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Milky Way's Sister Galaxy Shines in Portrait


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#1    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 11:18 PM

Milky Way's Sister Galaxy Shines in New Portrait

The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics press release is reproduced below:

[b]Release No.: 06-19
For Release: For Release: Wednesday, June 14, 2006

Cambridge, MA - Sibling rivalry is alive and well in outer space. The Milky Way galaxy has two sister spirals competing for attention from photographers. The Andromeda galaxy usually wins the contest, posing frequently for cosmic portraits. In this new image from the MMT Observatory's 6.5-meter telescope, the second sister finally gets her due notice. Here, the Triangulum galaxy emerges from the shadows to reveal stunning swirls of stars and dust dotted with brilliant pink nebulae.

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This photograph of the Triangulum galaxy (M33) was taken with the MMT Observatory's new Megacam instrument, a 340-megapixel monster that some have described as a "turbocharged" household digital camera. M33 is a sister galaxy to the Milky Way. It lies about 2.4 million light-years from Earth and spans about twice the diameter of the full moon. Credit: N. Caldwell, B. McLeod, and A. Szentgyorgyi (SAO)

The new photograph of the Triangulum galaxy showcases the dazzling capabilities of MMT's new Megacam instrument. Megacam was developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in Cambridge, Mass., under the direction of astronomer Brian McLeod. This state-of-the-art camera consists of 36 CCD chips, each of which contains 9 million picture elements (pixels), making Megacam one of the largest digital cameras in the world

"Megacam is like a turbocharged household digital camera," said SAO astronomer Nelson Caldwell. "While a typical digital camera might have eight or nine megapixels, Megacam has 340 megapixels."

Caldwell and McLeod picked the Triangulum galaxy to be one of the first objects photographed by Megacam. This galaxy, also known as Messier 33 or M33 for its designation in the catalog compiled by Charles Messier, lies about 2.4 million light-years from Earth. It spans about twice the diameter of the full moon in the night sky. Although large, its light is diffuse, making it a challenging object to spot with the unaided eye. The view of M33 is best in binoculars or small telescopes at low magnification.

Newly formed blue stars and dark dusty patches outline the spiral arms of M33. Pink filaments of hydrogen gas mark regions of active star formation similar to the Milky Way's Orion Nebula. The eye-catching nebula at upper left in this image, designated NGC 604, stretches across an impressive 1,500 light-years and holds more than 200 hot, young stars that light it from within.

The Triangulum galaxy is the smallest of the three spirals in the local neighborhood, holding as much mass as 10-40 billion suns. In comparison, the Milky Way holds about 200 billion suns' worth of normal matter, while Andromeda is even heftier.

"Triangulum is not a colossal giant like the Milky Way or Andromeda," said Caldwell. "But it has a charm and beauty of its own that belies its junior citizen status."

The MMT telescope contains a primary mirror 256 inches (6.5 meters) in diameter, making it among the largest optical telescopes in the world. Astronomers use the MMT for various projects such as searching for extrasolar planets, making 3-d maps of galaxies in space, and finding quasars that existed when the universe was only one-tenth of its present age. SAO operates the MMT Observatory, located south of Tucson, Ariz., in partnership with the University of Arizona.

Headquartered in Cambridge, Mass., the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is a joint collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory. CfA scientists, organized into six research divisions, study the origin, evolution and ultimate fate of the universe.


Source: CfA Press Release

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#2    Master Sage

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 12:26 AM

I perosnaly dont belive you can see this with your naked eye. To diffuse. Cool pic anyway.

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#3    frogfish

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 12:28 AM

You CAN see the Andromeda Galaxy with the naked eye on a good day...Its the farthest Deep Space Object visible to the naked eye.

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#4    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 12:52 AM

Quote


I perosnaly dont belive you can see this with your naked eye. To diffuse. Cool pic anyway.


People with perfect eyesight are just about capable of seeing M33 with the naked eye if they know exactly where to look. It needs very dark skies, well away from towns or cities. It also needs a technigue which involves looking at an object through the periphery of you vision rather than looking directly at it. This allows more light to fall on the rods of your eye rather than the cones. Rods are more light sensitive and hence can see dimmer objects at night.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#5    shun

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 03:16 AM

Is it just me, or are these not the most perfect foreground stars imaginable? I have never seen such three dimensional appearance, as these.

Impressive results from a powerful instrument. But, clean-up may be superior, to match.
Space platforms have cosmic rays to contend with. Ground instruments have atmospheric effects. But, the end result has always been HST is the one to beat.

I guess we now have some post-Hubble instruments, and there may be more to come.


#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 03:56 AM

Quote


Is it just me, or are these not the most perfect foreground stars imaginable? I have never seen such three dimensional appearance, as these.


shun, if you think that image is stunning, try having a look at the high resolution version: HERE.

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#7    Roj47

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 09:38 AM

Probably the milky way, but I am lucky enough to live near the countryside in England.

Know what you mean about the corner of the eye.... Not sure what it is, but looking skywards I often see a huge collection of stars that seem encased in a gas.

From my perspective it would measure about 5-7mm in size.

Amazing what you can see when you look on a clear unlit night original.gif

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#8    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 11:21 AM

Quote



Know what you mean about the corner of the eye.... Not sure what it is, but looking skywards I often see a huge collection of stars that seem encased in a gas.



I would think that is the Pleiedes you are seeing, especially if it is more of a winter thing.

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