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Doggerland


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#811    King Fluffs

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 06:08 PM

Doggerland?
Haha, dogging means something different around here.


#812    Abramelin

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 06:14 PM

View PostKing Fluffs, on 30 October 2012 - 06:08 PM, said:

Doggerland?
Haha, dogging means something different around here.

I had to google that one: http://en.wikipedia...._(sexual_slang)

Well, maybe Adam and Eve were born in Doggerland, lol.

But alas, the name of the sunken land wasn't "Doggingland".

.

Edited by Abramelin, 30 October 2012 - 06:26 PM.


#813    whitegandalf

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 09:40 PM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 30 October 2012 - 05:45 PM, said:

Your evidence for this is what, exactly?

No material, to include titanium, when added to 99.5% aluminum would make it the hardest material known today. Care to try again.

cormac

Small amounts of scandium (0.1%-0.5%) are added to aluminium to improve crystallization parameters in welded aluminium components. Aluminium-scandium alloys have increased strength and have some use in aerospace. They were used in Russian the MiG-21 and MiG-29 fighter jets and some missiles, however titanium alloys are generally considered to be a more cost effective solution with similar performance. [1] Some sports equipment has been made with scandium alloys - including racing bicycle parts, baseball bats, golf clubs and lacrosse sticks. Some revolver frames are made using scandium alloys

http://www.criticalm...m/scandium.html


#814    cormac mac airt

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 10:00 PM

View Postwhitegandalf, on 30 October 2012 - 09:40 PM, said:

Small amounts of scandium (0.1%-0.5%) are added to aluminium to improve crystallization parameters in welded aluminium components. Aluminium-scandium alloys have increased strength and have some use in aerospace. They were used in Russian the MiG-21 and MiG-29 fighter jets and some missiles, however titanium alloys are generally considered to be a more cost effective solution with similar performance. [1] Some sports equipment has been made with scandium alloys - including racing bicycle parts, baseball bats, golf clubs and lacrosse sticks. Some revolver frames are made using scandium alloys

http://www.criticalm...m/scandium.html

While Scandium does have its uses that doesn't make it's addition to aluminum "the hardest material known today" which is what you claimed. So this claim too is apparently wrong.

cormac

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#815    whitegandalf

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 10:37 PM

So tell me of a material that is stronger. .


#816    whitegandalf

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 10:53 PM

Doggerland had permanent settlements in norway many thousands of years before it sank in the sea. Therefor their culture, language and people woud have survived and lived on, Although damaged too by the devestating tsunami, its land was not claimed for good by the sea.

The doggerland and coast norway settlers was not traditional hunter and gatheres, they were seafarers and fishers. If they had permanent settlements and food storages in norway, they had to have the possibility to live in permanent houses and villages in doggerland too..


#817    cormac mac airt

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 12:40 AM

View Postwhitegandalf, on 30 October 2012 - 10:37 PM, said:

So tell me of a material that is stronger. .

Titanium alloys for one. Scandium isn't used in Aluminum-Scandium alloys for it's strength, overall. It's used for its ability to resist hot-cracking during welding. And that doesn't make it the strongest material, regarless of your claim. None of which you've shown any evidence as having to do with a Halogaland Kingdom.

Quote

Doggerland had permanent settlements in norway many thousands of years before it sank in the sea.

Still waiting on you to show evidence of any such permanent settlements in Norway c.8000BC. So far you've shown none.

cormac

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#818    whitegandalf

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 06:22 AM

The scandium bulletproof wests are the best known on the marked, if you want the strongest bikeframes, baseballbats or golf clubs Scandium is the obvious choice. The best armoured vehicles today contains scandium aliminium alloy. Smith and wesson uses it in all their weapons.

"Scandium alloys were first used by the Soviet Union in the '70s to make fins for rockets strong enough to be fired through the arctic ice sheet, a feat which the many Americans had thought impossible. Because the only major scandium mine in the world is located in Ukraine scandium was solely used by the Soviet military until the end of the Cold War in 1991."

http://everything2.com/title/scandium

It is the hardest most durabel lightweight material out there. Although every material has its uses and properties, when you dont need to care about the weight, i guess titanium could maybe be as strong or stronger. I dont know and i dont care. Scandium alloy is still a damn strong material and contains 99,5% aliminium and 0,5% scandium.








I agree its a bit off topic, but still a fact.

Edited by whitegandalf, 31 October 2012 - 06:23 AM.


#819    whitegandalf

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 08:58 AM

Sorry again for my inaccuracy... I might have interpeted the information a bit wrong. The first settlements with permanent houses with stonewalls and grassroof was built 7500-8000bc on the island of vega and soon after other places along the coast, However it is not proven that this was used all year round. They say it might just be very large sort of capital places during the hunting/fishing season..

http://en.wikipedia....nsbacka_culture

However the first people to live in Norway (season or nomadic) in tents came around 10.000bc/11.000bc

"The Komsa culture (Komsakulturen) was a Mesolithic culture of hunter-gatherers that existed from around 10000 BC in Northern Norway."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komsa

"Scandinavian prehistory began when the Scandinavian peninsula, formerly entirely covered by thick ice, became free of ice at the end of the last ice age, around 11,000 BC. At that time, a hunter gatherer people, the Ahrensburg culture, lived and hunted near the edge of the ice"

http://en.wikipedia....vian_prehistory

The first "confirmed" houses with permanent all season inhabitants was built around 3500-4000bc, the same as Orkney Islands.

Link is coming (much of the information is in norwegian)

Edited by whitegandalf, 31 October 2012 - 09:06 AM.


#820    spud the mackem

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 09:57 AM

Doggerland existed,there is an area in the North Sea known as the Doggerbanks,which is a good fishing area,also there is a petrified forest just off the North-East coast at very low tides you can see the remainder of tops of trees,about a mile North of Sunderland.Also a lot of shipwrecks occured there in the past.

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#821    whitegandalf

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 10:37 AM

The permanent residential "houses", not tents, (inhabited part of the year) of Åsgården in the Vega, Norway Islands is 6330 bc /7200-7500bc old ?
Not sure, i will return..

http://books.google....en vega&f=false

page 93-95

Edited by whitegandalf, 31 October 2012 - 11:22 AM.


#822    whitegandalf

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 11:19 AM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 30 October 2012 - 04:57 PM, said:

Do you have a citation/s to support this claim? I ask because the oldest evidence of modern human activity in Sweden or Norway I've seen is the Dumpokjauratj Site, which dates to c.8630 +/- 85 BP (6630 +/- 85 BC). Obviouisly this is not 8000 BC. Nor do the oldest sites in Orkney such as Skara Brae, Knap of Howar, Ness of Brodgar or the Barnhouse Settlement date to c.6500 BC as you seem to imply. They all date to the 4th millenium BC.

cormac

This site is 9200bc old

http://www.nrk.no/ny...ur/3059683.html (in norwegian)


#823    cormac mac airt

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 01:04 PM

Quote

Sorry again for my inaccuracy... I might have interpeted the information a bit wrong. The first settlements with permanent houses with stonewalls and grassroof was built 7500-8000bc on the island of vega and soon after other places along the coast...

What you're calling permanent houses are pit-houses, which shouldn't be confused with actual house structures such as Abramelin has show before. Pit-houses aren't anything more than large  dug out holes in the ground covered with turf, etc.

Quote

This site is 9200bc old.

Translated from that site:

Quote

There are 11 000 years ago the smoke from fire sites that archaeologists now digs up under the turf of Aukra in Møre og Romsdal. This settlement was at this time the Beach's edge, and in the sands archaeologists have so far found all 35,000 artifacts from the stone age and the younger iron age.
We have found over 20 axes and closer to 90 arrowheads, says field leader Tor Arne Varås.
Across the country there have been found settlements from this time, but it is especially in the United States are all fire places.
-You don't need more than two hands to count all the places in Norway where we have found charcoal, and here alone there are 12 hearths, says Birch.


Twelve (12) hearths do not constitute permanent settlement houses dating to 8000 BC, which again was your claim.

cormac

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#824    whitegandalf

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 05:45 PM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 30 October 2012 - 04:57 PM, said:

I ask because the oldest evidence of modern human activity in Sweden or Norway I've seen is the Dumpokjauratj Site, which dates to c.8630 +/- 85 BP (6630 +/- 85 BC).

cormac

The last link is not about permanent settlements but a answer to your claim that there are no evidence of human activity in Sweden or Norway before 6630bc

The link shows human activity 9200bc.


Sorry, i did not see the word modern. I missunderstood.

Edited by whitegandalf, 01 November 2012 - 06:17 PM.


#825    whitegandalf

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 06:02 PM

View Postcormac mac airt, on 31 October 2012 - 01:04 PM, said:

What you're calling permanent houses are pit-houses, which shouldn't be confused with actual house structures such as Abramelin has show before. Pit-houses aren't anything more than large  dug out holes in the ground covered with turf, etc.


cormac

Still permanent houses with a door, hole in the roof for smoke and no windows, like orkney. Both were also pithouses, dug partly down into the ground and probably had similar roof,  maybe not as impressive as Orkney 4000bc, but that was not a debate. Wether the walls is of lokal Orkney stone, or of local Norwegian stones and dirt is not relevant. It is not around 8.000bc but 7500bc, sorry about that.

This means that the Doggerlanders had permanent "cabins" in Norway (where they lived part of the year) before it sank, Why wouldent some of them had permanent "cabins" on their homeland too?

Edited by whitegandalf, 01 November 2012 - 06:20 PM.





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