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Astronomers Find Sun’s ‘Long-Lost Brother’

sun star formation hd 162826

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#16    Frank Merton

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 08:57 AM

Two things are pretty wonderful: that they are able to measure the chemical composition so well, especially of extremely rare molecules, and that they are able to trace back the orbit of the star through several galactic revolutions

Except maybe for panspermia, I don't think this makes these stars significantly better as candidates for life than other similar stars born elsewhere.  They will all be roughly the same age though, which might have a bearing.


#17    regeneratia

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 07:29 PM

I have almost always believed that our sun has a sister. I consider it's apogee and perigee is always in my thoughts when the topic of global warming comes into the conversation.


#18    regeneratia

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 07:59 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 12 May 2014 - 01:43 PM, said:

Despite the fact that I explained it in very simple terms you really don't understand the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis at all.

The "Rare Earth" hypothesis is exactly what it's name suggests, a hypothesis that says planets like Earth are rare. It sets out a series of conditions which limit the probability of life existing else where in the Universe. These conditions are based on the conditions found on Earth. As the Earth is found in the Milky Way galaxy it stands to reason that the Milky Way galaxy MUST have the right conditions to find a planet like Earth. This is not some great revelation you have made here, it's simply a case of stating the bloody obvious.

The point of the "Rare Earth" hypothesis is not to say that the Milky Way is suitable for life... we already know that, it's to say that many other galaxies AREN'T.

Your statement is like saying that Waspie_Dwarf's cat lives in Waspie_Dwarf's living-room. That means that Wapie-Dwarf's house must have the correct condition's for Waspie_Dwarf's cat.. well d'uh! That goes without saying.

However just because the house is the perfect place to find the living room it does not mean that other rooms in Waspie_Dwarf's house MUST have cats. In fact the "Rare Earth" hypothesis would go further, it would say that is not enough to live in Waspie_Dwarf's house, the conditions must be the same as the living-room, hence finding further cats, even in Waspie_Dwarf's house are very unlikely.

If you had understood the "Rare Earth" hypothesis you would have understood that a galaxy very similar to the Milky Way is just one of many conditions that need to be met.

As usual your comment does nothing except advertise your total ignorance of the subject. As usual you did not answer the question asked which was:

Since it is virtually impossible to get a straight answer from you on anything I'll answer the question for you... The "Rare Earth" hypothesis has NOTHING to do with the article I posted.

Would it be too much to ask that you make on-topic comments? Since there is already a topic where the "Rare-Earth" hypothesis is being discussed I suggest that you use that if you wish to discuss it further.

Just where did you explain that? I see no explaination thus far.

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#19    aka CAT

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:33 AM

Taniwha should find of interest comments re:
‘Cluster Planets’: What They Tell Us
http://www.centauri-...ms.org/?p=29808
by PAUL GILSTER on JANUARY 15, 2014,
i.e.
henry cordova January 22, 2014 at 12:12
through
Henry Corova January 27, 2014 at 18:04
and, particularly in regard to earthlike planets,
Henry Cordova January 23, 2014 at 23:45

The first comment above in connection with
kzb January 23, 2014 at 14:23
[...]There is a possibility with globular clusters that I find fascinating:
there could be a large population of “delocalised planets”.
A great many planets are thought to be ejected or caused to leave
their birth system by close encounters in such clusters.
comes closest to explaining to me
the relationship between globular clusters’
and the sun’s leaving their birthplaces.
http://www.unexplain...8

Edited by aka CAT, 14 May 2014 - 04:38 AM.


#20    Frank Merton

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:55 AM

The sun seems to have been born in a normal gas cloud evolving into an open cluster and then the stars dispersing because of random motions.  That would imply the sun has dozens of siblings, if not thousands, scattered by now all around the galaxy.  We are only likely to identify those that are by chance relatively nearby.


#21    aka CAT

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:40 AM

Frank et al,  
Interesting as was my last quote,
it was not the one that linked GCs with stars.

View PostFrank Merton, on 14 May 2014 - 04:55 AM, said:

The sun seems to have been born in a normal gas cloud evolving into an open cluster and then the stars dispersing because of random motions.  That would imply the sun has dozens of siblings, if not thousands, scattered by now all around the galaxy.  We are only likely to identify those that are by chance relatively nearby.
They will find more sibling stars, but, given the process, maybe not that many, e.g.
"The team identified HD 162826 as our sun’s sibling by following up on 30 possible candidates [...]
But several factors are needed to really pin down a solar sibling, Ramirez said. In addition to chemical analysis,
his team also included information about the stars’ orbits —
where they had been and where they are going in their paths around the center of the Milky Way galaxy.
Considering both chemistry and orbits narrowed the field of candidates down to one: HD 162826."


Edited by aka CAT, 14 May 2014 - 05:43 AM.


#22    badeskov

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:26 AM

View Postregeneratia, on 13 May 2014 - 07:59 PM, said:

Just where did you explain that? I see no explaination thus far.

Uhm, the explanation was right there. Did you even read it?

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#23    regeneratia

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 03:40 AM

View Postbadeskov, on 14 May 2014 - 10:26 AM, said:

Uhm, the explanation was right there. Did you even read it?

Cheers,
Badeskov

I suggest you go back over the thread. The explanation followed his statement that he explained it.

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#24    taniwha

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 11:33 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 14 May 2014 - 04:55 AM, said:

The sun seems to have been born in a normal gas cloud evolving into an open cluster and then the stars dispersing because of random motions.  That would imply the sun has dozens of siblings, if not thousands, scattered by now all around the galaxy.  We are only likely to identify those that are by chance relatively nearby.

I wonder if stars born in these clusters also 'hatch'  in clusters similar to fish eggs all at the same time or even sub divide like biological cells.  I guess these things arent known until we can actually witness one in action.





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