08 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 May 2013 - 11:32 AM

View PostWaknakiTohbi, on 03 May 2013 - 06:54 AM, said:

IMO, Manifest destiny would be a political/racial aspect. When the policy makers decided it was ethically "ok" to take the land of the First people's.  it was based on the premises that the red man Immigrated into the land. It wasn't theirs, they didn't belong.

Any empirical evidence found now. Undermines the philosophy of the Founding Fathers, they generally don't like that..

Who is "they"?


#33    WaknakiTohbi

WaknakiTohbi

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Joined:30 Apr 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tejas

Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:59 PM

If you read it word for word, "they" would be the policy makers. Now if you looked at it deeper. "They" would be the sons of the founding fathers. And even deeper than that. "They" would be the folks in academia that can't get over everything they were taught was wrong.




#34    Myles

Myles

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 3,915 posts
  • Joined:08 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:52 PM

I read it as "they" meaning the founding fathers who are now dead and really don't play a role in scientific study and conclusions of today.


#35    brizink

brizink

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 100 posts
  • Joined:23 Dec 2011

Posted 04 May 2013 - 06:37 AM

well most mainstream scientists will say that the Chinese or the Vikings came here much earlier than Columbus, the facts are that the Sumerians came here before anyone other than the natives which is evident with the Fuente Magna Bowl, that features Cuneiform writing. It's not so  hard to believe that humans could have come here so long ago given the distances "non-seafaring" cultures have managed to travel over the ages.


#36    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 04 May 2013 - 02:44 PM

View Postbrizink, on 04 May 2013 - 06:37 AM, said:

well most mainstream scientists will say that the Chinese or the Vikings came here much earlier than Columbus, the facts are that the Sumerians came here before anyone other than the natives which is evident with the Fuente Magna Bowl, that features Cuneiform writing. It's not so  hard to believe that humans could have come here so long ago given the distances "non-seafaring" cultures have managed to travel over the ages.

The Fuente Magna bowl is often spoken of in the same context as the Pokotia Monolith (or Monument), a stone statue standing 1.3 m (4 ft. 3 in.) tall and closely resembling the otherworldly, stylized, and heavily-eroded sculptures of nearby Tiwanaku (Tiahuanaco). According to alternative archaeologists and ancient astronaut theorists, this statue is covered in Sumerian writing, just like the Fuente Magna bowl.

(...)

Afrocentrism is a false pseudoscience that shares much in common with the ancient astronaut theory. Both propose a single explanation for ancient history (African dominance or space aliens) and both use almost identical evidence to support the notion that the cultural achievements of native peoples elsewhere in the world should be ascribed to the direct intervention or influence of African migrants or space aliens. As seen with Dr. Winters, as well as the Nuwabian movement, some Afrocentrists also cross over into ancient alien theorizing as a way of justifying the special nature of African peoples.

So, the alleged Sumerian writing on the Pokotia Monolith is little more than the wish-fulfillment projection of an Afrocentrist who saw what he wanted to see in ambiguous markings because of a pre-determined theory that itself rested on no firm evidence.

Naturally this is good enough proof for alien enthusiast websites and David Childress, who wrote an article about the monolith last year. As the old saying goes, consider the source.


http://www.jasoncola...a-monolith.html

.

Edited by Abramelin, 04 May 2013 - 02:45 PM.


#37    billyf

billyf

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 113 posts
  • Joined:18 Jan 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:warren ma

  • "I think that god in creating man somewhat over estimated his ability." Oscar Wilde

Posted 08 May 2013 - 03:05 PM

View Postfreetoroam, on 30 April 2013 - 01:14 PM, said:

"Of course America had been discovered before Columbus, but it had always been hushed up"...Oscar Wilde.
Oscar wilde was a genius....

so long and thanks for all the fish

#38    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 08 May 2013 - 03:35 PM

View Postbillyf, on 08 May 2013 - 03:05 PM, said:

Oscar wilde was a genius....

Or he just said what was known by everyone in his time: that the Native Americans discovered it first.


#39    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,098 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:51 PM

View PostParsec, on 01 May 2013 - 11:46 AM, said:

Surely, given the implications, it requires further analysis, but this time things could be slightly different from other researches and findigs.
Consider that Eric Boeda is one of the most authoritative European researchers and anthropologists of our times, so, if HE writes something like this, the least we can do is listen to him and think deeply before replying.
I'd agree that further analysis is needed. I only meant to comment on the appearance of the supposed tools. That they are extraordinarily crude and appear to be possible by way of gravel faulting. That the specific type of stone came from Kms away is an interesting bit of evidence, but still not final proof. There is any number of ways for stones to have been moved around. I'm not very familiar with the region so don't know what kind of animals and plants live there, or what the watercourses look like, but in other parts of the world, animals and water could move stones that distance easily.

I meant no disrespect to Mr Boeda, but was commenting on the physical appearance of the stones alone. Perhaps he has much better examples and they simply have not been published? I don't know. But, from what I've read these "tools" are still suspect by a large percentage of the archeological society.

Quote

To me sometimes we forget that we're not experts (at least, I can't consider me one), but (at the very best) well educated people with a well developed thinking method.
It's always a good thing to think with our own minds and don't follow blindly what others say, but we have to consider that if someone who did this job for more than 30 years, who's spent three years on site and, like I wrote, is one of the most influential anthropoligists alive, well, maybe he knows what he's talking about and more than we do.
I certainly am not a skilled archeologist, so I'm not an expert. I do however have 40+ years of outdoor experience looking at stones and streams and woodlands and whatnot, and I have seen many, many stones that are simple fractures that look like these "tools".

I agree it depends on the context of where the stones were found to show that they are human in their placement, use or manufacture. For example, if there are flakes at the site, or if the stones were all layed out along a wall, or if they were found with bones/animal remains nearby, that would be great contextual evidence.

Quote

And who knows, maybe you've just missed a great finding in Oregon, because of your untrained eye (obviously no offense intended, it's really hard to recognize stone tools)!
That's why I'm very interested in the finding, because Boeda has a very well trained eye (much more than many of his collegues)!
No offense taken...

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#40    Black Red Devil

Black Red Devil

    Mean as Hell

  • Member
  • 2,297 posts
  • Joined:04 Oct 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney

  • I would if I could
    But I can't, so I won't

Posted 09 May 2013 - 04:53 AM

Decade more, decade less.....


#41    TheTreasureGamer

TheTreasureGamer

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 26 posts
  • Joined:12 May 2013
  • Gender:Not Selected

  • Silence will fall when the question is asked. On the fields of the Trenzalore with the Fall of the Eleventh.

Posted 12 May 2013 - 04:10 PM

Interesting....


#42    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,544 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 12 May 2013 - 04:18 PM

View Postbillyf, on 08 May 2013 - 03:05 PM, said:

Oscar wilde was a genius....
I think his implication is that it's too bad is wasn't hushed up again the last time it was discovered. (Or maybe I'm explaining something that's patently obvious.  If so I apologize).


#43    docyabut2

docyabut2

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,966 posts
  • Joined:12 Aug 2011

Posted 12 May 2013 - 04:59 PM

No, there are no human remains found that are dated 20,000 years ago, the oldest  bones found so far are about 14,000 years ago.

http://news.national...-skeletons.html


#44    Bavarian Raven

Bavarian Raven

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,402 posts
  • Joined:14 Sep 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:British Columbia

Posted 12 May 2013 - 05:15 PM

Anyone heard another more definite about Goodyear's work?

http://archive.archa...ews/topper.html

http://www.scienceda...41118104010.htm

:) Cheers.


#45    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 16,098 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 12 May 2013 - 05:37 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 12 May 2013 - 04:59 PM, said:

No, there are no human remains found that are dated 20,000 years ago, the oldest  bones found so far are about 14,000 years ago.

http://news.national...-skeletons.html
Since there have been no human remains found that old, the tools MUST be from Bigfoot or possibly Aliens!!!!!

Teasing!!!

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users