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Florida Sea Monster Controversy


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#1    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 05:27 PM

Florida Sea Monster Controversy

Hello guys, I found this video in the related column on YouTube when watching a MonsterQuest video. I would like you guys to watch it and give your opinions on the video in this thread.

Thanks in advance!


#2    loganXman

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 05:37 PM

i remember seein that ep. i wanna say it mite be a new species of manitee or something in that nature. that last clip from the guys website.....i dont know. looks like another animal all entirely, maybe an alligator

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#3    Sakari

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 05:52 PM

There was a seal and /or a few seals , swimming in the same area as Manitees....

Manitees ( spell check) get hit by props all the time , and their tails can look very bizarre.....

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#4    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 05:54 PM

I remember looking at the tail in a slowed down video and it was in three sections, like three different fins at the end?

Do you think maybe it was a manatee tail that had been caught in say a boat propeller or maybe this is a new creature?


#5    Cetacea

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 05:57 PM

Oh for goodness sake, not again. It's a manatee! It always was and it always will be! How anyone that has ever seen one could think it's anything but a manatee is absolutely beyond me. In one section there might have been more than one, probably a mating herd but the so called 'monster' was even identified at some point... I'll dig it up hold on..
Here we are:
Sea monster revealed

Posted Image

Posted Image
I'd be willing to bet if you phoned up Mote Marine Lab or the Fisheries services they would even give you a name or id number.

Those tail mutes are pretty common occurrence and sadly not the worst I've seen either....

Edited by Cetacea, 23 May 2010 - 06:04 PM.

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#6    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:04 PM

Yes, but the thing is, that tail is unfortunately in tatters, the sections I saw were nearly perfectly rounded, each one.


#7    Abramelin

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:05 PM

Although I am pretty sure the first part of the video shows manitees, and the second part nothing but a crocodile, the idea of the one posting this video on YouTube - suggesting the second animal might have been a mosasaur - isn't that stupid.

Mosasaurs were closely related to the present day monitor lizards.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosasaur
http://en.wikipedia..../Monitor_lizard

But does that mean there are still mosasaurs around???? Or else monitor lizards that developed flippers over time, thus resembling the extinct mosasaurs even more??

Well, that would be an interesting possibility, although the video doesn't prove anything in that respect.

To me it's a video about manitees and a croc.


#8    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:13 PM

Yes I believe it could be Manatee's and a crocodile but it does leave room for exploration, could Florida waters be home to a Mosasaur? I highly doubt it, but it would be great!


#9    Cetacea

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:15 PM

View PostCryptidConnor, on 23 May 2010 - 06:04 PM, said:

Yes, but the thing is, that tail is unfortunately in tatters, the sections I saw were nearly perfectly rounded, each one.
I've done photo-id on manatees before and personally, from what I could see I think this manatee is a pretty good fit. Either way, every tail looks different, that's why they are used as identification.
In one part there is probably more than one, probably mating which is why the movement is a bit more rapid than you would expect.
It's once again people trying to make something out of nothing.
There are loads of research boats in that bit of FLorida, Fish and Wildlife, Mote, various universities studying manatees, bottlenose dolphins and bottlenose dolphin prey species around the clock, I severely doubt a major predator would go unnoticed....
The simple explanation might not be exciting but it's the best fit.

Edited by Cetacea, 23 May 2010 - 06:17 PM.

"There is about as much educational benefit to be gained in studying dolphins in captivity as there would be studying mankind by observing prisoners held in solitary confinement" - Jacques Cousteau

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#10    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:18 PM

I know you are a marine biologist if my memory is correct and you do have a great level of intelligence. But do you not think an animal like that could avoid being spotted? I mean many creatures in the oceans and possibly rivers can go by unnoticed?


#11    Cetacea

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:27 PM

A population of 17m air-breathing predators go unnoticed in a well studied eco-system? No carcasses, no ecological impact, no accounts? No I don't think so.
Alright, some species are smaller but the smallest was still, what 4m? So best case scenario we are looking at a population of 4 m air breathing predators in a well studied eco system without carcasses, ecological impacts or sightings.
No. Not a chance imho.
The fact alone the person who made the video uses the term 'evolutionist' ist pretty damning in my opinion.

"There is about as much educational benefit to be gained in studying dolphins in captivity as there would be studying mankind by observing prisoners held in solitary confinement" - Jacques Cousteau

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#12    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:31 PM

It's nice to hear well educated peoples opinions as im only fourteen years old.


#13    Cetacea

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:34 PM

View PostCryptidConnor, on 23 May 2010 - 06:31 PM, said:

It's nice to hear well educated peoples opinions as im only fourteen years old.
It's nice to have people listen :) I'm sure there are some undiscovered species out there but I doubt that they will be as spectacular as many people want them to be.

"There is about as much educational benefit to be gained in studying dolphins in captivity as there would be studying mankind by observing prisoners held in solitary confinement" - Jacques Cousteau

"We're not unique, just at one end of the spectrum."

#14    Connor.

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:39 PM

I know this is off-topic slightly but I have an interest in becoming a marine biologist. Can you tell me the process of becoming one, what grades you require etc?

Your help would be greatly appreciated! :D

Edited by CryptidConnor, 23 May 2010 - 06:40 PM.


#15    Long_Gone

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 06:36 AM

Oh no, Not the old 'conspiracy cover-up' again. Jaysus. It's not a 'sea monster' by any means, I don't see why it can't be just a manatee.





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