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Snowden (2009) berated government leaks


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#1    questionmark

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 08:49 PM

NY Times said:


Just four years before Edward J. Snowden set off an international firestorm by disclosing highly classified National Security Agency documents, someone using his screen name expressed outrage at government officials who leaked information to the news media, telling a friend in an Internet chat that leakers “should be shot,” according to chat logs made public on Wednesday by the technology news Web site Ars Technica, which hosted the exchanges.

“They’re just like WikiLeaks,” Mr. Snowden — or someone identified as him from his screen name and other details — wrote in January 2009 about an article in The New York Times on secret exchanges between Israel and the United States about Iran’s nuclear program.

Read more

et tu Brutus?

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#2    Babe Ruth

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 08:51 PM

If that's true and accurate, maybe he was trying to score brownie points and bolster his resume for Booz Allen?


#3    Bavarian Raven

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 10:41 PM

Or maybe, just maybe it wasn't him. Might have been the gov creating false info... or more then likely someone else with the same name ;)


#4    green_dude777

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 10:50 PM

View PostBavarian Raven, on 26 June 2013 - 10:41 PM, said:

Or maybe, just maybe it wasn't him. Might have been the gov creating false info... or more then likely someone else with the same name ;)

Also another reason to not be allowing a government to database everything on us for their convenience.

Maybe he did think that 4 years ago, are people not allowed to change their minds?  I was under the impression you're supposed to be getting smarter and gain wisdom as life goes on.  Don't we all celebrate when a racist stops with their prejudice?  Don't we applaud those who admit their mistakes and turn over a new leaf?

Or maybe, he still expects this punishment, but felt that his life is worth giving for our Bill of Rights.

On a tangent here, but is this how the government is going to use this information?  If I'm suspected of a crime, are they going to go back to when I was 17 years old and pick out snippets in a message board to incriminate me for something 13 years later?


#5    spartan max2

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 10:58 PM

People change veiws overtime, at the time he could of honestly felt that way. I find it funny how the media is trying to dig up anything to discredit him.


At the end of the day what he did was tells us the goverment is spying on us, and he proved it.

I dont care about all the random information about his social life.

Edited by spartan max2, 26 June 2013 - 11:01 PM.

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#6    Jessica Christ

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 02:47 AM

View Postgreen_dude777, on 26 June 2013 - 10:50 PM, said:

Maybe he did think that 4 years ago, are people not allowed to change their minds?  I was under the impression you're supposed to be getting smarter and gain wisdom as life goes on.

*snip*

Or maybe, he still expects this punishment, but felt that his life is worth giving for our Bill of Rights.

Growing up usually means abandoning teenage revolutionary ideas.

A whistleblower willing to risk their life remains in the country. Cowardly traitors flee.


#7    Professor Buzzkill

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 02:51 AM

View PostThe world needs you, on 27 June 2013 - 02:47 AM, said:

Growing up usually means abandoning teenage revolutionary ideas.

A whistleblower willing to risk their life remains in the country. Cowardly traitors flee.

Have you seen what happens to "whistleblowers" who stay in the country? I don't think its cowardly, just smart


#8    Yamato

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:07 AM

If he wasn't a buttoned-up organization man he wouldn't have gotten his job at Booz in the first place.  We're all entitled to a change of heart.  Some people are more stubborn at the proposition than others.

It is the federal government's job to stop violations of our Constitutional rights.  When the government is doing the exact opposite, Snowden felt that going to the public with that information was the right thing to do.   And people who know what the Constitution says agree with him.

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#9    acidhead

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:16 AM

View PostYamato, on 27 June 2013 - 03:07 AM, said:

If he wasn't a buttoned-up organization man he wouldn't have gotten his job at Booz in the first place.  We're all entitled to a change of heart.  Some people are more stubborn at the proposition than others.

It is the federal government's job to stop violations of our Constitutional rights.  When the government is doing the exact opposite, Snowden felt that going to the public with that information was the right thing to do.   And people who know what the Constitution says agree with him.

ha... thats like the hunchback of notre dame telling you to stand straight!

"there is no wrong or right - just popular opinion"

#10    Frank Merton

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:20 AM

I think he went after the job with doing something like this in mind.  Indeed, I think he had help, 'cause he wasn't qualified and still slipped in.  No doubt the authorities will look into all aspects of this in detail.


#11    libstaK

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:36 AM

And the award for poster child for "Thou shalt not judge lest thou be judged for in whatsoever manner ye judge ..." yadi yada, goes to Snowden who has made it clear folk like him "should be shot".

Oh dear ....

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#12    Jessica Christ

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:44 AM

View PostProfessor Buzzkill, on 27 June 2013 - 02:51 AM, said:



Have you seen what happens to "whistleblowers" who stay in the country? I don't think its cowardly, just smart

Leaving means you are no longer a whistleblower. Can you name other whistleblowers who did that? No, Snowdem is a drama llama.

Bradley Manning also is not one, he stayed in the shadows. Whistleblowers stand up and speak out not run away and release information selectively.

Snowden is attempting to calculate his damage toward our security. He is helping our competitors. That is not what whistleblowing is. Look up Serpico.

Edited by The world needs you, 27 June 2013 - 03:45 AM.


#13    Frank Merton

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:56 AM

What to do if you genuinely believe the government or your employer is breaking the law (which I seriously doubt was the case here -- here we have an arrogant publicity seeker and an outright traitor)?

There are two obligations in conflict -- the duty of allegiance to one's nation or employer and the duty of obeying the law.

We are often confronted with such conflicts, although usually on much less important matters, and how we come down in such an issue is largely buried in the smaller details of what is going on and how much help or harm the lawbreaking is doing.  I do think, though, that when it is national secrets that are involved, if we can't stand it we should still keep our mouth shut -- and only resign if we don't want the personal involvement.  It is a less-than-perfect world and we almost certainly do not know the whole story and our judgement is almost certainly not perfect.


#14    DieChecker

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 04:28 AM

The difference between Manning and Snowden, IMHO, is that Manning took specific files... hundreds of thousands of them... which he did not have the time to have examined and gave them away to everyone. He had no idea what damages he might be doing and he did not really care what specific information he gave out.

Snowden did something similar, but all his files he knew what was in them. He knew what he was publishing. He also was specifically trying to expose what he saw as a crime by the government in not telling people that their mail was passing through filters. I don't believe he did anything that directly exposed any people to direct danger. And so in all that, I can respect what he did, even if I think it was technically treasonous. But, Manning I have zero respect for.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#15    third_eye

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 06:22 AM

don't need to be anything close to 'national security' to have one's life threatened ...


Quote

Jeffrey S. Wigand (/ˈwɡænd/; born December 17, 1942) is a former vice president of research and development at Brown & Williamson in Louisville, Kentucky, who worked on the development of reduced-harm cigarettes. He lectures around the world as an expert witness and consultant for various tobacco issues, and devotes time to his non-profit organization Smoke-Free Kids Inc, an organization that attempts to help children of all ages make better decisions and healthy choices regarding tobacco use.
Wigand became nationally known as a whistleblower on February 4, 1996 when he appeared on the CBS news program 60 Minutes and stated that Brown & Williamson had intentionally manipulated its tobacco blend to increase the amount of Nicotine in cigarette smoke. Wigand claimed that he was subsequently harassed and received anonymous death threats. Wigand discussed the death threats in an interview.[1]

wiki link


> http://www.mariebren...KnewTooMuch.pdf < Brenner, Marie (May 1996), "The Man Who Knew Too Much"

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