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Is Richard III buried under council car park?

king richard iii car park leicester

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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 12:11 PM

The body of King Richard III may finally be found after archaeologists identified what they believe is his resting place underneath a council car park in Leicester.

Historical records show that Richard III was buried in the church of a Franciscan friary in Leicester shortly after his defeat and death at the hands of Henry Tudor's army in the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

But the destruction of the friary as Britain's monasteries were dissolved under Henry VIII and subsequent removal of its stone ruins meant that over the ensuing centuries the king's exact burial site was forgotten.

Now the mystery of where his body lies could finally be solved after an examination of historical maps by archaeologists located the most likely site for the church, in the car park of a social services office in the centre of Leicester.

http://www.telegraph...l-car-park.html

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#2    tyrant lizard

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 12:26 PM

I thought this was Cockney rhyming slang. Eww


#3    ealdwita

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 03:15 PM

Having been a member of the Richard III Society for a good few years, I've often encountered stories like this.

Several chroniclers maintain that Richard's body was disinterred from it's grave site at Greyfriar's Abbey near Leicester very soon after the battle and the bones thrown into the River Soar. This may have been done on the orders of Henry Tudor himself who was acutely conscious of his tenuous hold on the Crown, and feared that if Richard's resting place became public knowledge it would serve as a shrine for the many people who remained loyal to the House of York. The last thing the Tudor wanted was a Yorkist martyr!

(Sources ......Historia Anglica - Polydor Vergil........... The Usurpation of Richard the Third - Dominic Mancini... and others.)

........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

As a matter of probably little or no interest at all, for about 5 years now I have been researching into the story of a wall tomb in a ruined church near where I live which was reckoned to be the final resting place of one 'Richard Plantagenet', supposedly an illegitimate son of Richard III, and it's turning out to be quite a strange tale. (But that's another story)

Edited by ealdwita, 24 August 2012 - 03:16 PM.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#4    Taun

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:03 PM

View Postealdwita, on 24 August 2012 - 03:15 PM, said:


[snip]
As a matter of probably little or no interest at all, for about 5 years now I have been researching into the story of a wall tomb in a ruined church near where I live which was reckoned to be the final resting place of one 'Richard Plantagenet', supposedly an illegitimate son of Richard III, and it's turning out to be quite a strange tale. (But that's another story)

Do tell!


#5    ealdwita

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:22 PM

View PostTaun, on 24 August 2012 - 05:03 PM, said:

Do tell!

As soon as I get some time to precis it Taun, I'll post it on here.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#6    Taun

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:46 PM

Interestingly enough... Yesterday was the 527th anniversary of The Battle Of Bosworth Field - where Richard died...


#7    ealdwita

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 06:58 PM

View PostTaun, on 24 August 2012 - 05:46 PM, said:

Interestingly enough... Yesterday was the 527th anniversary of The Battle Of Bosworth Field - where Richard died...

Um...er....Not strictly true, I'm afraid, sorry.

(Ealdwita Snippet alert)

A 1485 municipal memorandum from York places the battle "on the fields of Redemore". (The name being derived from the Anglo-Saxon Hreod mor meaning 'reedy marshland'.

The historian Ralph Holinshead wrote in his 1577 Chronicle "King Richard pitched his field on a hill called Anne Beame, refreshed his soldiers and took his rest." This was compounded by William Hutton in his 1788 document The Battle of Bosworth-Field, and placed the battle-site north of the River Sence, whence it passed into accepted wisdom.
It's now believed that Hutton mistook "field" to mean "field of battle", thus creating the idea that the fight took place on Anne Beame (Ambion) Hill, which is indeed, near Market Bosworth. In reality, 'took field' meant 'to make camp'.

I won't go into it all, but there's much evidence that points to the battle being fought on the flat ground north of the village of Dadlington, some 3 miles from the historically supposed site.

(Source - my records) - Plenty more where that came from, sorry!

Edited by ealdwita, 24 August 2012 - 07:26 PM.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#8    Taun

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 07:23 PM

True... and the Battle of Bunker Hill was actually fought on Breeds Hill...


I actually didn't know that there was uncertainty in the location of the battle until I read up on it a bit today... I'd always heard it called "Bosworth Field"...


Interestingly, both sides in the American Civil War, named battles by different criteria...

The Union tended to name battles after the nearest settlement (Gettysburg, Shiloh -named after a church in the area-, etc)  While the Confederates tended to name battles after geographic points (Bull Run - a river/creek, Antietam - also a creek, etc)

General covention was that the winner got to name the battle for historical purposes...

Edited by Taun, 24 August 2012 - 07:29 PM.


#9    CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 10:38 PM

I remeber the battle of thorn hill it was a cold winters day when at 9 00 am the first assault & barage hit us we thought and held that bloody hill for 3 days befor reinforcements came it was a living hell. :gun:

Edited by CRIPTIC CHAMELEON, 24 August 2012 - 10:39 PM.


#10    ealdwita

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 10:55 PM

View PostTaun, on 24 August 2012 - 07:23 PM, said:

True... and the Battle of Bunker Hill was actually fought on Breeds Hill...


I actually didn't know that there was uncertainty in the location of the battle until I read up on it a bit today... I'd always heard it called "Bosworth Field"...


Interestingly, both sides in the American Civil War, named battles by different criteria...

The Union tended to name battles after the nearest settlement (Gettysburg, Shiloh -named after a church in the area-, etc)  While the Confederates tended to name battles after geographic points (Bull Run - a river/creek, Antietam - also a creek, etc)

General covention was that the winner got to name the battle for historical purposes...

And the Battle of Hastings was fought more than 6 miles from Hastings, at Senlac Hill.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#11    ealdwita

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:08 PM

View PostCRIPTIC CHAMELEON, on 24 August 2012 - 10:38 PM, said:

I remeber the battle of thorn hill it was a cold winters day when at 9 00 am the first assault & barage hit us we thought and held that bloody hill for 3 days befor reinforcements came it was a living hell. :gun:

Shouldn't have been that cold. The only Battle of Thorn Hill (USA) I'm aware of took place in June! Or are we talking about the English Civil War skirmish at Thornhill, Yorkshire?

'Bonys emong Stony, lyes here ful styl,
Quilst the Sawle wanders wher God wyl,
Anno Dni. MCCCCCXXIX'

....or am I missing something here? Ooooooh I hate it when that happens!!!!

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Edited by ealdwita, 24 August 2012 - 11:11 PM.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#12    CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:13 PM

View Postealdwita, on 24 August 2012 - 11:08 PM, said:

Shouldn't have been that cold. The only Battle of Thorn Hill (USA) I'm aware of took place in June! Or are we talking about the English Civil War skirmish at Thornhill, Yorkshire?

'Bonys emong Stony, lyes here ful styl,
Quilst the Sawle wanders wher God wyl,
Anno Dni. MCCCCCXXIX'
No mate we called it thorn hill as it was covered in blackberries and we were on a school camp & another school tried to take our camp spot so for 3 days we held them of with snow balls till the rest of the school came.


#13    Taun

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:17 PM

View PostCRIPTIC CHAMELEON, on 24 August 2012 - 11:13 PM, said:

No mate we called it thorn hill as it was covered in blackberries and we were on a school camp & another school tried to take our camp spot so for 3 days we held them of with snow balls till the rest of the school came.

Glad you made it ...  :tu:


#14    ealdwita

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:26 PM

View PostCRIPTIC CHAMELEON, on 24 August 2012 - 11:13 PM, said:

No mate we called it thorn hill as it was covered in blackberries and we were on a school camp & another school tried to take our camp spot so for 3 days we held them of with snow balls till the rest of the school came.

Oooh, I'm gonna give you such a slap!  Posted Image

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#15    Harlequin Dreamer

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:37 PM

View PostCRIPTIC CHAMELEON, on 24 August 2012 - 11:13 PM, said:

No mate we called it thorn hill as it was covered in blackberries and we were on a school camp & another school tried to take our camp spot so for 3 days we held them of with snow balls till the rest of the school came.
Now thats funny you had me for a second Mr Cripy. :yes:





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