Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Theory on extinction of dinosaurs


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#16    Insight

Insight

    Soldier of the New World Re-order

  • Member
  • 2,844 posts
  • Joined:18 Nov 2004
  • Location:Right here!

  • When the people fight against the elite, it's an act of terror.
    When the elite terrorizes the people, it's called justice.

Posted 03 December 2004 - 10:02 AM

My theory is that a massive world wise flood occurred when the springs of the ocean opened up because of tectonic disturbance. After the waters dissipated, the atmosphere drastically changed. If you examine what the world would be like before such an event, the atmospheric pressure would have been so great, that oxygen would actually be forced into your bloodstream. This atmosphere would be far more accomodating to a 100ft tall beast.

This could also explain why in the past, humans supposedly grew larger in mass, and lived longer.

After this flood, the atmosphere worn thin, and the larger beasts died off, unable to adapt. The flood would explain the water errosion on the sphinx, and also why we find fossils of aquatic life at very high mountain altitudes. Maybe it would even account for why we have so many fossils to begin with.

When the people fight against the elite, it's an act of terror.
When the elite terrorizes the people, it's called justice.


Evil wears many masks, but none so dangerous as the mask of virtue.

#17    4dplane

4dplane

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 493 posts
  • Joined:12 May 2004

  • To study where I stand, teaches me what I have been missing.

Posted 03 December 2004 - 10:50 AM

Your talking about this right?
http://www.godandscience.org/youngearth/canopy.html
http://www.harrypottermagic.org/Evolution%...hapter%2007.htm
thumbsup.gif

Edited by 4dplane, 03 December 2004 - 10:50 AM.

Any belief is a self protecting device through which the mind disconnects itself from truth. Only a mind that is free from any anticipation, hope, and belief can act justly and in alliance with truth and reality.
-Krishnamurti

Most people are bothered by those passages of Scripture they do not understand, but the passages that bother me are those I do understand.
-Mark Twan

#18    crazyacorn

crazyacorn

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Joined:24 Feb 2005

Posted 24 February 2005 - 02:41 AM

I simply believe that dinosaurs were unable to adapt to a drastic change in their environment, Darwin theory on Evalution


#19    Zepher_One

Zepher_One

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2004

Posted 24 February 2005 - 03:37 PM

QUOTE(dddduck @ Nov 23 2004, 02:26 PM)
Simply, your theory is overpopulation led to extinction. But, our experience is that although animal overpopulation leads to die outs significantly reducing populations, it rarely reads to extinction. Populations usually stabilize at environmentally sustainable levels.

View Post

alien.gif Heres what i found some of the reasons for Extinctions of the Dionsaurs:   Changing Climate, Greenhouse effect, Excessive Size, Desease and Epidemic, Starvation, Egg predation, Non-viable eggs, Ecological replacement by Mammals, Reversal in the Earths Magnitic fields, and Super Nova in near by space, could of been due to any one of these disasters? There is still a debate going on as to why?  Zepher_one!

Attached Files



#20    Loaded_Revolver

Loaded_Revolver

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 127 posts
  • Joined:23 Feb 2005
  • Location:New Jersey

Posted 25 February 2005 - 08:32 PM

I don't think any one thing caused the extinction.

Careful examination of the fossil record shows a decline in population before the asteroid hit. Between disease, the global enviromental changes, evolution itself, it was bound to happen... They had a 170 million year run, their time came.

It wasn't the first, or even the biggest, mass extinction, it happens.


#21    Zepher_One

Zepher_One

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2004

Posted 26 February 2005 - 12:50 AM

QUOTE(crazyacorn @ Feb 23 2005, 10:41 PM)
I simply believe that dinosaurs were unable to adapt to a drastic change in their environment, Darwin theory on Evalution

View Post


alien.gif That is a possiability also, but the debate still rages as to why???? thumbsup.gif

Attached Files



#22    Zepher_One

Zepher_One

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2004

Posted 26 February 2005 - 12:52 AM

QUOTE(Loaded_Revolver @ Feb 25 2005, 04:32 PM)
I don't think any one thing caused the extinction.

Careful examination of the fossil record shows a decline in population before the asteroid hit. Between disease, the global enviromental changes, evolution itself, it was bound to happen... They had a 170 million year run, their time came.

It wasn't the first, or even the biggest, mass extinction, it happens.

View Post

alien.gif Another good reason i'd say!

Attached Files



#23    I am me

I am me

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,115 posts
  • Joined:28 Dec 2004

Posted 28 February 2005 - 06:33 PM

QUOTE(Dowdy @ Dec 3 2004, 01:48 AM)
Nature has a way of adapting to such situations.

Take Australia for example...
We have alot of bush fires here and with all the bush fires we've had you'd think that all the trees would be burnt down by now. Buy nature has adapted. We have trees that have seeds that respond to fires - ie. when one of those trees are buring, it's seeds gets released. So although that tree may of died it released enough seeds for 3-4 more trees to grow.

View Post



good point.  nature tends to take care of itself.  preventing natural forest fires is actually a bad thing.  brush tends to build up and up and up and eventually it will fuel a huge fire.  nature usually runs its course and everything cycles.

i don't think there were billions of these huge dinosaurs all over the world.  there probably were herds of them just like there are herds of elephants and things like that now.  think of all the buffalo that used to live in the USA before humans killed them off.  they never ate all of the grass, but that seems like all they do...just eat grass and crap.  the dinosaurs will eat in one area and move on allowing the area to regrow.


#24    Zepher_One

Zepher_One

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2004

Posted 28 February 2005 - 07:47 PM

[attachmentid=12244]
QUOTE(I am me @ Feb 28 2005, 02:33 PM)
QUOTE(Dowdy @ Dec 3 2004, 01:48 AM)
Nature has a way of adapting to such situations.

Take Australia for example...
We have alot of bush fires here and with all the bush fires we've had you'd think that all the trees would be burnt down by now. Buy nature has adapted. We have trees that have seeds that respond to fires - ie. when one of those trees are buring, it's seeds gets released. So although that tree may of died it released enough seeds for 3-4 more trees to grow.

View Post



good point.  nature tends to take care of itself.  preventing natural forest fires is actually a bad thing.  brush tends to build up and up and up and eventually it will fuel a huge fire.  nature usually runs its course and everything cycles.

i don't think there were billions of these huge dinosaurs all over the world.  there probably were herds of them just like there are herds of elephants and things like that now.  think of all the buffalo that used to live in the USA before humans killed them off.  they never ate all of the grass, but that seems like all they do...just eat grass and crap.  the dinosaurs will eat in one area and move on allowing the area to regrow.

View Post

alien.gif More than likely to move on to find new resources for food! Seeing they ate all there was in that area.. These are Huge dinosaurs which require a mass quanity of food espically those being vegetarians.

Attached Files



#25    panther10758

panther10758

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,215 posts
  • Joined:28 Aug 2004
  • Location:CA

  • Any man can become a Father it takes a REAL MAN to be a DAD!

Posted 01 March 2005 - 12:32 AM

Dinosaurs had very small brains and could little other than to eat sleep and reproduce it would be tough for them to survive at all. running out of food would be one problem as they ate everything and this would impact T-Rex and others who relied on them for their food


#26    draconic chronicler

draconic chronicler

    Majestic 12 Operative

  • Banned
  • 6,229 posts
  • Joined:27 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 24 September 2005 - 02:37 PM

We've heard that theory before, but it doesn't explain why the small dinosaurs also  died out, yet turtles, snake, crocs, turtles, small mammals and birds survived.

Remember too that some very huge mammals took the place of the huge dinosaurs, and accoridng to this theory the same process would be repeated again.




#27    saladins follower

saladins follower

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 542 posts
  • Joined:27 Jun 2005

  • screw bush,im going back to africa

Posted 24 September 2005 - 02:56 PM

man and i have trouble eating a mcdonalds burger  laugh.gif  laugh.gif


#28    iaapac

iaapac

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,422 posts
  • Joined:02 Mar 2005

  • The only difference between genius and ignorance is that genius has a limit

Posted 24 September 2005 - 03:16 PM

The overpopulation theory has been examined extensively, especially at Kings College and found to contain too many variables to be considered as valid.  

What is more likely is that the earth shifted poles.  The prime evidences for this is the magnetism of rocks wherein lava deposits prove that there have been a mnimum of eleven polar shifts in history and that New York was once the area of the North Pole.

The second prime evidence is a baby mammoth discovered in the 30s (as I recall) and studied at the University of Leningrad.  This animal had been quick frozen . . . . some estimates said that it died within 20 seconds . . . . and in its stomach and throat where fresh flowers.  

That means that this beast was feeding in the springtime when sudden icy winds, estimated at 200 miles per hour, froze it where it stood.
Polar alterations cause such winds.

Polar shifting most likely requires the triggering of a cosmic event.  Some theories suggest the over-weighting of the poles but that cannot be substantiated by physics.  It is apparent, however, that the shifting of poles has occurred and rather regularly through the history of the earth.



#29    Essan

Essan

    Recruitment Agent for the 'B' Ark

  • Member
  • 2,332 posts
  • Joined:18 Mar 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The other side

  • Stop Climate Change: Plant a Rain Forest Today!

Posted 24 September 2005 - 03:31 PM

Quote



The second prime evidence is a baby mammoth discovered in the 30s (as I recall) and studied at the University of Leningrad.  This animal had been quick frozen . . . . some estimates said that it died within 20 seconds . . . . and in its stomach and throat where fresh flowers.  

That means that this beast was feeding in the springtime when sudden icy winds, estimated at 200 miles per hour, froze it where it stood.
Polar alterations cause such winds.



I challenge you to find a single scientific report confirming any of the above original.gif

The baby mammoth was presumable Dima - which appears to have drowned in a river around 41,000 years ago....

Andy

Weather & Earth Science News
The independent climate blog

#30    iaapac

iaapac

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,422 posts
  • Joined:02 Mar 2005

  • The only difference between genius and ignorance is that genius has a limit

Posted 24 September 2005 - 03:53 PM

Quote


I challenge you to find a single scientific report confirming any of the above original.gif

The baby mammoth was presumable Dima - which appears to have drowned in a river around 41,000 years ago....



No, Dima and another juvenile mammoth were discovered in 1977 and 1988 respectively and were not in a frozen state, rather they were "mummified" and have been on exhibition in Helsinki for several years.

References to the mammorth I mentioned:

Stone, R., Siberian mammoth find raises hopes, questions, Science 286:876–877, 1999.
Sarfati, J., Mammoths—riddle of the Ice Age, Creation 22(2):10–15, 2000; p. 11.
Guthrie, R.D., Frozen Fauna of the Mammoth Steppe—The Story of Blue Babe, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL, 1990.  
Howorth, H.H., The Mammoth and the Flood—An Attempt to Confront the Theory of Uniformity with the Facts of Recent Geology, Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, London, p. 54, 1887, reproduced by The Sourcebook Project, Glen Arm, MD.
Baryshnikov, G., Haynes, G. and Klimowicz, J., Mammoths and the mammoth fauna: introduction to the studies of an extinct ecosystem; in: Haynes et al., Ref. 9, p. 5.  
Howorth, H.H., The mammoths in Siberia, Geological Magazine 7:550–561, 1880.  
Digby, B., The Mammoth and Mammoth-Hunting in North-East Siberia, H.F. & G. Witherby, London, p. 14, 1926.    
Farrand, W.R., Frozen mammoths and modern geology, Science 133:729–735, 1961; p. 733.  
Vereshchagin, N.K., The mammoth ‘cemeteries’ of north-east Siberia, Polar Record 17(106):3–12, 1974; p. 3.    
Alroy, J., Putting North America’s end-Pleistocene megafaunal extinction in context; in: MacPhee, D.E. (ed.), Extinctions in Near Time—Causes, Contexts, and Consequences, Kluwar Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY, pp. 105–143, 1999; p. 105.  
Velikovsky, I., Worlds in Collision, Pocket Books, New York, NY, 1950.  
Velikovsky, I., Earth in Upheaval, Doubleday & Co., New York, NY, 1955.  
Velikovsky, Ref. 58, p. 13.  
Hapgood, C.H., Earth’s Shifting Crust—A Key to Some Basic Problems of Earth Science, Pantheon Books, New York, NY, 1958.  
Hapgood, C.H., The Path of the Pole, Chilton Book Co., New York, NY, 1970.  
Ginenthal, C., The Extinction of the Mammoth, Forest Hills, New York, NY, 1997.  
Ukraintseva, V.V., Vegetation Cover and Environment of the ‘Mammoth Epoch’ in Siberia, Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, South Dakota Inc., Hot Springs, SD, pp. 80–98, 1993.  
Mithen, S., Simulating mammoth hunting and extinction: implications for the Late Pleistocene of the Central Russian Plain; in: Peterkin, G.L., Bricker, H.M. and Mellars, P. (eds)

I did a paper on this several years ago and still had the references.  Sorry for the overkill but maybe you'll find it interesting.







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users