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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#10366    Knul

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 02:04 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 20 February 2012 - 11:12 AM, said:

Yes, it appears the copying was done in a hurry when you consider the many mistakes and spelling errors and things that were left/forgotten.

But this I don't get: you said, "the Pre-Roman old Frisians used the Roman decimals". No they didn't they used decimals, not Roman decimals. Even their ciphers are based on the decimal system ( = based on 10 ), but the way they are written is obviously based on the medieval Hindu-Arab ciphers.

I think it were the Gauls who used a sytem based on 20: a remnant of that system can still be found in for instance French: quatre-vingt = 4 x 20 = 80. I think the Germans already used the decimal system during or before Roman times.

++++++


EDIT:

Dunno, but I think I was wrong with Germans using the decimal system (base 10):

http://en.wikipedia....simal#In_Europe

The vigesimal system appears to have been widely used all over Europe.

.

According to the OLB the Frisians were there long before the Gauls, the Celts and the Romans. How could they use the vigesimal Gallic or Roman decimal system ? As far as the Gauls are concerned. Didn't they derive their name from Gallus = Haan ?

Edited by Knul, 20 February 2012 - 02:05 PM.


#10367    Abramelin

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 02:22 PM

View PostKnul, on 20 February 2012 - 02:04 PM, said:

According to the OLB the Frisians were there long before the Gauls, the Celts and the Romans. How could they use the vigesimal Gallic or Roman decimal system ? As far as the Gauls are concerned. Didn't they derive their name from Gallus = Haan ?

You can find people using the vigesimal system all over the world and in ancient time (10 fingers + 10 toes = 20 digits).

And you keep saying "Roman decimal system", but I'm sure you mean "decimal system".

=

Gauls from Gallus is nothing but 'folk etymology', later adopted by the French.


#10368    Abramelin

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 04:19 PM

Gallic

1670s, from L. Gallicus "pertaining to Gaul or the Gauls," from L. Gallia "Gaul" and Gallus "a Gaul" from a native Celtic name (see Gaelic), though some connect the word with prehistoric W.Gmc. *walkhoz "foreigners" (see Welsh). Originally used in English rhetorically or mockingly for "French." The rooster as a symbol of France is based on the pun of Gallus "a Gaul" and L. gallus "rooster."

http://www.etymonlin...p?search=gallus


From the OLB:

Tha Gola, alsa heton tha saendalinga prestera Sydon-is.
Dutch:    De Gola, alzo heten de zendeling priesters Sydon's.
English: The Gola, as the missionary priests of Sydon were called.



תרנגול (tarnegól) m.

Of Sumerian: Tarlugal (Bird of the King), loaned by Assyrian and onwards to Talmudic Hebrew.

1.rooster, c.ock, chicken

http://en.wiktionary...ki/תרנגול

.

Edited by Abramelin, 20 February 2012 - 05:16 PM.


#10369    Abramelin

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 06:43 PM

60 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 59 guests, 1 anonymous users
.

59 guests, Otharus.... think, please.

And that one 'anonymous' user is ME.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 20 February 2012 - 06:44 PM.


#10370    Knul

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:00 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 20 February 2012 - 04:19 PM, said:

Gallic

1670s, from L. Gallicus "pertaining to Gaul or the Gauls," from L. Gallia "Gaul" and Gallus "a Gaul" from a native Celtic name (see Gaelic), though some connect the word with prehistoric W.Gmc. *walkhoz "foreigners" (see Welsh). Originally used in English rhetorically or mockingly for "French." The rooster as a symbol of France is based on the pun of Gallus "a Gaul" and L. gallus "rooster."

http://www.etymonlin...p?search=gallus


From the OLB:

Tha Gola, alsa heton tha saendalinga prestera Sydon-is.
Dutch:    De Gola, alzo heten de zendeling priesters Sydon's.
English: The Gola, as the missionary priests of Sydon were called.



תרנגול (tarnegól) m.

Of Sumerian: Tarlugal (Bird of the King), loaned by Assyrian and onwards to Talmudic Hebrew.

1.rooster, c.ock, chicken

http://en.wiktionary...%92%D7%95%D7%9C

.

I came across a very interesting publication on the item Gola Gallus. s. http://books.google....iesters&f=false see page 162 line 2 and 5, which will certainly clarify the matter. When you look at this book, please have a look on page 5 (*) as well about the name of the Celts and Gauls. On page 39 the flood of 1220 BC is mentioned. Unfortunately the book is in Dutch.


GALLUS (Γάλλος: Lefke), a small river of Bithynia, having its sources near Modra in the north of Phrygia, and emptying itself into the Sangarius a little more than 300 stadia from Nicomedeia, (Strab. xii. p.543.) Ammianus Marcellinus describes its course as very winding (26.8). Martianus Capella (6.687, ed. Kopp) confounds this river with another of the same name in Galatia, which seems likewise to have been a tributary of the Sangarius, and on the banks of which Pessinus is said to have been situated, From the river Gallus in Galatia the Galli, or priests of Cybele, were said by some to have derived their name, because its water made those who drank of it mad. (Steph. B. sub voce Plin. Nat. 5.42, 6.1, 31.5; Herodian, 1.11; Ov. Fast. 4.364.)  s. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, illustrated by numerous engravings on wood. William Smith, LLD. London. Walton and Maberly, Upper Gower Street and Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row; John Murray, Albemarle Street. 1854.

In: Lacus Curtius: http://penelope.uchi...GRA*/Galli.html

Galli
Article by Leonhard Schmitz, Ph.D., F.R.S.E., Rector of the High School of Edinburgh
on pp566‑567 of


William Smith, D.C.L., LL.D.:
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, John Murray, London, 1875.

<p class="start justify">GALLI, the priests of Cybele, whose worship was introduced at Rome from Phrygia, in B.C. 204 (Liv. XXIX.10, 14, XXXVI.36). The Galli were, according to an ancient custom, always castrated (spadones, semimares, semivir, nec viri nec feminae), and it would seem that impelled by religious fanaticism they performed this operation on themselves (Juv. VI.512, &c.; Ovid, Fast. IV.237; Martial, III.81, XI.74; Plin. H. N. XI.49). In their wild, enthusiastic, and boisterous rites, they resembled the Corybantes (Lucan. I.565, &c.; compare Hilaria), and even went further, in as much, as in their fury, they mutilated their own bodies (Propert. II.18.15). They seem to have been always chosen from a poor and despised class of people, for while no other priests were allowed to beg, the Galli (famuli Idaeae matris) were allowed to do so on certain days (Cic. de Leg. II.9and 16). The chief priest among them was called archigallus (Servius, ad Aen. IX.116). The origin of the name of Galli is uncertain; according to Festus, (s.v.), Ovid (Fast. IV.363), and others, it was derived from the river Gallus in Phrygia, which flowed near the temple of Cybele, and the water of which was fabled to put those persons who drank of it into such a state of madness, that they castrated themselves (Compare Plin. H. N. V.42, XI.40, XXXI.2; Herodian. 11). The supposition of Hieronymus (Cap. Oseae, 4) that Galli was the name of the Gauls, which had been given to these priests by the Romans in order to show their contempt of that nation, is unfounded, as the Romans must have received the name from Asia, or from the Greeks, by whom, as Suidas (s.v.) informs us, Gallus was used as a common noun in the sense of eunuch. There exists a verb gallare, which signifies to rage (insanare, bacchari), and p567which occurs in one of the fragments of Varro (p273, ed. Bip.) and in the Antholog. Lat. vol. I p34, ed. Burmann.


THERE IS NOTHING THAT REFERS GALLUS TO GOLEM.

Edited by Knul, 21 February 2012 - 01:19 AM.


#10371    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:04 AM

View PostKnul, on 21 February 2012 - 01:00 AM, said:

I came across a very interesting publication on the item Gola Gallus. s. http://books.google....iesters&f=false see page 162 line 2 and 5, which will certainly clarify the matter. When you look at this book, please have a look on page 5 (*) as well about the name of the Celts and Gauls. On page 39 the flood of 1220 BC is mentioned. Unfortunately the book is in Dutch.


GALLUS (Γάλλος: Lefke), a small river of Bithynia, having its sources near Modra in the north of Phrygia, and emptying itself into the Sangarius a little more than 300 stadia from Nicomedeia, (Strab. xii. p.543.) Ammianus Marcellinus describes its course as very winding (26.8). Martianus Capella (6.687, ed. Kopp) confounds this river with another of the same name in Galatia, which seems likewise to have been a tributary of the Sangarius, and on the banks of which Pessinus is said to have been situated, From the river Gallus in Galatia the Galli, or priests of Cybele, were said by some to have derived their name, because its water made those who drank of it mad. (Steph. B. sub voce Plin. Nat. 5.42, 6.1, 31.5; Herodian, 1.11; Ov. Fast. 4.364.)  s. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, illustrated by numerous engravings on wood. William Smith, LLD. London. Walton and Maberly, Upper Gower Street and Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row; John Murray, Albemarle Street. 1854.

In: Lacus Curtius: http://penelope.uchi...GRA*/Galli.html

Galli
Article by Leonhard Schmitz, Ph.D., F.R.S.E., Rector of the High School of Edinburgh
on pp566‑567 of


William Smith, D.C.L., LL.D.:
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, John Murray, London, 1875.

<p class="start justify">GALLI, the priests of Cybele, whose worship was introduced at Rome from Phrygia, in B.C. 204 (Liv. XXIX.10, 14, XXXVI.36). The Galli were, according to an ancient custom, always castrated (spadones, semimares, semivir, nec viri nec feminae), and it would seem that impelled by religious fanaticism they performed this operation on themselves (Juv. VI.512, &c.; Ovid, Fast. IV.237; Martial, III.81, XI.74; Plin. H. N. XI.49). In their wild, enthusiastic, and boisterous rites, they resembled the Corybantes (Lucan. I.565, &c.; compare Hilaria), and even went further, in as much, as in their fury, they mutilated their own bodies (Propert. II.18.15). They seem to have been always chosen from a poor and despised class of people, for while no other priests were allowed to beg, the Galli (famuli Idaeae matris) were allowed to do so on certain days (Cic. de Leg. II.9and 16). The chief priest among them was called archigallus (Servius, ad Aen. IX.116). The origin of the name of Galli is uncertain; according to Festus, (s.v.), Ovid (Fast. IV.363), and others, it was derived from the river Gallus in Phrygia, which flowed near the temple of Cybele, and the water of which was fabled to put those persons who drank of it into such a state of madness, that they castrated themselves (Compare Plin. H. N. V.42, XI.40, XXXI.2; Herodian. 11). The supposition of Hieronymus (Cap. Oseae, 4) that Galli was the name of the Gauls, which had been given to these priests by the Romans in order to show their contempt of that nation, is unfounded, as the Romans must have received the name from Asia, or from the Greeks, by whom, as Suidas (s.v.) informs us, Gallus was used as a common noun in the sense of eunuch. There exists a verb gallare, which signifies to rage (insanare, bacchari), and p567which occurs in one of the fragments of Varro (p273, ed. Bip.) and in the Antholog. Lat. vol. I p34, ed. Burmann.


THERE IS NOTHING THAT REFERS GALLUS TO GOLEM.

Interesting book, Menno.

However, the flood you say happened in 1220 BC most probably happened 1220 years after the Creation; it doesn't say BC (or "voor Christus" in Dutch).


And yes, I don't think GOLEM will really bring us any further.

But I think the link between the OLB "GOLA" from Sidon are/were the Jews.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 08:59 AM.


#10372    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:51 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 14 February 2011 - 07:47 PM, said:

Something better (and I already posted about the next guy in post 463, page 31):


-In 1999 pubiceerde Joël Vandemaele  in zijn boek "Controversiele Geschiedenis" zijn onderzoek naar de plaatsen die genoemd worden in het Oera Linda Boek, in relatie tot plaatsen in het huidige Noord Frankrijk en West-Vlaanderen. Mede gebaseerd op de studies van Albert Delahay en anderen. (zie kaart)

In his book "Controversial History" (1999), Joel Vandemaele published his research on the places mentioned in the Oera Linda Book, in relation to current locations in present Northern France and Western Flanders. Partly based on the studies of Albert Delahay and others. (see map)


Posted Image

http://home.planet.n....5.atlantis.htm


==

-J.Vandemaele vermeldt één plaatsbepaling in het OLB van Atlantis, "Ons voormalige westland, rechtover Brittannia gelegen" De plaatsbepaling correspondeert met Oud-Frisia "usque ad Armorem" uit Karel de Grote's Lex Frisonum, nl. tot aan Bretagne met de nederzetting van Kerenak of Carnac, waar "het goud van de Golen verzameld was, dat Askar uit OLB ging roven".

J. Vandemaele lists one location of Atlantis in the OLB, "Our former Westland, located directly opposite Britannia". The location corresponds to Old Frisia 'usque ad Armorem" from Charlemagne's Lex Frisonum, namely up to Brittany with the settlement Kerenak or Carnac, where "the gold of the Gauls had been collected, which  Askar from the OLB was going to rob"


http://www.kunstgeog.../atlantis05.htm

Joël Vandemaele, "Controversiele Geschiedenis" :

http://www.mens-en-c...hiedschrijving/

.


I discovered Vandemeale's location of "Atlantis" (oh, help...not again) is based on either a misspelling, or on cleverly adding one extra letter...

There is no "usque ad Armorem" to be found in Charlemagne's Lex Frisionum (and not "Frisonum").

http://www.keesn.nl/lex/
http://www.keesn.nl/...lex_en_text.htm
http://en.wikipedia....i/Lex_Frisionum

But there is an "usque ad Amorem" :

http://www.keesn.nl/ewaadamorem/

The Amor area has nothing to do with Armorica as Vandemaele wants it to be:

Posted Image

.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 10:53 AM.


#10373    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 04:05 PM

I have often wondered why nothing about the ancient history and myths of Ireland shows up in the OLB...


Well, maybe because the OLB.... had an Irish predecessor??

Chronicles of Eri: being the history of the Gaal Sciot Iber/ Volume 1 - Roger O'Connor, 1822

http://books.google....q=dover&f=false

This O'Connor claims to have found very ancient manuscripts....

Attached File  CHRONICLES_OF_ ERI - OCONNOR.jpg   35.3K   9 downloads

Attached File  CHRONICLES_OF_ERI2.jpg   79.75K   8 downloads

And I found it by accident because I was looking for an English translation of this German book that was published in 1887 (use Google Translator):

Die Gaelischen Annalen. Nach der Übertragung O'Connor's (Gebundene Ausgabe)

http://www.amazon.de...w/RVD9LS6GL50J2

Armanen Verlag, ca. 96 Seiten, Faksimile-Ausgabe der 2. Auflage von 1887

5000 Jahre vorgeschichtliche Chronik der Kelten. Aus den geheimen Aufzeichnungen einer irischen Sippe
von O'Connor, mit Erläuterungen von Wilhelm Obermüller
Armanen

Wohl eine der größten Raritäten auf dem antiquarischen Buchmarkt sind die zuletzt im Jahr 1887 in Wien erschienenen 'Gaelischen Annalen' nach der Übertragung O'Connors. Es handelt sich bei diesen 'Jahrbüchern der Gaelag' um eine uralte Chronik altkeltischer bzw. vorkeltischer Stämme, die eine ebenso abenteuerliche Geschichte hinter sich haben, und denen auch eine ähnliche Bedeutung zukommt wie der berühmten 'Ura-Linda-Chronik' in der Übertragung von Prof. Hermann Wirth.

Da diese Jahrbücher weit in die vorchristliche Zeit vorgreifen, erhellen sie weithin unbekannte Teile der alt- bzw. vorkeltischen Stammes- und Siedlungsgeschichte, verbunden mit genauen Angaben der Regierungszeiten und Namen der Herrscherhäuser, der Sitten und des Brauchtums, in den Räumen Großbritanniens, Vorderasiens, des Kaukasus bis hin nach Spanien und dem Baskenlande.
In diesen Jahrbüchern, die mit dem Jahre 1006 v. Chr (BC). abschließen, erscheinen nur, auf das genaueste eingetragen, wichtigste Ereignisse, wie z.B. der Durchbruch der Landenge von Calais, wodurch sich der 'Ärmelkanal' bildete, u.v.a.


+++++++++++++++

EDIT:

The next may give you a headache, but it is about the contents of this book:



Chronicles of Eri: History of the Gaal Sciot Iber or the Irish People, translated from the original Manuscripts (1822):

CONTENTS: A demonstration, vol. 1, pp.i-cccxii; The Writings of Eolus, vol. 1, pp.1-99 [conclusion of chronicle of Gaelag]. Demonstration contains sects. 1] a demonstration of the original seat, nations, and tribes of the Scythian race. 2] from the eariest accounts of the existence of this earth to the founding of Babel 3] from the dismemberment of the anc. Scyhtin empire, and the building of Bab-el by the Assyrians, in 246, to the expulsion of the shepherd chiefs from Egypt, and their arrival in Pelesgia and Ceropeia, in about 1100 before Christ. 4] Of all the Scythian tribes that emigrated to the Isles of the Gentiles, south of the Ister, from the Euxine, East to the Rhoetian Alps, and Panonia West to the extremity of Greece South, from the year 2170 to the birth of Christ. 5] Of the Scythian tribes that colonised th districts of Europe, from the western extremity of Itlay, and the Rhoetian Alps, to the German Ocean, between the rivers Danube, and Rhin, north and the Garonne south. 6] Of the Goths 7] Of the Scythian sidonians in Spain 8] Of the Scythian tribes in the Isle of Britain 10] Of all the nations of Europe, antecedently to the invasion of the Scythians. 11] Of the Manners, Customs, Original Institutions, and Religion of the Scythian race 12] Of the language of the Scythian Race. Conclusion, cccxlix [continuous roman pagination in two vols.] Dedicatory letter to Sir Francis Burdett, speaks of putting evidence of the ‘the last conspiracy against my life and honour, by agents of an oligarchy’ and the revolution; ‘the iron-hand of despotism; seeks a ‘fostering hand’ for his children; also speaks of ‘my gallant boy’ into whose hands Burdett placed his first weapon with instructions to use it against ‘tyranny and oppression’; ‘your never-failing advocacy and vindication of the Irish people, has endeared you to all our hearts.’ [v] Preface: fourth attempt … to present to the world a faithful history of my country … immured in prison … 1798 and 1799 charged by the oligarchy of English with the foul crime of treason, because I would not disgrace my name by the acceptance of an earldom and a pension, to b paid by the peopl whom I was courted to desert, and because I resisted every art to induce me to become a traitor to my beloved Eri … Fort George, Scotland … again writing’. He gives an account of the successive destructions of the manuscript. He reports that a third version perished with his belongings in the fire at the castle of Dangan in 1809. ‘[of] l iberty we wild Irish have none to lose’ [ix] Burdett arrives in Ireland, 1817. ‘This history is a literal translation into the English tongue (from the Phoenician dialect of the Scythian language) of the ancient manuscripts which have, fortunately for the world, been preserved through so many ages, chances and vicissitudes.’ [ix] ‘… I do not presume to affirm that the very skins, whether of sheep or of goats, are of a date so old as the events recorded; but this I will assert, that they must be faithful transcripts from the most ancient records; it not being within the range of possibility, either from their style, language, or contents, tht they could have been forged’ [ix] Comments on FLOOD: ‘So fully sensible was a man of Ireland, who far surpassed all his contemporaries, and in truth, most men, I allude to Henry Flood, that if encouragement were given to bring to light and investigate ancient records of Ireland, still existing, that would be the means of diffusing great knowledge of the antique world … so convinced was he, I say, of this fact, by means of deep reseaches he had made, that he bequathd the whole of his large possessions for the purpose of instituting professorships in the Univ. of Dublin, for th perpetuation of the Irish lande, and the purchase of manuscripts therein. In this magnificent design, his views were unfortunately frustrated by the contemptible policy of an incubus that hath long over-lain unhappy Eri; for, a claimant was set up to the estates of the philosophic doctor, to who they were accordingly decreed!’ […] O’CONNOR, Paris, 1821. On p.vi of his first chapter, O’Connor introduces his narrator, Eolus, who lived 50 years later than Moses, and was chief of the Gaal or Sciot of Iber within Gaelag, between 1368 and 1335 b.c. There is much reliance on Herodotus, Strabo, Thucydides, Polybius, etc. [Compares modern day writers to ‘the manner of Anglo Irish juries, who submit their oath to the arbitrament of chance © lxxi; a note relates that in a case of damages, the value is fixed between the highest and lowest sum named by the Anglo-Irish jurymen on their oaths]. Throughout, O’Connor makes extensive use of analogies and homologies between Irish [i.e., Eri, dialect of the Scythians] and Greek and Roman names. For instance, he glosses Greek Ogyges, ‘supposed to be an individual, a king of Attica, in 1766, before Christ: ‘Og-eag-eis, ‘the diminution of Og’s multitude’, the explanation heretofore given on this head, has, it is to be hoped, confuted all the fabulous relations, and demonstrated the fact; it is to be farther remarked, that the nae of Og-eag-ia hath been applied to Eri, from tradition, and frgments of old poems, at a time, and by men, who had no idea of founding s system thereon, but merely because th fact of the Gaal of Sciot having emigrated from Ib-er, which was one of the nations of Magh-Og, has never been lost sight of, and you will find by the chronicles of the Iberian races in Spain, they called themselves Og-eag-eis, and Noe-maid-eis.’ [clxxiii]. The name Bosphoros is glosses as ‘Cos-foras’, compound of Cos, or the foot, and Foras, a wa through or over the water [idem]; Maes-ia, glossed ‘Meas-iath, the land of acorns’ [clxxx]. On p.clxxxvii following he lists ‘a variety of words in th dialectics of Greece, Italy, and eri, of the same signification in all, wherefrom you will have an opportunity of witnessing that the dialects of greece and Eri bear a nearer resemblance to each other … &c’. Examples are Aggelos, Giola; Akrasia, Craos [gluttony]; airesis, airioch-seis [election]; amnes[t]ia, main-aide [out of mind]; eros, er [hero]; kalon, glan [neat]; kiste, ciste [chest]; lauros, go leor [abundant]; lithos, liath [stone]; phero, bear-im [I carry]; pornos, foirneadh [violent passion or inclination, i.e., adultery—O’Connor cites Matt. 5.28]; Selene, Sul-lu-aine-e, ‘It is the light of the lesser orb or ring’; Phos, fos [light]. Vol 1 contains the Chronicle of Gaelag, being prior to the arrival in Ireland. Eolus is made to count years of reigns as ‘rings’. Vol. 2 contains the Chronicles of Eri, Part II; commencing with ‘the annals of Eri’. A Frontispiece folding map shows Ireland with selection of ancient names inc. provinces. ‘What if this land, standing alone, an island, be called ERI for times to come? [7] … this place is too large for one chief’ [8] The final chapter of the narrative of Eolus takes events up to ‘the reign of Factna, the son of Cas, the son of Ruidhruide Mor king in Ulladh, Ardri, a space of one score and three years, from 30 to the year 7 before Christ.’ After a chronology extending across the full world-history involved, O’Connor ends:‘And now I take my leave for the present, wishing health and happiness to all the good people of the earth, and speedy amendmnt to the vicious; and if my health will prmit (I shall certainly carry the victory over my adverse circumstances), I hope early in the year that is to ensue, to present the world with a continuation of the history of my adored Eri.’ [End]



http://www.ricorso.n....htm#Chronicles


.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 04:30 PM.


#10374    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 05:34 PM

And here is the German translation/editon, published in 1838:

http://books.google....68 1335&f=false

+++

EDIT:

And you can download the original, 1822 Irish version from here:

17.5 MB (496 pages):
http://digital.nls.u...52/78526210.pdf

Attached File  CHRONICLES_OF_ERI3.jpg   93.52K   5 downloads

.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 06:04 PM.


#10375    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:40 PM

Attached File  CHRONICLES_OF_ERI4.jpg   157.02K   9 downloads

2170 BC.

Now that is conveniently close (a generation only) to the 2194 BC date.

+++++

EDIT:

Are there no Irish (or Scots) around to comment on this book written/published by O'Connor in 1822 ??

It is YOUR early version of the "Oera Linda Book", ok?

.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 06:53 PM.


#10376    cormac mac airt

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 07:53 PM

Quote

It is YOUR early version of the "Oera Linda Book", ok?

Much like every other post-Christianized version of Ancient Irish history to the time of Christ, it's a work of fiction. OK?

cormac

The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#10377    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:00 PM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 21 February 2012 - 07:53 PM, said:

Much like every other post-Christianized version of Ancient Irish history to the time of Christ, it's a work of fiction. OK?

cormac

Yes, I agree, but the difference is this: O'Conner claims to have translated from ancient manuscripts ("Phoenician/Scythic"), about 40 years before Cornelis Over de Linden claimed something similar with his ancient "family chronicle".

Even the date of the Deluge according to O'Connor is close to the OLB date of 2194 BC (2170 BC).

To me it seems an Over de Linden got inspired by O'Connors fabrication of ancient Irish history.

Frisians vs. Hollanders

Irish vs. English.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 08:11 PM.


#10378    Abramelin

Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:19 PM

Look at the birds.... they fly and fly, and they dont give a flying **** about our pity problems.

Are they careless? No, of course they are not.

We are just not that 'important' to them at all.

And that is the thought to end this day, my compadres.

We are nothing but sht.

Dung.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 09:33 PM.


#10379    cormac mac airt

cormac mac airt

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:35 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 21 February 2012 - 08:00 PM, said:

Yes, I agree, but the difference is this: O'Conner claims to have translated from ancient manuscripts ("Phoenician/Scythic"), about 40 years before Cornelis Over de Linden claimed something similar with his ancient "family chronicle".

Even the date of the Deluge according to O'Connor is close to the OLB date of 2194 BC (2170 BC).

To me it seems an Over de Linden got inspired by O'Connors fabrication of ancient Irish history.

Frisians vs. Hollanders

Irish vs. English.

.

Yeah, and O'Conner's claims are just as meaningless since there's no evidence these ancient manuscripts ever existed. But basing one fabrication off of another? Yeah, why not?

cormac

The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#10380    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:50 PM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 21 February 2012 - 09:35 PM, said:

Yeah, and O'Conner's claims are just as meaningless since there's no evidence these ancient manuscripts ever existed. But basing one fabrication off of another? Yeah, why not?

cormac

Hello. I do know O'Connors claims are meaningless.

I just wanted to say..... oh, never mind.

Cormac. I really AM a skeptic.

But.. I am not a prick.

I have my moments of fantasy, please excuse me.

But there is the difference: I DO know I am having a fantasy.

And that is contrary to what many others here post as their 'beliesf'.

I have NO belief. I DOUBT.

And that is why I often talk from where the sun doesnt shine.

Bye, and have a good sleep/

Edited by Abramelin, 21 February 2012 - 09:54 PM.