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One in Five Stars Has Earth-sized Planet

exoplanets habitable zone keck observatory kepler

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#16    calaf

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 12:09 AM

Wouldn't it be dandy if we figured out how to coexist on this world before we screw up another?


#17    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 12:23 AM

View Postcalaf, on 08 November 2013 - 12:09 AM, said:

Wouldn't it be dandy if we figured out how to coexist on this world before we screw up another?

Taking into account that we aren't actually capable of reaching any of these planets yet your comment is relevant how exactly?

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#18    coolguy

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 06:01 AM

I bet there is plenty of life on these planets humans on one.
Dino's on others aliens on some to


#19    highdesert50

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 06:43 AM

As our abilities to more accurately probe these planets becomes more sophisticated, the opportunity to compare the probabilistic events that led to the emergence of man on Earth as compared to environmentally identical worlds should yield rather interesting insights relative to randomness of brief cataclysmic events and those of subtle but sustained evolution.


#20    brkuzma

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 08:16 AM

Just because WE HUMANS can't survive naked on a planet it doesn't make it inhabitable for life. I bet there are only a handful that are like Earth.


#21    Frank Merton

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 08:32 AM

I'm doubtful we will find much in the way of "advanced" life, since if it were common it seems we should already have seen various sorts of signs of it.  However, earth-like or nearly earth-like planets that we can adapt to hold no end of wonderful possibility, so long as they are not already occupied.

If they are already occupied, they may be off bounds for us as the chemistries almost certainly will not be able to tolerate each other, and interfering with local evolution would hold huge moral consequences.


#22    Mind Explorer

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 11:03 AM

Man...this is exciting! I can invision in a 1000 years a Star Trek type of scenario lol.

View Postbrkuzma, on 08 November 2013 - 08:16 AM, said:

Just because WE HUMANS can't survive naked on a planet it doesn't make it inhabitable for life. I bet there are only a handful that are like Earth.

Agreed. This also solves the whole 'habitable zone' argument. Just because it's uninhabitable to us doesn't mean some other species could not have evolved on it.

View PostFrank Merton, on 08 November 2013 - 08:32 AM, said:

I'm doubtful we will find much in the way of "advanced" life, since if it were common it seems we should already have seen various sorts of signs of it.  However, earth-like or nearly earth-like planets that we can adapt to hold no end of wonderful possibility, so long as they are not already occupied.

If they are already occupied, they may be off bounds for us as the chemistries almost certainly will not be able to tolerate each other, and interfering with local evolution would hold huge moral consequences.

The ol' Prime Directive huh.  Unless there is some change when we start deep space travel..I doubt moral consequences will stop humans from doing anything. Just look at the history of our species.

Also, I wouldn't say there isn't much 'advanced life'. We haven't even really began to look for it yet.


#23    lightly

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 01:24 PM

We have a tendency to think that planets must be earth-like to sustain life?    .. and that  Life forms would be  ' familiar '  .    Maybe ...  maybe not.

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#24    Frank Merton

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 01:37 PM

View Postlightly, on 08 November 2013 - 01:24 PM, said:

We have a tendency to think that planets must be earth-like to sustain life? .. and that  Life forms would be  ' familiar '  . Maybe ...  maybe not.
Not for lack of trying but no one has proposed a chemistry other than the one based on carbon chains that seems like it would work at all well in living things.  For that reason you need water in a liquid state and hence certain temperatures and pressures.  Whether the similarities need go further (such as using amino acids) is less assured, but it seems likely.


#25    lightly

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 08:13 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 08 November 2013 - 01:37 PM, said:

Not for lack of trying but no one has proposed a chemistry other than the one based on carbon chains that seems like it would work at all well in living things.  For that reason you need water in a liquid state and hence certain temperatures and pressures.  Whether the similarities need go further (such as using amino acids) is less assured, but it seems likely.

   Thank you Frank,    hm..    i see!

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#26    Harte

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 04:43 PM

I can't get past the "humans can't survive naked" comment.

Who walks around naked anyway?

If there are some planets we could survive on naked, how much is the cover charge?

Last one: on one of the naked planets, - is the majority of the population young?  If not, I'm pretty sure I don't want to go there!

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