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The being found is neither human nor animal


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#1    wlorac

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 04:38 AM

                                                  "Strange Being Found in Southern Chile"
   Written By: Terra.Cl
   Posted: 23 Oct 2002
  http://www.paranormalnews.com/article.asp?...p?articleId=410


A mysterious being was found 15 days ago in the city of Concepcion. The being, which measures only 7.2 cm, has a large skull, two arms, long fingers and two legs.

One of the children of a family from Santiago, vacationing in the area, found the mysterious being in the bushes while on a family walk. After wrapping it up in paper, he took it home.

The witnesses claim that the being was alive for at least 8 days and would open its eyes on occasion. However, the creatureís aspect is similar to that of a mummy and shows signs of having been burned.

Specialists at the University of Chile noted that it could be a fetus of some local feline, but have hitherto been unable to determine what species it belongs to. It is hoped that tests will be performed within the next few hours to establish its origin; a DNA test will be among them.


"The being found is neither a human nor animal foetus"

After analyzing the strange skeleton found by a family in Concepcion, psychiatrist and abduction expert Mario Dussuel informed Terra.cl that it isnít a human or animal foetus. " I held the strange being in my hands. It seems mummified, measures less than 15 centimeters and is very lightweight. My attention was drawn to its slanted eyes, well-defined temporal lobes and overall composition. Its fingers have nothing to do with those of an animal and it has a very slender neck."

Regarding the likelihood that it could be a fetal human or animal, the specialist added: "The being does not have the characteristics of a human foetus and much less those of an animal. Dussuel added that it is necessary to conduct electron microscopy to study its cells and tissues: "It is very important to be able to make this type of study, aside from taking a sample of DNA. It would therefore be possible to determine if the corpseís biological composition is different from that of a human."

Should this be confirmed, the doctor states that "we would be faced with a case that should cause international uproar with unsuspected repercussions. Iím surprised that no organization has initiated investigations in this regard. There is no doubt that we are faced with an extraordinary event."


                                                  


#2    Space Moose

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 07:07 AM

                                                  Hmmm... No follow up on tests that should have been concluded in a matter of hours.  Sounds like a non-event.

I think I'll do some e-mailing to see what is up with this.  
                                                  


#3    Saru

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 08:00 AM

                                                  This one's been discussed previously, you can view the previous discussion + photographs by clicking HERE

rolleyes.gif                                                  


#4    schadeaux

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Posted 22 April 2003 - 11:41 PM

                                                  One of the last posts in the other thread on this topic asked about an examination of the "body."  I found this:

Story

M.I.B.  I just KNOW it...


ph34r.gif                                                  

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#5    Kismit

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 08:57 AM

                                                  M.I.B. maybe sooo Shadeaux  ph34r.gif                                                  


#6    Sidhe

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 04:12 PM

                                                  This is absurd!  Why would anyone want to prevent the examination of a strange looking animal?

You know this reminds me of something.. perhaps some of you know of Michael Cremo's Forbidden Archaeology book.  I know of it, but have never actually read it.  I just ordered the "condensed" version actually..

But what I do know about that book is that NBC ran a show based on it, and immediately afterwards, a scientific establishment (which one I cannot remember now) attempted to rally support for having NBC's license revoked with the .. uh (where's that memory chip when I need it?).. FCC, that's them.

Can you believe that?

Well scientists have done this sort of thing before.  A well known mathematician who had contributed some crucial ideas to physics, Arthur Eddington, proposed a theory in 1938 that smacked of numerology.  The fact that he reasoned purely from mathematics, and not "paranormal quackery" did not matter.  A group of outraged scientists petitioned to have him jettisoned from the Academy of Sciences and his career was ruined.  He is but one of many scientists who have faced the end of their careers for daring to buck the "status quo".

There is no MIB phenomena needed to explain this.  It is entirely understandable from anthropological or psychological grounds.  The scientific community has become almost "tribal" in its protection of the sacred myths from which our ordinary perception of reality is constructed.

It's easy to postulate a reason for why this should be so.. what kind of people are scientists?  Intelligent thinkers, yes.  Curious?  Maybe so, maybe not.  A lot of people, it seems to me, go into science to find the kind of "certainty" religion used to provide; to make sense out of a senseless and chaotic world.  Anything that threatens the stories they are comfortable with threatens them right where they have the most fear.

I can't think of another way to explain the way scientists behave toward theories that buck the trends.

In the US, it has taken thirty years and more to finally break the consensus that had emerged around the idea that the first immigrations to this continent were 12,000 years ago.  Any data that disturbed this "fact" were ignored and their proponents shouted down.  It has taken brave persistence by people who were unafraid of a new reality to finally chip away from the "accepted revelation" that was the Siberian Land Bridge.  Archaeologists are finally having to explain the fact that social systems in South America were far in advance of those in North America, and that evidence of human occupation of South America may go back 40,000 years (same as Austraila).

The Priests of the Inquisition did not vanish, they just changed jobs.

It's kinda my pet peeve..                                                  


#7    Halo_Jones

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 04:12 PM

                                                  Whhhoooo, Thats a bit weird  huh.gif  Definetly sounds like some sort of cover up going on there.  dry.gif                                                  


#8    Kismit

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 08:09 PM

                                                  Actually it dosen't say who pressured them . It could be as simple as there investers not wanting them to spend copius amounts of money on testing.
Just a thought. smile.gif                                                  


#9    Magikman

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Posted 24 April 2003 - 05:08 AM

                                                  
QUOTE (Sidhe @ Apr 23 2003, 05:12 PM)

You know this reminds me of something.. perhaps some of you know of Michael Cremo's Forbidden Archaeology book.  I know of it, but have never actually read it.  I just ordered the "condensed" version actually..

But what I do know about that book is that NBC ran a show based on it, and immediately afterwards, a scientific establishment (which one I cannot remember now) attempted to rally support for having NBC's license revoked with the .. uh (where's that memory chip when I need it?).. FCC, that's them.

Can you believe that?

No, I don't. Speaking of absurdities. The people you are referring too would be intelligent enough to know that they couldn't rightfully petition the FCC to revoke NBC's license, under what grounds? For televising a program based on spurious and ludicrous creationist ideology? Heaven forbid. What they did do was organize a letter writing campaign against the network itself, bemoaning "tabloid-level sensationalism and pseudoscience misrepresented as cutting edge research."   

Yes, we've discussed Cremo's 'Forbidden Archaeology' before, and there isn't much of anything in it based on competent investigative work or research. Cremo is an editor and publicist for the Bhaktivedanta Institute of India, a religious organization dedicated to promoting their 'creationist' agenda, and Thompson is a mathematician by trade, not exactly qualifications for making credible 'earth shaking' findings in paleoanthropology and archaeology, don't you think? So while you may believe mainstream scientists are concerned with maintaining the status quo, you might want to investigate what truly 'motivates' the misunderstood 'mavericks' who are being unfairly treated. You may not like what you find. Here's a couple links to help you on the way;

http://www.skeptic.com/archives32.html

http://www.ramtops.demon.co.uk/tarzia.html

http://members.aol.com/Paluxy2/nbc.htm

I also believe you unfairly summerize and/or criticize scientists in general. It is stated in one of the articles I have linked above that "Serious treatment of new ideas, however much on the fringe they may be, is an appropriate venture in science."  As in any profession, there is great regard for adherence to methodology and procedures based on competent scientific knowledge and thoroughness. Of course there is resistance to the ranting of those perceived to be unqualified, would you want your pool boy operating on your daughter just because he claims to be an expert surgeon who's just recently developed an interest in the field?

Magikman

* - I agree with Kismit, why can't it just be a matter of someone realizing they've been duped and there isn't anything to the story? Stories of massive coverups are so pathetically lame anymore. tongue.gif                                                  

Edited by Magikman, 24 April 2003 - 05:32 AM.

Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep insights can be winnowed from deep nonsense. ~ Carl Sagan

"...man has an irrepressible tendency to read meaning into the buzzing confusion of sights and sounds impinging on his senses; and where no agreed meaning can be found, he will provide it out of his own imagination." ~ Arthur Koestler

#10    Magikman

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 03:58 AM

                                                    I know you've seen this already, Wlorac, but for those who still believe there is still a 'mystery' surrounding this creature there is this;

Source: Terra.CL
Date: October 25, 2002

Veterinarian Arturo Mann:

It's Final: "Strange Creature Was A Marsupial"

This is what a monito de monte (mountain monkey) looks like.

A specialist from the University of Santo Tom=E1s stated that it is a monito de monte, a small mammal that lives in the Valdivian rainforest and hides during the day.

SANTIAGO, October 25: The mysterious creature which caused expectation throughout Chile and which was even reputed to be extraterrestrial in origin turned out to be a mammal known as Monito de Monte (literally, mountain monkey). This was the statement made by veterinarian and professor of the Univ. of Santo Tomas, Arturo Mann, who subjected the specimen to analysis. The specialist, who was one of the few scientists who
had access to the specimen found by a family in Concepcion, stated that--based on his knowledge and publications--he can assure with a 90% certainty that the species is terrestrial in origin.

"After a preliminary analysis and without seeing it in "macro" fashion, I have concluded that it is earthly. In other words, a little animal, a mammal that presents hair, nails, fingers. It is earthly and even terrestrial, which is to say, it's not a flying animal. It shows appendages suited to walking and even for digging, with long nails. The body shows some damage, possibly from animal predation or poor care [in the handling] of this little animal.

Terra.Cl: What is it, then?

"It is a small mammal, known as a micromammal, specifically a marsupial and given the region it was found, would correspond with a high degree of certainty to a "monito del monte". To reach the conclusion that it is this "monito" or a marsupial, we are mainly based in the fact that the anterior members present five fingers with an opposable thumb. This means that the animal can grip branches using its hand. That's why it's called
"monito" (little monkey).

Terra.Cl: It is commonly found in the southern area of the country?

Not very commonly. It's a hard animal to find. Possibly these people came across a moribund animal.

Terra.Cl: In this case, can we speak of a foetus or a newborn?

"It's a newborn, possibly weakened. Bear in mind that
marsupials in Chile hibernate during the winter. By not having any food, they go to sleep in April or May, and in late August and September, they emerge in a lethargic, weakened state to find food. This makes them more vulnerable to attacks by other animals or to die from climactic conditions."


Magikman   cool.gif                                                  

Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep insights can be winnowed from deep nonsense. ~ Carl Sagan

"...man has an irrepressible tendency to read meaning into the buzzing confusion of sights and sounds impinging on his senses; and where no agreed meaning can be found, he will provide it out of his own imagination." ~ Arthur Koestler




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