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Early human ancestors were ‘aquatic apes’


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#31    shrooma

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:03 PM

copasetic said-
'can you find anything that says we share ''50% of our DNA with bananas''? I'm guessing not'
.
http://www.thenakeds...p?topic=39643.0

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#32    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 09:38 PM

View Postshrooma, on 01 May 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

copasetic said-
'can you find anything that says we share ''50% of our DNA with bananas''? I'm guessing not'
.
http://www.thenakeds...p?topic=39643.0

I say

we share 75% of our DNA as nnematode worms.

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For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#33    Copasetic

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:32 AM

View Postshrooma, on 01 May 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

copasetic said-
'can you find anything that says we share ''50% of our DNA with bananas''? I'm guessing not'
.
http://www.thenakeds...p?topic=39643.0

I meant something published and reputable. And like I pointed out, the context is important. That is really what that post you linked is talking about. The context of "we share x% of dna with y" type statements.


#34    docyabut2

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 11:04 AM

Do like the theroy and sounds reasonable, but apes have never lost their hair due to swimming in water as homo sapians did,unless it was the salt water that made us lose our hair.There is that theory that a mouse deer  went back into the water losing it hair and became a whale.

http://www.scienceda...71220220241.htm


#35    docyabut2

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 01:51 AM

Controversial theory that seeks to explain one of the great leaps of human evolution finds new support but still divides scientists.



http://www.guardian....imate-evolution


#36    docyabut2

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 02:15 AM

I kinda go along with the theory but in a different sense.I don`nt think we came from a aquatic ape or hommid persay, but homo sapians turned hairless and develop  bigger sinuses by living by and in crossing the oceans waters. Much like the little dear mammal that return to ocean waters and became a whale. :) Really we don`nt know if eariler homsapians were hairless.

Edited by docyabut2, 11 May 2013 - 02:18 AM.


#37    g00dfella

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 02:42 AM

View Postdocyabut2, on 11 May 2013 - 02:15 AM, said:

I kinda go along with the theory but in a different sense.I don`nt think we came from a aquatic ape or hommid persay, but homo sapians turned hairless and develop  bigger sinuses by living by and in crossing the oceans waters. Much like the little dear mammal that return to ocean waters and became a whale. :) Really we don`nt know if eariler homsapians were hairless.


Jesus, grammar check please...


#38    AliveInDeath7

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:34 AM

I understand you might be of foreign country, but you won't be accounted credible by your skills, unfortunately.
The culprit is the common idiot found so often around video games or scoffing at excellence and knowledge.

I already know that you are the latter..
Why can't people speak English in America? Because they'd rather go yolo. -barfs


#39    docyabut2

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:46 AM

View Postg00dfella, on 11 May 2013 - 02:42 AM, said:

Jesus, grammar check please...


Grammer or no grammer, I think you get what I mean:), there are no animals or mammels that have gotten hairless by going into fresh water. but there maybe be of the salt water and like I said we don`nt really know if earlier homo sapians were hairless, much like we don`nt know if the dinos were hairless or unfeathered.:)


#40    Frank Merton

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:51 AM

Someone please straighten me out, but I thought the aquatic theory had been debunked twenty years ago.


#41    Frank Merton

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:53 AM

View PostAliveInDeath7, on 11 May 2013 - 03:34 AM, said:

I understand you might be of foreign country, but you won't be accounted credible by your skills, unfortunately.
The culprit is the common idiot found so often around video games or scoffing at excellence and knowledge.

I already know that you are the latter..
Why can't people speak English in America? Because they'd rather go yolo. -barfs
English is a living language and cannot be expected to adhere to rules invented a century ago.


#42    aquatus1

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 07:16 AM

View Postdocyabut2, on 11 May 2013 - 02:15 AM, said:

I kinda go along with the theory but in a different sense.I don`nt think we came from a aquatic ape or hommid persay, but homo sapians turned hairless and develop  bigger sinuses by living by and in crossing the oceans waters. Much like the little dear mammal that return to ocean waters and became a whale. :) Really we don`nt know if eariler homsapians were hairless.

Don't know if I can really agree with that.  When you think about it, humans have about a 20 year generational rate.  Crossing ocean waters should (hopefully) take much less time.  Unless those early humans were spending decades inside the water, there is little reason it would affect them on an evolutionary basis.  Most human races aren't really all that affected by environmental factors (evolutionarily speaking) to begin with;  we are pretty good at changing the environment to meet our needs.

As far as the aquatic ape theory goes, it has too many aspects that are a bit too out there for me to consider it practical.  Specifically, their explanation for the hair sworl at the top of the head is kind of silly.


#43    docyabut2

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 12:05 PM

View Postaquatus1, on 11 May 2013 - 07:16 AM, said:

Don't know if I can really agree with that.  When you think about it, humans have about a 20 year generational rate.  Crossing ocean waters should (hopefully) take much less time.  Unless those early humans were spending decades inside the water, there is little reason it would affect them on an evolutionary basis.  Most human races aren't really all that affected by environmental factors (evolutionarily speaking) to begin with;  we are pretty good at changing the environment to meet our needs.

As far as the aquatic ape theory goes, it has too many aspects that are a bit too out there for me to consider it practical.  Specifically, their explanation for the hair sworl at the top of the head is kind of silly.


I`m not convinced that we came from all ready hairless water ape, or that we lost our hair by the sweat on the savanna . To me its more logical that  earlier homo  sapians may have been covered in hair, but  by adaption into the ocean salt waters by living. swimming and crossing became more aquatic losing the hair, ect.


#44    Frank Merton

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 12:41 PM

It really makes no sense; hair provides protection from insects, flying objects, the sun, cold, who knows what else.  Are human beings the only terrestrial animals to have so little of it?  The only thing I can figure is that some sort of sexual selection in favor of less hair was going on.


#45    docyabut2

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 09:46 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 11 May 2013 - 12:41 PM, said:

It really makes no sense; hair provides protection from insects, flying objects, the sun, cold, who knows what else.  Are human beings the only terrestrial animals to have so little of it?  The only thing I can figure is that some sort of sexual selection in favor of less hair was going on.


We homo sapians  are still pretty hairy:) so the event of losing that hair had to be fairly resent in the evolution process.





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