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Buddha


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#1    GreenmansGod

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:44 PM

As part of my Druidry I need to learn more about the Buddha.  What is a good introduction read or site?

"The moment you declare a set of ideas to be immune from criticism, satire, derision, or contempt, freedom of thought becomes impossible." Salman Rushdie

#2    The Id3al Experience

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:58 PM

There is so many variations just like any for buddhism, I follow a more philiophical sence of buddhism called Zen. A chineses/Japanese Philophy build of the foundations of buddhism.

A few Sorces that were helpful for me:

http://www.buddhanet...g/intro_bud.htm


But this is a Nice PDF that sums it up and gives a good understanding on Mantras and things of the sort too

www.thebigview.com/download/buddhism.pdf


About the Buddha himself, well this is a good quick read

http://www.biography.../buddha-9230587

Hope that helps anyways.



Edited by The Id3al Experience, 25 June 2013 - 12:00 AM.

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#3    Ryu

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:11 AM

So..what is with the chubby guy that people call "Buddha"?
I read that he was just one aspect of the Buddha or something.
There are different statues of the chubby guy; one is dancing, another holding what looks to be a bowl over his head and so forth.

Is this jolly guy a misrepresentation or a mistaken identity?


#4    The Id3al Experience

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:21 AM

You are most likely refereing to Budai. This is a common confusion.

Normally referred to as the laughing buddha, or the Good luck buddha.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budai

Edited by The Id3al Experience, 25 June 2013 - 12:22 AM.

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#5    Insanity

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:25 AM

I would suggest 'What the Buddha Taught' by Dr Walpola Rahula.

"We see things only as we are constructed to see them, and can gain no idea of their absolute nature. With five feeble senses we pretend to comprehend the boundlessly complex cosmos, yet other beings with wider, stronger, or different range of senses might not only see very differently the things we see, but might see and study whole worlds of matter, energy, and life which lie close at hand yet can never be detected with the senses we have." - H.P. Lovecraft, "From Beyond" Published 1934

#6    StarMountainKid

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:32 AM

I'm no expert on the subject, this is just my opinions.

I suppose there are many introductions to the Buddha. I think all will agree with each other in general, but there are many different interpretations of Buddha and of Buddhism, as there are many interpretations of Christianity and of Jesus. So, whatever you read will have its own slant on what the Buddha taught and what  Buddhism is.

In my view, the original teachings of the Buddha were psychological in nature. Later, Buddhism became a religion in many parts of the world. The Buddha disliked all religions, and when questioned would remain silent on the subject.

I would say Zen is the simplest and the closest to original Buddhism. Then again, Zen has a lot of Taoist influence in it.

Since the first written teaching of the Buddha were produced about four hundred and fifty years after the Buddha's death, I don't think we can know exactly what the original Buddha's teachings were, except perhaps for the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path and the Five Precepts..

Edited by StarMountainKid, 25 June 2013 - 12:34 AM.

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#7    redhen

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:34 AM

Not sure what the connection to Buddhism is for a Druid, but here's a decent  documentary on the life of the Buddha.





There are so many branches and schools, it would be hard to recommend where to start. But Zen Buddhism seems to be popular in the West as there is not so much cultural baggage.


#8    DeWitz

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:37 AM

The best book about "generic" Buddhism is entitled, If You See the Buddha on the Road, Kill  Him . It came out in the '80's, but I cannot recall the author. As a religious professional I have studied several forms of Buddhism over the years. All I have learned is that: 1) Buddhism is not a religion; 2) the essence of Buddhism is detachment from this carnal world, full of suffering which is, after all, an 'illusion;' 3) most Buddhists are pacifists, although in Myanmar (formerly Burma) there is a militant movement of Buddhists in which devotees have attacked and burned Muslims and their mosques; 4) every spiritual movement is full of contradictions and blind spots.

Edited by szentgyorgy, 25 June 2013 - 12:39 AM.

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#9    GreenmansGod

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:45 AM

You can be a Druid and follow any path, learning from other paths is apart of it. I don't single out one guru to follow I explore all of them.  There are some Buddhist who come to our circles I think a discussion would be worth while.

"The moment you declare a set of ideas to be immune from criticism, satire, derision, or contempt, freedom of thought becomes impossible." Salman Rushdie

#10    StarMountainKid

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:46 AM

I would just add that there is religious Buddhism, philosophical Buddhism, and ethical Buddhism. I would also add a transcendent Buddhism, a state of consciousness in which the many manifestations of experience all become one, a unity wherein the self dissolves or merges into the One, where there is no separation between the objective and subjective.

A question asked of the Zen Master Huang Po (?-849)

Q:  What Dharma do all the Buddhas teach when they manifest themselves in the world?

A:  When all the Buddhas manifest themselves in the world, they proclaim nothing but the One Mind.  Thus Gautama Buddha silently transmitted the doctrine that the One Mind, which is the substance of all things and fills the entire world of phenomena.  Discuss it as you may, how can you even hope to approach the truth through words?  Nor can it be perceived either subjectively or objectively.  So, full understanding can come to you only through an inexpressible mystery.  The approach to it is called the Gateway of the Stillness beyond all Activity.  If you wish to understand, know that a sudden comprehension comes when the mind has been purged of all the clutter of conceptual and discriminatory thought-activity.  Those who seek the truth by means of intellect and learning only get further and further away from it.  
Not till your thoughts cease all their branching here and there, not till you abandon all thoughts of seeking for something, not till your mind is motionless as wood or stone, will you be on the right road to the Gate.


Edited by StarMountainKid, 25 June 2013 - 12:46 AM.

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#11    redhen

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:48 AM

View PostStarMountainKid, on 25 June 2013 - 12:32 AM, said:

I would say Zen is the simplest and the closest to original Buddhism. Then again, Zen has a lot of Taoist influence in it.

Indeed. Not surprising since Zen evolved out of Chan which was a Chinese term for the Sanskrit dhyana(meditation). So if you're lazy, just head over to Youtube and watch all the old David Carradine Kung Fu tv series, Grasshopper.

nb. textual criticism is not just for Christianity, the same method is applied to Buddhism with similar results. It seems now that there were different interpretations and teachings right from the start.


#12    GreenmansGod

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:55 AM

View Postredhen, on 25 June 2013 - 12:48 AM, said:

nb. textual criticism is not just for Christianity, the same method is applied to Buddhism with similar results. It seems now that there were different interpretations and teachings right from the start.

Which is why Druids don't follow a single guru or sacred text.

Edited by Darkwind, 25 June 2013 - 12:55 AM.

"The moment you declare a set of ideas to be immune from criticism, satire, derision, or contempt, freedom of thought becomes impossible." Salman Rushdie

#13    The Id3al Experience

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 12:59 AM

View PostDarkwind, on 25 June 2013 - 12:55 AM, said:

Which is why Druids don't follow a single guru or sacred text.

neither should a true buddhist. He should follow himself.

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#14    redhen

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:07 AM

View PostDarkwind, on 25 June 2013 - 12:55 AM, said:

Which is why Druids don't follow a single guru or sacred text.

Then you also have something in common with Jainism.

"Anekāntavāda (Devanagari: अनेकान्तवाद) is one of the most important and fundamental doctrines of Jainism. It refers to the principles of pluralism and multiplicity of viewpoints, the notion that truth and reality are perceived differently from diverse points of view, and that no single point of view is the complete truth"

Yes, I lifted my avatar from the Jain symbol, minus the Swastika because, well you know.

What's always amazed me is the time period when all these religions and philosophies developed, Buddhism, Jainism, Greek philosophy, Taoism and Confucianism, the Old Testament, all were developed during the Axial Age. It must have been a very special time.


#15    Ryu

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:15 AM

View PostThe Id3al Experience, on 25 June 2013 - 12:21 AM, said:

You are most likely refereing to Budai. This is a common confusion.

Normally referred to as the laughing buddha, or the Good luck buddha.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budai

Thanks a heap for the link. It makes more sense but it seems odd that even among Buddhists there seems to be differing opinions.

As a sidenote I, or rather my father, had a big Buddha statue who had a happy dragon draped over his shoulders.
Thinking back I wish he hadn't given it away.
But at any rate thanks.

There are many people who think Buddhism is a religion when it is just a philosophy..Buddha, as I recall, was merely giving his views and was not demanding that others follow him or be sent to eternal torment (like some religions claim).

But like with all philosophies there are things in Buddhism I do not go along with..especially the whole "Life is suffering" bit..focusing on it so much that balance is being sacrificed right there. To me life is just life...not good, not bad...things happen that hurt us and things happen that help us and some things just leave you going "Huh?".





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