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Britain has deserted me.

drug smuggler bali lindsay sandiford

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33 replies to this topic

#16    Jessica Christ

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:40 AM

Agree with you 100%

Never said force our view on them. I said pressure, maybe it requires more clarification.

I believe a culture can only change from within when ready, but we can pressure but not in a forceful way, but we can have protestors of the DP protest, we can align with protestors of the DP there, help fund them, post about it, just brainstorming, but I never meant pressure as force.


#17    freetoroam

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:47 AM

Britain has deserted us by NOT having the same laws here! The sespits are back on the streets before you can say "smuggling drugs into the UK is illegal".

Edited by freetoroam, 24 April 2013 - 10:50 AM.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#18    Ohelemapit

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:54 AM

View PostLeave Britney alone!, on 24 April 2013 - 10:40 AM, said:

Agree with you 100%

Never said force our view on them. I said pressure, maybe it requires more clarification.

I believe a culture can only change from within when ready, but we can pressure but not in a forceful way, but we can have protestors of the DP protest, we can align with protestors of the DP there, help fund them, post about it, just brainstorming, but I never meant pressure as force.

The real issue here is that. Each and everyone knows the consequences when doing something illegal in another country. When you enter someone else’s house there are rules and regulations to abide to.

Regardless to anyone’s personal belief in a death penalty.. that is not the issue.

She took a risk and got caught, had she not got caught and earned a nice payday from her actions, I bet she would be living off the rewards of them right now… She believes the UK let her down and left her hanging, I bet she wasn’t planning to pay her UK taxes on her illegal earnings, doing her little bit for our Country.

I recover, abducted children from some countries most people have never heard of and I take the risk of 25yrs in prison as minimum punishment for my actions in some countries, I take on-board the risks when I plan my contracts and therefore have no grounds for defence if caught.

When it comes to drug smuggling, I have no sympathy for anyone.


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#19    Jessica Christ

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 11:26 AM

I can balance the concerns of respecting another country's laws and knowing that the death penalty is wrong. You have as well but we are going to weigh them differently.

Whether she thinks Britain abandoned her is not my greatest concern and neither is your sympathy or lack of it when it comes to drug smuggling.


#20    freetoroam

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 11:33 AM

View Postxsas, on 24 April 2013 - 10:54 AM, said:

The real issue here is that. Each and everyone knows the consequences when doing something illegal in another country. When you enter someone else’s house there are rules and regulations to abide to.

Regardless to anyone’s personal belief in a death penalty.. that is not the issue.

She took a risk and got caught, had she not got caught and earned a nice payday from her actions, I bet she would be living off the rewards of them right now… She believes the UK let her down and left her hanging, I bet she wasn’t planning to pay her UK taxes on her illegal earnings, doing her little bit for our Country.

I recover, abducted children from some countries most people have never heard of and I take the risk of 25yrs in prison as minimum punishment for my actions in some countries, I take on-board the risks when I plan my contracts and therefore have no grounds for defence if caught.

When it comes to drug smuggling, I have no sympathy for anyone.
Could not agree more. :tu: :tu: :tu:

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#21    Mr Right Wing

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:08 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 22 April 2013 - 09:54 PM, said:

I could care less :no:

Did she know that what she was doing was Illegal? Did she know what the penalties in the Country are? Did she hope to make lots of money from her activities?

keep within the laws of the Country of which you are living - fairly basic advice actually. Why should the UK Taxpayer pay for the defence of a drug Mule??

We could always volunteer the firing squad.

Drug smuggling trash.


#22    keithisco

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:41 PM

View PostLeave Britney alone!, on 24 April 2013 - 11:26 AM, said:

I can balance the concerns of respecting another country's laws and knowing that the death penalty is wrong. You have as well but we are going to weigh them differently.

Whether she thinks Britain abandoned her is not my greatest concern and neither is your sympathy or lack of it when it comes to drug smuggling.

You base your response on the Cultural and Moral norms of where you live. You "know" the death penalty is wrong, but that is just your amortizitation of your cultural beliefs. These beliefs are not Universal, they are Parochial,.


#23    Jessica Christ

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:51 PM

Still does not take away from the fact that in the course of history progress has seen many countries turn from favoring capital punishment to abolishing it. In time even they will follow suit.

It happens on every front, slavery, women's rights, worker's rights, and general human rights. Some can say look how horrible India is for letting their workers burn in factories. We too were horrible but instilled safety measures after the deadly Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. Our media showed us, made us aware, and there was progress made. India and the world are pubclicizing this now due to their recent incidents and progress will arrive shortly there.

The same goes for human sacrifice, society after society stopped doing it, they switched to animals, then to fruit, or just giving up a bad habit. Long ago so many societes used to practice that even some as we see as the font of ancient civilization. People just internally realize and change.

So what you said is true but takes nothing away from our right to pressure using soft power (not force or violence) to help them with progress. That does not mean instill our views on them.

Edited by Leave Britney alone!, 24 April 2013 - 05:53 PM.


#24    keithisco

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:08 PM

View PostLeave Britney alone!, on 24 April 2013 - 05:51 PM, said:

Still does not take away from the fact that in the course of history progress has seen many countries turn from favoring capital punishment to abolishing it. In time even they will follow suit.

It happens on every front, slavery, women's rights, worker's rights, and general human rights. Some can say look how horrible India is for letting their workers burn in factories. We too were horrible but instilled safety measures after the deadly Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. Our media showed us, made us aware, and there was progress made. India and the world are pubclicizing this now due to their recent incidents and progress will arrive shortly there.

The same goes for human sacrifice, society after society stopped doing it, they switched to animals, then to fruit, or just giving up a bad habit. Long ago so many societes used to practice that even some as we see as the font of ancient civilization. People just internally realize and change.

So what you said is true but takes nothing away from our right to pressure using soft power (not force or violence) to help them with progress. That does not mean instill our views on them.
This has nothing to do with Human Sacrifice (murdering the innocent to placate some unKnowable God). This has nothing to do with Human Rights, Womens' Emancipation, or anything else.

This is about respecting another Sovereign Nation's Laws, if, through foreign pressure, these laws are diminished, then simply, you do not go there to break their laws.

The indigenous peoples are subject to the same law, but NOBODY ever comes on this forum to say that the sentence is wrong.


#25    Jessica Christ

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:13 PM

Still going to disagree with your general position. My view favors progress, just as Britain abolished slavery, made commentary toward us about it without force, and soon we followed suit, the same will happen in this instance toward other countries in the matter of capital punishment.

Soft power is effective, we have every right to employ it as a free society to those less so.

Your main view seems to be that no one has a right to break laws in other countries, that is not a topic I am discussing other than to generally agree, that main point neither speaks to this other one, or counters its, and it seems trivial in light of other issues.

Quote

Foreign Office Minister Baroness Warsi has made a statement to mark the ninth anniversary of the World Day Against the Death Penalty on 10 October, and the fifth anniversary of the European Day Against the Death Penalty.

"It is the longstanding policy of the UK Government to oppose the death penalty in all circumstances as a matter of principle. There is no evidence of its deterrent value and any miscarriage of justice is irreversible and irreparable.

"Since the Government launched its Strategy for Abolition of the Death Penalty in October 2011, we have continued to take action against our three goals, and taken all appropriate opportunities to raise the issue with our priority countries. Our work has also included support for civil society projects in different parts of the world, which are helping gather support for worldwide abolition.

"There have been several positive developments over the last year: I was particularly pleased to note the ratification by Benin, in July this year, of the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which aims at the abolition of the death penalty. I was also pleased to see the State of Connecticut repealing the death penalty in April this year, becoming the 17th US state to do so.

"At the same time I am concerned about the sharp increase in executions during the past twelve months in some of those countries which still apply and implement the death penalty. Later this year, the United Nations General Assembly will for the fourth time debate a resolution which advocates a worldwide moratorium on the use of the death penalty. I would particularly encourage those states which have a long-standing moratorium in force, to consider joining the growing world trend against the death penalty and to vote in favour of the Resolution."

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Edited by Leave Britney alone!, 24 April 2013 - 06:16 PM.


#26    keithisco

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:22 PM

View PostLeave Britney alone!, on 24 April 2013 - 06:13 PM, said:

Still going to disagree with your general position. My view favors progress, just as Britain abolished slavery, made commentary toward us about it, and soon we followed suit, the same will happen in this instance toward other countries in the matter of capital punishment.

It is effective, we have every right.

Your main view seems to be that no one has a right to break laws in other countries, that is not a topic I am discussing other than to generally agree, that main point neither speaks to this other one, or counters its, and it seems trivial to me in light of other issues.



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What makes you think that other Nations laws are trivial??. What makes you believe that the abolition of the Death Penalty is somehow "progressive"? I think you live in a Country where every Liberal argument is Valid. When the truth is that Liberalism does not condone certain actions, and Liberalists would not condone the imprisonment of "Social Defaulters" for life at the cost of the taxpayers.

You have every right to break the Laws in the Country in which you reside, you do NOT have the right to try to evade the consequences of your actions in said countries, you do not have the right to appeal to your country of Birth for special rights.

Be rid of them!!

Edited by keithisco, 24 April 2013 - 06:26 PM.


#27    Jessica Christ

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:26 PM

To clarify, it is not the laws of other countries that are trivial, it is only the view that people should respect other laws seems trivial compared to the view that the death penalty should be abolished. Two people can spend their time and energy on one cause or the other, how many organizations are there that do so insuring foreigners respect laws of others when on vacation compared to how many organizations there are whose cause is to abolish capital punishment?

One seems a more worthy cause to me, that is all, you can disagree.

Also, did not the Queen, whom both me and you admire I believe, also oppose the death penalty? Did not the first action to abolish it in the UK begin during her first year after her coronation? I know it is a minor point but I did want to remind you of it. God save the Queen. The death penalty...well not so much, it doesn't need saving.

Edited by Leave Britney alone!, 24 April 2013 - 06:27 PM.


#28    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 01:20 AM

She broke the law.
She KNOWINGLY broke the law.
Lets not get away from that in favour of our own hobby horses about the death penalty or whatever.
She knew the risks. And she did it anyway.
She did something that in her own country would be equally illegal.

You object to the punishment. good for you.
Well I object to people profiting from the misery of other people, from making money off of suffering and addiction. Shoot her. Lock her up forever. I honestly don't care.

I must not fear. Fear is the Mind-Killer. It is the little death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and to move through me. And when it is gone I will turn the inner eye to see it's path.
When the fear is gone, there will be nothing.
Only I will remain.

#29    Jessica Christ

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 02:22 AM

Or we could just send her to Asutralia as punishment just like in the good old days!


#30    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 03:13 AM

View PostLeave Britney alone!, on 25 April 2013 - 02:22 AM, said:

Or we could just send her to Asutralia as punishment just like in the good old days!
no thanks, we've enoguh drug dealers here as it is.

I must not fear. Fear is the Mind-Killer. It is the little death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and to move through me. And when it is gone I will turn the inner eye to see it's path.
When the fear is gone, there will be nothing.
Only I will remain.




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