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Last of Scottish dialect's speakers dies

cromarty fisherfolk dialect bobby hogg

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 01:00 PM

The last native speaker of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect has died.

Retired engineer Bobby Hogg, 92, was the last person who was still fluent in the dialect used in parts of the Black Isle, near Inverness.

His younger brother Gordon was also a native speaker. He died in April last year aged 86.

The dialect is believed to have arrived in the area with fishing families that moved north from the Firth of Forth in 15th and 16th centuries.

The families were thought to be the descendants of Norse and Dutch fishermen.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-19802616

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#2    Eldorado

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 01:12 PM

Am imagining St Peter saying, "Thank God for that... I never knew what the Hell those guys were saying".

(only jokin.. I know it's sad)


#3    Child of Bast

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 01:18 PM

*kicks El's shin for that remark*  :P:P:P

I find it a bit sad when dialects die out because no one else wants to learn it. :(

Edited by Lady Kasey, 03 October 2012 - 01:19 PM.

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#4    wolfknight

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 01:51 PM

What a shame that no one wanted to learn it and pass it down.


#5    Abramelin

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 02:04 PM

View PostStill Waters, on 03 October 2012 - 01:00 PM, said:

The last native speaker of the Cromarty fisherfolk dialect has died.

Retired engineer Bobby Hogg, 92, was the last person who was still fluent in the dialect used in parts of the Black Isle, near Inverness.

His younger brother Gordon was also a native speaker. He died in April last year aged 86.

The dialect is believed to have arrived in the area with fishing families that moved north from the Firth of Forth in 15th and 16th centuries.

The families were thought to be the descendants of Norse and Dutch fishermen.


http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-19802616

"Included was the word "tumblers" for dolphins and harbour porpoises and phrases such as "At now kucka" for a friendly greeting."

We here in the Netherlands still use the word "tuimelaars" as a word for dolphins, and it translates into 'tumblers'.


#6    Taun

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 03:04 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 03 October 2012 - 02:04 PM, said:

"Included was the word "tumblers" for dolphins and harbour porpoises and phrases such as "At now kucka" for a friendly greeting."

We here in the Netherlands still use the word "tuimelaars" as a word for dolphins, and it translates into 'tumblers'.

I have no idea what that might literally mean... Is "At now Kucka" a derivative of Dutch?


#7    Coffey

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:26 PM

Weird, sounds like a mix between Peterhead and fraserburgh etc Fishermen and Dutch. lol

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#8    acute

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 12:53 PM

I had about as much success understanding that accent as I did with this 'Newfie Joke' I found on youtube.




#9    Abramelin

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 06:09 AM

View PostTaun, on 03 October 2012 - 03:04 PM, said:

I have no idea what that might literally mean... Is "At now Kucka" a derivative of Dutch?

Maybe that's Norse?


#10    Abramelin

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 07:17 AM

The Cromarty Fisherfolk Dialect
A Lexicon of Words and Phrases compiled by Am Baile,
The Highland Council's History and Culture Website


http://www.ambaile.o...olk Dialect.pdf





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