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Infant Euthanasia in GB


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#1    OverSword

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:19 PM

Samples from the article:

Sick children are being discharged from NHS hospitals to die at home or in hospices on controversial ‘death pathways’.
Until now, end of life regime the Liverpool Care Pathway was thought to have involved only elderly and terminally-ill adults.
But the Mail can reveal the practice of withdrawing food and fluid by tube is being used on young patients as well as severely disabled newborn babies.

One doctor has admitted starving and dehydrating ten babies to death in the neonatal unit of one hospital alone.
Writing in a leading medical journal, the physician revealed the process can take an average of ten days during which a baby becomes ‘smaller and shrunken’.
The LCP – on which 130,000 elderly and terminally-ill adult patients die each year – is now the subject of an independent inquiry ordered by ministers.





http://www.dailymail...-life-plan.html

Edited by OverSword, 29 November 2012 - 08:21 PM.


#2    Biff Wellington

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:24 PM

*insert sarcasm* What a fantastic practice. :unsure:


#3    Star of the Sea

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:25 PM

OMG if this is true, then this is awful. My sister-in-law passed away from brain cancer and they withdrew fluids and food approx 10 days before she died. It was bad enough watching her die slowly aged 46 of cancer and dehydration. Just terrible... poor little children and babes :cry:

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#4    Feebs

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:27 PM

View PostStar of the Sea, on 29 November 2012 - 08:25 PM, said:

OMG if this is true, then this is awful. My sister-in-law passed away from brain cancer and they withdrew fluids and food approx 10 days before she died. It was bad enough watching her die slowly aged 46 of cancer and dehydration. Just terrible... poor little children and babes :cry:
i am with you on this one it was 9 days with my father...surely they can make the passing quicker...we wouldnt let our animals suffer for that amount of time x

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#5    Star of the Sea

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:34 PM

View PostFeebs, on 29 November 2012 - 08:27 PM, said:

i am with you on this one it was 9 days with my father...surely they can make the passing quicker...we wouldn't let our animals suffer for that amount of time x

Hi Feebs,

Welcome by the way! I think they do accelerate the dying process in adults by 'upping' the morphine for terminal patients (which I think is acceptable) when they are close to death. They did this with my Dad and Father-in-law. However, with my sister-in-law they used the withdrawal method of fluids and food. It was terrible... really horrific. Sorry to hear you lost your Dad :(

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#6    OverSword

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:36 PM

Personally I would rather just get a lethal injection than dehydrated and starved to death.

Star and Feebs, my sympathies.

Edited by OverSword, 29 November 2012 - 08:37 PM.


#7    QuiteContrary

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:41 PM

Do they cry?


#8    Feebs

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:43 PM

View PostQuiteContrary, on 29 November 2012 - 08:41 PM, said:

Do they cry?
this is what i would find hearless...with our dogs they just go to sleep snoring after an injection and slowly drift off....why cant we do it more that way...falling asleep maybe dreming your way to the other side xx

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#9    Feebs

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:44 PM

View PostStar of the Sea, on 29 November 2012 - 08:34 PM, said:

Hi Feebs,

Welcome by the way! I think they do accelerate the dying process in adults by 'upping' the morphine for terminal patients (which I think is acceptable) when they are close to death. They did this with my Dad and Father-in-law. However, with my sister-in-law they used the withdrawal method of fluids and food. It was terrible... really horrific. Sorry to hear you lost your Dad :(
omg thats awful...why would they do that ...its so wrong ...this whole world has gone crazy...men on death row get better treatment at the end x

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#10    Star of the Sea

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:52 PM

View PostFeebs, on 29 November 2012 - 08:44 PM, said:

omg that's awful...why would they do that ...its so wrong ...this whole world has gone crazy...men on death row get better treatment at the end x

I know it's just awful. My late twin sis, who was a palliative nurse (specialist nurse for terminal patients) sat with my sis-in-law on her days off and tried to make her more comfortable. My twin sis was enraged by this practise (it was a different hospital and not NHS where she worked). Sad thing is my twin died suddenly a few weeks later after my sis-in-law died and they are buried side by side. :cry:

Edited by Star of the Sea, 29 November 2012 - 08:57 PM.

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#11    Feebs

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:00 PM

View PostStar of the Sea, on 29 November 2012 - 08:52 PM, said:

I know it's just awful. My late twin sis, who was a palliative nurse (specialist nurse for terminal patients) sat with my sis-in-law on her days off and tried to make her more comfortable. My twin sis was enraged by this practise (it was a different hospital and not NHS where she worked). Sad thing is my twin died suddenly a few weeks later after my sis-in-law died and they are buried side by side. :cry:
bless you hun that must be so hard to come to terms with.....where i live in the uk the palliative nurses are amazing and the job they do is fantastic....my father went into a hospice at the end due to it being easier to administer the drugs needed for the last 9 days of his life ...i stayed with him the entire time ...he lived with me up till this point..the hardest thing i remember was when he was still speaking and said he was scared to die....as a nurse myself i have seen this countless times and you do try and harden to it but you just cant...i now have left that profession and wont go back as i cant see people suffer the way they do ...the law needs to be changed as it is heartless the way some are treated here and the prolonging of the pain is disgusting x

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#12    Star of the Sea

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:05 PM

View PostFeebs, on 29 November 2012 - 09:00 PM, said:

bless you hun that must be so hard to come to terms with.....where i live in the uk the palliative nurses are amazing and the job they do is fantastic....my father went into a hospice at the end due to it being easier to administer the drugs needed for the last 9 days of his life ...i stayed with him the entire time ...he lived with me up till this point..the hardest thing i remember was when he was still speaking and said he was scared to die....as a nurse myself i have seen this countless times and you do try and harden to it but you just cant...i now have left that profession and wont go back as i cant see people suffer the way they do ...the law needs to be changed as it is heartless the way some are treated here and the prolonging of the pain is disgusting x

Thanks Feebs. So you were a nurse! I bet you were a great comfort for your Dad and what a lovely thing that you looked after him so well. I'm worried because my daughter is about to qualify as a nurse in a few months and I wonder if this is the right path for her. The NHS has gone down the nick and you hear about all these horror stories.

Edited by Star of the Sea, 29 November 2012 - 09:06 PM.

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#13    glorybebe

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:07 PM

I would much rather die suddenly in an accident or have a fatal heartattack rather than to be made to suffer so horribly for so long.  How that must mess with nurses and doctors knowing what they have to do to their patients because of the law.

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#14    Feebs

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:12 PM

View PostStar of the Sea, on 29 November 2012 - 09:05 PM, said:

Thanks Feebs. So you were a nurse! I bet you were a great comfort for your Dad and what a lovely thing that you looked after him so well. I'm worried because my daughter is about to qualify as a nurse in a few months and I wonder if this is the right path for her. The NHS has gone down the nick and you hear about all these horror stories.
its a tough job and it is hard to deal with but i did it for 20 years .more so with the mentally ill but still also your everyday nursing...and it wasnt till i lost my Dad that it got too much for me but i do private care now for the elderly so im still in that sort of profession...just not as fast paced really and i have time to listen to the people i work with and time to do the little things that count x

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#15    Ashotep

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:14 PM

When I had to call the vet to put my horse down I was crying, been up all night in January out in the field caring for this horse, the vet told me someday you might wish someone could do this for you.





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