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Sun's Almost Perfectly Round Shape

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#1    Karlis

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 10:53 AM

The sun is nearly the roundest object ever measured.
If scaled to the size of a beach ball, it would be so round that the difference between the widest and narrow diameters would be much less than the width of a human hair.

The sun rotates every 28 days, and because it doesn't have a solid surface, it should be slightly flattened. This tiny flattening has been studied with many instruments for almost 50 years to learn about the sun's rotation, especially the rotation below its surface, which we can't see directly.
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#2    jacobstiles

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 03:38 PM

Unless you find a way to deform the sun, or it's going to stay like that. How's that weird


#3    Karlis

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 04:22 PM

View Postjacobstiles, on 18 August 2012 - 03:38 PM, said:

Unless you find a way to deform the sun, or it's going to stay like that. How's that weird
Regarding your question, jacobstiles:
"How's that weird"?

Answer:
Planets and stars rotate. Our sun rotates on its axis once every 28 days. Rotation causes a bulge at the equator. Scientists are perplexed, and are attempting to find an explanation as to why our sun does not bulge at its "equator".

As the article states:

The sun rotates every 28 days, and because it doesn't have a solid surface, it should be slightly flattened ...




#4    jacobstiles

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 04:25 PM

it's how nature works, who good does it do to human society, even natural society exploring why the sun is too stubborn to flatten out. Seriously?


#5    Nasty Gash

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 05:02 PM

View Postjacobstiles, on 18 August 2012 - 04:25 PM, said:

it's how nature works, who good does it do to human society, even natural society exploring why the sun is too stubborn to flatten out. Seriously?

I was about to faceplant until I realized that no one could be so willingly ignorant as not to understand the value of knowledge, even knowledge about that which one has no interest.

Troll.  Has to be.



#6    jacobstiles

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 05:28 PM

If by valuable knowledge you mean spending time and resource to find out why sun refused to flatten out, you're right, troll it has to be.

I would not object to investigation as such, if the world is living in peace and comfort. Not even comfort, just enough to keep people from suffering, enough to keep the resource distribution balanced.

This, is a complete waste of valuable time + capital. There are far more urgent things that needs attention than this, the sun will survive the neglect, people won't.

Although if you insist that fulfilling our selfish curiosity should be a top priority, then I guess you can support the cause as u wish, I have nothing more to say to you.


#7    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 07:41 PM

Nasty Gash & jacobstiles, less of the bickering and name calling please. This is a site for civilised debate not childish tantrums and arguments.
Thank you.

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#8    Nasty Gash

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 10:50 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 18 August 2012 - 07:41 PM, said:

Nasty Gash & jacobstiles, less of the bickering and name calling please. This is a site for civilised debate not childish tantrums and arguments.
Thank you.

Waspie_Dwarf:

I don't believe that either of us resorted to name-calling.  Certainly jacobstiles did not.  I did use "troll" so perhaps you are correct.

I also used "willfully ignorant" but that was not directed at jacobstiles or anyone else, obviously, since a few words later I explained that I felt his OP was not serious. jacobstiles answered my response with a reasoned, rational explanation of why he felt money and effort were being wasted.  After reading his explanation,  I realize that his OP was NOT a troll and for that I publicly apologize.  I only wish that that explanation had been in his OP.

Thank you for your comments Waspie_Dwarf.  In future, I shall endeavor to be more mindful of the sensitivities of the members of this forum.

View Postjacobstiles, on 18 August 2012 - 05:28 PM, said:

I would not object to investigation as such, if the world is living in peace and comfort. Not even comfort, just enough to keep people from suffering, enough to keep the resource distribution balanced.

This, is a complete waste of valuable time + capital. There are far more urgent things that needs attention than this, the sun will survive the neglect, people won't.

jacobstiles:

I certainly agree with your first point!  Far too much effort and resources are wasted on endeavors that do not advance, but rather divide,  Humanity.  However, if Humans were not to satisfy their curiosity, there would be no advances that would advance Humanity.  What if early Humans were not curious about fire?  Were not curious about what was to be found on the other side of the ocean?  Where not curious about what they could do if they attached a few feathers and a sharp stone to a stick?  Would the computer and the internet that you are using now have been possible had curious individuals been stopped because others felt their endeavors a waste?  The fact that the sun does not bulge as would be expected is a puzzle.  Solving this puzzle probably would not cost very much, relative to the cost of the desired balancing of resource distribution that you and I both desire.  We don't know what might result from solving the puzzle.  It might lead to a technology that would help achieve that goal.  We won't know if we don't pursue an answer.  At the very minimum, an answer would add Human understanding of the Universe and that is never bad.


#9    ozman

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 07:01 AM

I am sure the gravity pushing inward and nuclear fusion pressure pushing outward causes balance and perfection.  If pressure is leaving from core outward and gravity is pushing hard on the outside then imperfections should get corrected automatically and a smooth balance should exist.

Look at white dwarfs and high gravity objects, i am prettys sure they are perfectly round.

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#10    notoverrated

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 02:30 AM

this doesn't surprise me.

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#11    woopypooky

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 03:40 AM

still not a 100% perfect circle.it shows you that God are not perfect


#12    ZaraKitty

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 04:11 AM

It's a huge ball of gas (paraphrasing btw) I see no reason for it to compress, do you know how hard it to to compress gas?!?!

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#13    Likely Guy

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 05:16 AM

View PostKarlis, on 17 August 2012 - 10:53 AM, said:

The sun is nearly the roundest object ever measured.
If scaled to the size of a beach ball, it would be so round that the difference between the widest and narrow diameters would be much less than the width of a human hair.

Yes. But if the Sun was the size of a beachball, the Earth would be the size of a pea. Then, how thick would a human hair be?

Or, at the other end of the scale, since the Sun is not a beachball, how wide would the human hair have to be? 1 km? 10 kms? 100 kms? ...and how big would the human be?

/i'm not expecting an answer to those questions, by the way. i know that a human hair is the 'constant'.

Edited by Likely Guy, 20 August 2012 - 05:25 AM.


#14    AmishHacker

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 09:30 AM

The Sun's size and mass make this discovery somewhat unsurprising.  Much of the comparison is made with Jupiter's bulge, but Jupiter spins rapidly, is much smaller, and is less massive than the Sun.  Its mass, by comparison, is 1.989x1030 while Jupiter's mass is only 1.898x1027 or less than 0.001 the mass of the Sun.  I wonder if the Sun's nuclear fusion process has anything to do with balancing its shape.

To me, this discovery falls in line with similar discoveries about our own world, especially our place in the HZ.  Its just, for lack of a better term, perfect. :-)

AmishHacker

Edited by AmishHacker, 20 August 2012 - 09:32 AM.

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#15    The Mule

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 11:02 PM

I'm no rocket appliance, but I'm gonna go with ....if its gravitational force is enough to keep 9 (maybe) planets in orbit...maybe its gravity is strong enough to negate the spinning bulge.

But then again...Im just a mule and cant figure out how any of it affects my life. I for one would rather have the stumped scientists work on something like ending world hunger or curing cancer.

Edited by The Mule, 20 August 2012 - 11:03 PM.

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