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What are you currently reading?


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#16    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 09:40 PM

 DieChecker, on 10 May 2011 - 03:11 AM, said:

... due to family demands and need for sleep.
same here.

Anyways, I recently finished (fantasy) Wizard's First Rule by Terry Goodkind. Great book. I agree with first rule.
http://en.wikipedia....39;s_First_Rule
And I finished The fifth mountain by Paulo Coelho. Awesome book.
http://www.paulocoel...om/en/store.php

The Fifth Mountain is Paulo Coelho's inspiring story of the Biblical prophet Elijah. In the ninth century B.C., the Phoenician princess Jezebel orders the execution of all the prophets who refuse to seek safety in the land of Zarephath, where the unexpectedly finds true love with a young widow. But this newfound rapture is to be cut short, and Elijah sees all of his hopes and dreams irrevocably erased as he is swept into a whirlwind of events that threatens his very existence. In what is truly a literary milestone, Coelho gives a quietly moving account of a man touched by the hand of God who must triumph over his frustrations in a soul-shattering trail of faith.

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For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#17    Roddy

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 10:38 PM

Joshua, The man they called Jesus by Ian Jones

"There's been plenty of loopy theorising, plenty of intellectual arm wrestling, some fine scholary writing, but never an accurate picture of the man we have come to know as Jesus Christ - a man who knew sexual desire, despair and anger. A man who enjoyed good company, laughter, food and wine. Acclaimed author Ian Jones has spent years researching the man Christianity re-named Jesus Christ - Joshua."
Amazon.com - Link

Jesus by A.N. Wilson

"In Jesus: A Life, A.N. Wilson spends most of his energy on such demythologizing. Like Renan, Schweitzer, and Crossan before him, this biographer strives to tell a story about the "historical reality" of Jesus' life. To that end, Wilson summarizes scads of contemporary biblical scholarship, sifts through loads of archeological evidence, liberally cites the Dead Sea Scrolls, and, most productively, attends his finely-tuned literary ear to the biblical texts."
Amazon.com - Link

American Conspiracies by Jesse Ventura with Dick Russell

"Former Minnesota governor, navy SEAL, and pro rassler Ventura has a new truTVshow investigating but not necessarily debunking conspiracy theories." Amazon.com - Link


#18    Robbie333

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 10:41 PM

 kmt_sesh, on 10 May 2011 - 02:28 AM, said:

I thought it might be worthwhile to start a lighter thread. In a couple of other forums to which I've belonged, a popular ongoing discussion was about books that forum members were reading. It can be fun to learn a little about the literary interests of some of the people you've engaged in discussion or debate. I'll begin.

I'm currently reading The Buried Book, by David Damrosch. It's about the nineteenth-century excavation of the Assyrian tablets at Ninevah in present-day Iraq, the subsequent translations of them, the discovery of the Epic of Gilgamesh, and what this great tale meant to ancient Mesopotamia as well as to us today. I just started The Buried Book last night and already am liking it.

I also always try to read a book of fiction because I enjoy a good novel as much as anyone else, so right now I'm also reading one of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child's novels called The Cabinet of Curiosities. Well, in truth, it's more like I'm re-re-re-reading the book. This is one of the earlier books in the Agent Pendergast series, and one of my favorites. Preston and Child are a terrific writing team.

I hope others will choose to take part and share their reading interests with us. I like to link books to internet retailers like Amazon, as I did with the above selections, but there's no rule about that. Feel free just to share what you're reading.

Jump in! :tu:
I just finished "Little Gods" by Tim Pratt. A series of short stories in the Sci-Fi, surreal mode. Really fun read and great imagination. I loved all of the stories.

Robbie James

#19    The Gremlin

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 11:07 PM

im in the middle of reading a few at the moment:
The Satires of Horace and Persius
Michael Grant, The Emperor Constantine
Gillian Clark, Christianity and Roman Society
Daniel Bagur, Where the fish are: An Angler's Guide to Fish Behaviour
The SAS Survival Handbook
Terry Pratchet, Unseen Academicals
never far away from me is Geoffrey Bucknalls, Fly Fishing Tactics for Brown Trout +
Gathercoles' The Fly Tying Bible
and The Epic of Gilgamesh, for the millionth time.

it depends what mood im in, and how much time i got...Im not forced to read anything in particular at the moment so im enjoying drifting between these.

I rarely talk about such things but I once shoveled 18 tons of material in 11 min-
utes. It was under ideal conditions which allowed use of the legs and gravity
but I know no one who could have matched it and I do know work
.
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#20    The Gremlin

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 11:08 PM

oops x2 post

Edited by lil gremlin, 10 May 2011 - 11:09 PM.

I rarely talk about such things but I once shoveled 18 tons of material in 11 min-
utes. It was under ideal conditions which allowed use of the legs and gravity
but I know no one who could have matched it and I do know work
.
...Cladking
If you were a dragon wouldn't you rather eat fat, alocohol fill, Nordic giants, than stringy little Chinamen?   Draconic Chronicler.
You claim you do research and then disregard the fact the Pyramids were built by God, which is why no man-made computer can replicate it.  The Interpreter

#21    missmacabre13th

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 11:50 PM

I'm reading the House of Night Series by PC Cast. It's a "vampire" series. It's NOT like Twilight, though. :P


#22    kmt_sesh

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 01:22 AM

Wow, lots of contributions in short order. I really appreciate everyone taking part. Not only are there lots of books in these posts with which I'm unfamiliar, but quite a few of you posters, too. But of course many of the same ol' gang is here, so I feel right at home.

For anyone who's a fellow Preston and Child fan (I noticed susieice's post), the new Agent Pendergast novel, Cold Vengeance, will be released in early August. It picks up where the last one left off, in which we learned exactly how and why Perndgast's wife was murdered many years ago.

Susieice, the name of that last novel is Fever Dream. I loved it. Pendergast's deceased wife, Helen, was rarely even mentioned in the previous novels, so it was entertaining to learn all about that backstory.

I've taken a break from reading volumes about ancient Egypt while I again explore some of the other peoples and cultures with whom the Egyptians came into contact. However, Toby Wilkinson has published a new book called The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt that really interests me. Wilkinson is a noted scholar and Egyptologist but this book is a bit of a departure for someone of his standing: in it he explores the seedier and harsher background of life in pharaonic Egypt. It's true that many authors have probably portrayed pharaonic Egypt in overly idealistic terms, so I'll be buying this one soon enough. I've enjoyed everything else Wilkinson has written.

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#23    kmt_sesh

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 01:34 AM

 vitruvian12, on 10 May 2011 - 02:50 AM, said:

I just finished a book called "The Spartacus War". About the rebbelion he started that ended ultimately with his death and the destruction of his army (although not the way it ended in the Kirk Douglas movie). Im also in the middle of a history of Sparta, and interesting subject but not the greatest book.
My all time favorite fiction would have the be "the Count of Monte Cristo"

Hi, vitruvian12.

I was never terribly interested in the Servile Wars of Rome but then I stumbled across a miniseries called Spartacus: Blood and Sand. I rented the first season from Netflix and gobbled it up, even if the series is a bit gratuitous and overdone (part of its appeal, I suppose). I now have a couple of books about Spartacus in my Amazon wish list. LOL Just goes to show, you never know what might spark an interest.

If you're interested in Sparta I would have to recommend Donald Kagan's The Peloponnesian War. This is more or less an abstract of his peer-reviewed work on the subject that was published in several volumes, and is meant for a general audience. I recently read it for the first time. I don't know if you've already read it but I thought it was fantastic--I couldn't believe how quickly I blew through 500-plus pages. Like many scholars Kagan is a bit of an Athenian apologist but the account remains pretty balanced.

I recommend this to everyone, in fact.

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#24    lightly

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 01:57 AM

I'm not really a BIG reader  .. but  right now i'm revisiting the Complete Works of LAO TZU  
http://www.amazon.co...sl_6f4b8fq7n7_e

It's great...  a quiet break from  this , beloved,  place    !*  
Good  topic  kmt  ,honeybunchkins,  _sesh   :P

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#25    vitruvian12

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 02:17 AM

 kmt_sesh, on 11 May 2011 - 01:34 AM, said:

Hi, vitruvian12.

I was never terribly interested in the Servile Wars of Rome but then I stumbled across a miniseries called Spartacus: Blood and Sand. I rented the first season from Netflix and gobbled it up, even if the series is a bit gratuitous and overdone (part of its appeal, I suppose). I now have a couple of books about Spartacus in my Amazon wish list. LOL Just goes to show, you never know what might spark an interest.

If you're interested in Sparta I would have to recommend Donald Kagan's The Peloponnesian War. This is more or less an abstract of his peer-reviewed work on the subject that was published in several volumes, and is meant for a general audience. I recently read it for the first time. I don't know if you've already read it but I thought it was fantastic--I couldn't believe how quickly I blew through 500-plus pages. Like many scholars Kagan is a bit of an Athenian apologist but the account remains pretty balanced.

I recommend this to everyone, in fact.
Thanks for the suggestion. The book Im reading on Sparta is just starting to touch on the Peloponnesian War, although it  refers to it as the Athenian War since it is from Spartas perspective. I dont think it will be to in depth in it though.
I enjoyed the Spartacus miniseries also. The Spartacus rebellion was a bit different from the other slave rebellions I think. The others consisted of slaves but I believe they also had a large component of free men involved. These were trying to shake up the current order in hopes of getting more in the new one. And none had such a skillfull and charismatic leader.

Edited by vitruvian12, 11 May 2011 - 02:18 AM.


#26    kmt_sesh

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 01:10 AM

 vitruvian12, on 11 May 2011 - 02:17 AM, said:

Thanks for the suggestion. The book Im reading on Sparta is just starting to touch on the Peloponnesian War, although it  refers to it as the Athenian War since it is from Spartas perspective. I dont think it will be to in depth in it though.
I enjoyed the Spartacus miniseries also. The Spartacus rebellion was a bit different from the other slave rebellions I think. The others consisted of slaves but I believe they also had a large component of free men involved. These were trying to shake up the current order in hopes of getting more in the new one. And none had such a skillfull and charismatic leader.

Well, if in the course of your reading you find yourself engrossed by the Peloponnesian War (or Athenian War, if you're pro-Spartan), I doubt there are many books better than Donald Kagan's. This war lasted for almost thirty years so there's a hell of a lot of ground to cover, and Kagan does a marvelous job.

I've never read about any of the Servile Wars but I'd wager the Third Servile War was particularly vexing to Rome. It's amazing how much success Spartacus and his men had against professional Legions. All I really know is that it wasn't the cohesive and united front often portrayed in cinema because some of the leaders split off to fight their own fights. The miniseries Blood and Sand is really entertaining, even if it started out with too many shades of the film 300. Unfortunately the lead actor, Andy Whitfield, has had to back out due to serious health problems, so the future of the series is uncertain at best. They're launching the second season but it's actually going to be a prequel to the first season.

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#27    tipotep

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 01:40 AM

 kmt_sesh, on 12 May 2011 - 01:10 AM, said:

Well, if in the course of your reading you find yourself engrossed by the Peloponnesian War (or Athenian War, if you're pro-Spartan), I doubt there are many books better than Donald Kagan's. This war lasted for almost thirty years so there's a hell of a lot of ground to cover, and Kagan does a marvelous job.

I've never read about any of the Servile Wars but I'd wager the Third Servile War was particularly vexing to Rome. It's amazing how much success Spartacus and his men had against professional Legions. All I really know is that it wasn't the cohesive and united front often portrayed in cinema because some of the leaders split off to fight their own fights. The miniseries Blood and Sand is really entertaining, even if it started out with too many shades of the film 300. Unfortunately the lead actor, Andy Whitfield, has had to back out due to serious health problems, so the future of the series is uncertain at best. They're launching the second season but it's actually going to be a prequel to the first season.

I was a big fan of Spartacus also , Sesh the second series has already been aired , very good as the first series was .

I will add my list of books I am reading or have just finished ...

I have just finished Matthew Reillys Jack west Series ..

The Five Greatest Warriors .
The Six Sacred Stones .
Seven Ancient Wonders .

His stories are a little far fetched but I enjoy how he infuses history with fiction .

I am currently reading two books ..

The Complete Pyramids - Mark Lehner

How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs - Collier and Manley

Cheers Tip.


#28    vitruvian12

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:26 AM

 kmt_sesh, on 12 May 2011 - 01:10 AM, said:

Well, if in the course of your reading you find yourself engrossed by the Peloponnesian War (or Athenian War, if you're pro-Spartan), I doubt there are many books better than Donald Kagan's. This war lasted for almost thirty years so there's a hell of a lot of ground to cover, and Kagan does a marvelous job.

I've never read about any of the Servile Wars but I'd wager the Third Servile War was particularly vexing to Rome. It's amazing how much success Spartacus and his men had against professional Legions. All I really know is that it wasn't the cohesive and united front often portrayed in cinema because some of the leaders split off to fight their own fights. The miniseries Blood and Sand is really entertaining, even if it started out with too many shades of the film 300. Unfortunately the lead actor, Andy Whitfield, has had to back out due to serious health problems, so the future of the series is uncertain at best. They're launching the second season but it's actually going to be a prequel to the first season.

He did have great success against the legions, who were used to defeating foes even when out numbered due to their training and discipline.  His guerrilla tactics were hard for them to counter.


#29    kmt_sesh

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 11:09 PM

 tipotep, on 12 May 2011 - 01:40 AM, said:

I was a big fan of Spartacus also , Sesh the second series has already been aired , very good as the first series was .

I will add my list of books I am reading or have just finished ...

I have just finished Matthew Reillys Jack west Series ..

The Five Greatest Warriors .
The Six Sacred Stones .
Seven Ancient Wonders .

His stories are a little far fetched but I enjoy how he infuses history with fiction .

I am currently reading two books ..

The Complete Pyramids - Mark Lehner

How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs - Collier and Manley

Cheers Tip.

Well, I've got the second season of Blood and Sand in my Netflix queue, so maybe it won't be long until it starts appearing in my mail. I wonder what, if anything, they will do with the series next?

Ah, the venerable Collier and Manley. Anyone interested in starting to learn hieroglyphs should definitely buy How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs. It's a fun book and has useful exercises for the new student.

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#30    rashore

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 11:49 PM

Lol... I feel like my historical reading lately is boring compared to what other are reading. I've been reading some gardening history.

Early American Gardens "For Meate or Medicine" by Ann Leighton. Definitely a fascinating look into how our forefathers viewed plants and their needfullness. Kind of dry sometimes, but I like gardening, and I like old school stuff. We just moved, so I've been pouring over all my plant and critter books and a few years worth of old Organic gardening mags.
I've also been burning through Diane Mott Davidsons culinary mystery series. The local library happens to have the full set of it.





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