Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

America Unearthed


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#16    Vincennes

Vincennes

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,301 posts
  • Joined:12 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:32 PM

I thought it was most interesting when this first came out that all of the archeologists yip yapped in unison  -  Not true, we never found the simalarity of language before.  Well guys did you ever think that the language similarities were found by a professor who just happened to be a Native American Crow and who just happened to be translating Mayan text.  I wonder if it ever dawned on them those two abilities in an archeolgy professor didn't happen every day?  

Their second yap was Mayans couldn't have made it to Georgia.  I believe Thor Heyerdahl proved the Egyptians could have made it to the Americas in their reed boats - and they dont'think the Mayans could have made to Georgia?

I have a good friend who is active in her Native American culture and when I sent her the first article, her response was, "Well we have always known that, anyone can see the similarities in the snake monuments, etc.  It just seems no one ever thought to ask the Native Americans what they see.  Typical.

Edited by Duncansmom, 27 December 2012 - 03:34 PM.


#17    lightly

lightly

    metaphysical therapist

  • Member
  • 5,993 posts
  • Joined:01 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan U.S.A.

  • "The future ain't what it used to be"
    Yogi Berra

Posted 27 December 2012 - 08:47 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 27 December 2012 - 12:59 PM, said:

These Chontal Maya have an interesting name:

The Chontal Maya are an indigenous people of the Mexican state of Tabasco. "Chontal", from the Nahuatl word for chontalli, which means "foreigner", has been applied to various ethnic groups in Mexico. The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco", but writers about them refer to them as the Chontal of Centla, the Tabasco Chontal, or in Spanish, Chontales. They consider themselves the descendants of the Olmecs, and are not related to the Oaxacan Chontal.

http://en.wikipedia....tal_Maya_people


"The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco", but writers about them refer to them as the Chontal of Centla."

Does that resemble any name of a tribe in Florida or Georgia that you know of, Lightly?

   Not that i know of Abramelin. i found this list of Florida tribes that names these :
Native American Tribes in Florida Bibliography


Ais Apalachee Calusa Creek Miccosukee Seminole Timucua Yemassee


http://dlis.dos.stat...rican_bib.cfm  


But i think it's interesting that  "The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco" Yokot'an / Yucatan ??? (as in the peninsula  on the Gulf of Mexico sticking out into the carribean and part of Olmec territory) is the similarity of the words just a meaningless coincidence??  I dunno, it just caught my eye.

Edited by lightly, 27 December 2012 - 08:55 PM.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#18    Big Bad Voodoo

Big Bad Voodoo

    High priest of Darwinism

  • Member
  • 9,582 posts
  • Joined:15 Nov 2010
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:32 PM

If Inca could burried tresure in Oak Island well why not? :santa:

JFK: "And we are as a people, inherently and historically, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.
For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#19    Vincennes

Vincennes

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,301 posts
  • Joined:12 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

Posted 28 December 2012 - 12:11 AM

View Postlightly, on 27 December 2012 - 08:47 PM, said:



   Not that i know of Abramelin.     i found this list of Florida tribes that names these :
    Native American Tribes in Florida Bibliography

    
                                                            Ais                                    Apalachee                                    Calusa                                                            Creek                                    Miccosukee                                    Seminole                                                            Timucua                                    Yemassee                        


http://dlis.dos.stat...rican_bib.cfm  


But i think it's interesting that  "The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco"    Yokot'an / Yucatan ??? (as in the peninsula  on the Gulf of Mexico sticking out into the carribean and part of Olmec territory)     is the similarity of the words just a meaningless coincidence??  I dunno, it just caught my eye.
Put your hands over your ears and eyes and behave  -  Listen to the modern archeologists who have already discovered all there is to know! Please don't bother them with any new facts !

Edited by Duncansmom, 28 December 2012 - 12:12 AM.


#20    lightly

lightly

    metaphysical therapist

  • Member
  • 5,993 posts
  • Joined:01 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan U.S.A.

  • "The future ain't what it used to be"
    Yogi Berra

Posted 28 December 2012 - 12:46 AM

View PostDuncansmom, on 28 December 2012 - 12:11 AM, said:

Put your hands over your ears and eyes and behave  -  Listen to the modern archeologists who have already discovered all there is to know! Please don't bother them with any new facts !

haha,  i'm not misbehaving,  much .. or claiming facts. I just like things that tickle my curiosity.

Edited by lightly, 28 December 2012 - 12:47 AM.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#21    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,109 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 28 December 2012 - 09:27 AM

View Postlightly, on 27 December 2012 - 08:47 PM, said:

   Not that i know of Abramelin. i found this list of Florida tribes that names these :
Native American Tribes in Florida Bibliography


Ais Apalachee Calusa Creek Miccosukee Seminole Timucua Yemassee


http://dlis.dos.stat...rican_bib.cfm  


But i think it's interesting that  "The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco" Yokot'an / Yucatan ??? (as in the peninsula  on the Gulf of Mexico sticking out into the carribean and part of Olmec territory) is the similarity of the words just a meaningless coincidence??  I dunno, it just caught my eye.

Yes, their name is the origin of the name Yucatan. The Chontal Maya lived there.


#22    notoverrated

notoverrated

    O.O

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,244 posts
  • Joined:18 Jul 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kansas

  • courage > scooby

Posted 28 December 2012 - 10:49 AM

that seems cool.

If your not after beauty, then why are you even drawing breath?

#23    lightly

lightly

    metaphysical therapist

  • Member
  • 5,993 posts
  • Joined:01 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan U.S.A.

  • "The future ain't what it used to be"
    Yogi Berra

Posted 28 December 2012 - 12:01 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 28 December 2012 - 09:27 AM, said:

Yes, their name is the origin of the name Yucatan. The Chontal Maya lived there.

  ah thanks,   and they say they are descended from the Olmec.. so it all fits.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#24    burny2009

burny2009

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Joined:29 Dec 2012

Posted 29 December 2012 - 08:57 AM

I just watched.the.2 episodes.....I lik.e what Ive seen so far. Its funny though I tried to go to the hosts wiki page and it was deleted yesterday


#25    LostWorlds

LostWorlds

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Joined:29 Dec 2012

Posted 29 December 2012 - 05:01 PM

View PostLady Kasey, on 26 December 2012 - 01:59 PM, said:

Have any of you in the US seen this show airing on the History Channel? I caught wind of it over the weekend and it seems to be about a one man crusade to change the way history is recorded about the United States. I'm sure this sort of thing is done elsewhere. I think the subject of the episode I briefly watched was about a Mayan presence in Northern Georgia.

Anyway, I was just wondering what the general opinion of this show is. Thanks! :tu:

I was one of the researchers that appeared in this episode. (I was the one talking about the forsyth petroglyph, eagle dancer, spiral mound, and ocmulgee earth lodge.)

A lot of information didn't make it into the show due to time constraints. If you'd like to see my research on the Forsyth Petroglyph as well as the Mayan connection to the Forsyth Petroglyph, read my research here:

http://lostworlds.or...yth_petroglyph/

http://lostworlds.or...yth-petroglyph/

Read my research on the archaeoastronomy of the Ocmulgee Earth Lodge:

http://lostworlds.or...e-earth-lodge/

You can learn more about the Ocmulgee Mounds site and other ancient Native American civilizations of Georgia here:

http://lostworlds.or...ons-of-georgia/

And you can read more of my research on the Mayan connection to Georgia and the rest of America  here:

http://www.MayaInAmerica.com

http://lostworlds.or...aya-in-america/

I'll try to go through this thread and answer any questions that I can.

Edited by LostWorlds, 29 December 2012 - 05:31 PM.


#26    LostWorlds

LostWorlds

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Joined:29 Dec 2012

Posted 29 December 2012 - 05:15 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 27 December 2012 - 12:59 PM, said:


"The Chontal refer to themselves as the Yokot'anob or the Yokot'an, meaning "the speakers of Yoko ochoco", but writers about them refer to them as the Chontal of Centla."

Does that resemble any name of a tribe in Florida or Georgia that you know of, Lightly?

Yes. Let me explain a bit. There were a couple of groups of Chontal Maya. The Yokot'an are the group where the Yucatan gets its name from. Another group of Chontal were called the Poton. (Sometimes spelled Putun.) The name of the province in Mexico where they lived was called Acala.

When the first Spanish entered Florida they found three groups of people living around Lake Okeechobee: Mayaimi, Mayaka, and Mayayuaka. Just north of Lake Okeechobee they entered a province named Ocala and found two groups living there. One named Potani and the other named Uqueten.

Thus there were people called Maya living around Lake Okeechobee. And there was a province called Ocala with tribes named Potani and Uqueten living in Florida just as there was a province called Acala with tribes named Poton and Yokot'an living in it in Mexico.

You can read more of my research on this matter here:

http://lostworlds.or...g-gold-georgia/

To read more of my research on this topic visit:

http://www.MayaInAmerica.com

http://lostworlds.or...aya-in-america/


#27    LostWorlds

LostWorlds

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Joined:29 Dec 2012

Posted 29 December 2012 - 05:27 PM

View PostDuncansmom, on 27 December 2012 - 03:32 PM, said:

I thought it was most interesting when this first came out that all of the archeologists yip yapped in unison  -  Not true, we never found the simalarity of language before.  Well guys did you ever think that the language similarities were found by a professor who just happened to be a Native American Crow and who just happened to be translating Mayan text.  I wonder if it ever dawned on them those two abilities in an archeolgy professor didn't happen every day?  

Their second yap was Mayans couldn't have made it to Georgia.  I believe Thor Heyerdahl proved the Egyptians could have made it to the Americas in their reed boats - and they dont'think the Mayans could have made to Georgia?

I have a good friend who is active in her Native American culture and when I sent her the first article, her response was, "Well we have always known that, anyone can see the similarities in the snake monuments, etc.  It just seems no one ever thought to ask the Native Americans what they see.  Typical.

The migration legends of many southeastern tribes claim they came from someplace else. The Kasihta Creek migration legend includes references to earthquakes and volcanoes. The Hitchiti Creek migration says they arrived on the shore of Florida from a "place of reeds." Place of Reeds is a known Mayan euphemism for a large city. The Cherokee claim that foreign priests who spoke an unknown language resided atop the mounds and the Cherokee warriors eventually massacred them and their families because of all the abuses they suffered from these foreigners.

But white anthropologists think they know more than the very people they are studying and so dismiss these oral histories as fanciful myths with no basis in reality.

You can learn more about my research on these migration legends at my website:

http://lostworlds.or...g-gold-georgia/

http://lostworlds.or...ns-west-mexico/


#28    Swede

Swede

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,404 posts
  • Joined:30 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 30 December 2012 - 12:46 AM

View PostLostWorlds, on 29 December 2012 - 05:01 PM, said:


Have not had the time to fully evaluate your complete presentation. Nor can Meso-American influences on latter/late Woodland/ Mississippian cultures be ruled out as per latter period southwestern research.

Would, however, wish to bring to your attention a matter related to the above segment. Current research would tend to favor a volcanic causation for the "536 AD" event:

http://www.uibk.ac.a...n-et-al-grl.pdf

The above (2008) does not include the more recent research by Dull, et. al. (2010), which provides additional support in regards to the volcanic causation.

The interpretation of petroglyphs, particularly those of uncertain provenience/age/cultural affiliation, has a tendency to be, at its best, quite speculative.

.


#29    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,109 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 30 December 2012 - 11:23 AM

View PostLostWorlds, on 29 December 2012 - 05:15 PM, said:

Yes. Let me explain a bit. There were a couple of groups of Chontal Maya. The Yokot'an are the group where the Yucatan gets its name from. Another group of Chontal were called the Poton. (Sometimes spelled Putun.) The name of the province in Mexico where they lived was called Acala.

When the first Spanish entered Florida they found three groups of people living around Lake Okeechobee: Mayaimi, Mayaka, and Mayayuaka. Just north of Lake Okeechobee they entered a province named Ocala and found two groups living there. One named Potani and the other named Uqueten.

Thus there were people called Maya living around Lake Okeechobee. And there was a province called Ocala with tribes named Potani and Uqueten living in Florida just as there was a province called Acala with tribes named Poton and Yokot'an living in it in Mexico.

You can read more of my research on this matter here:

http://lostworlds.or...g-gold-georgia/

To read more of my research on this topic visit:

http://www.MayaInAmerica.com

http://lostworlds.or...aya-in-america/

Man, that was great ! Thanks.

+++

EDIT:

And I see that you think what I have also thought: that Cahokia might have been a Mayan city:

http://lostworlds.org/tag/cahokia/

.

Edited by Abramelin, 30 December 2012 - 11:29 AM.


#30    Lost Knowledge

Lost Knowledge

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Joined:30 Dec 2012

Posted 30 December 2012 - 11:42 PM

View Postlightly, on 26 December 2012 - 11:19 PM, said:

very interesting Abramelin, i like this bit from your linked PDF :   "This discussion of prehistoric Indian mounds has been centered on the Florida Indians, with emphasis on the Calusa, as geographically the nearest and most probable point of contact. However, it should be noted that similar prehistoric mound building was practiced by Indians who peopled the Mississippi drainage plain (consequently known as the Mississippian culture) as far north as Illinois and Ohio (Swanton 1946). The current consensus is that the Mississippian mound building preceded that of the mound builders in Florida, but this study suggests that the first mounds, influenced by the Maya, were built by the Calusa and the mound building culture moved north at a later date. As noted earlier this agrees with Sears s (1982) findings that the cultivation of maize first appeared in the Calusa area then moved north to the Mississippi plain. "

... here are examples of Mississipian  platform mound  Attachment miss. platform.jpg  and early Mayan platform mound Attachment early mayan.JPG

Pretty similar huh?

might as well add link:
http://www.examiner....ya-architecture

The problem I have with this is that mounds in the US easily predate the existence of the Mayans. For example, Poverty Point in Louisiana contains at least six earthen mounds that date between 1650 BC and 700 BC, long before the Mayans ever came around.

Watson Brake, another archaeological site in Louisiana, is even older. It is considered the earliest mound complex in North America, dating back to 3500 BC.

If there is a connection between the Mississippian mound builders and the Mayans, I think it is more likely that there was sustained trade and cultural contact between the two groups, but one didn't birth the other. The transfer of ideas, beliefs, art, and tools through trade could explain the apparent similarities between the two cultures. They are after all, not very far apart.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Poverty_point
http://en.wikipedia....ki/Watson_Brake

I know those links are from Wikipedia, but Wiki is great for basic info gathering.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users