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The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


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#1336    Harte

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:43 PM

View Postpsyche101, on 09 December 2012 - 11:03 PM, said:

You have a history of refusing rational explanation for unfounded wild explanation with no support whatsoever. As such, my take is that you are simply deliberately flaming in an attempt to flush out any lurker that might be ignorant enough to support your ridiculous claims and notions.

Which landed him on my ignore list with nopeda.

I don't consider my time to be so valueless as to have extra time to read anything these two (and many others) post here.

Of course, I'm forced to when people quote them.  That's more than enough.

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#1337    Oniomancer

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:43 PM

View Postzoser, on 10 December 2012 - 06:20 PM, said:

OK here's one that no one has yet answered.  Despite people who think they have.  One of the skeptics claimed that the construction of megalithic precision had been witnessed by the Spanish.

The simple refutation of that is that if it were true, how come the Spanish did not describe the techniques in writing

You've already been presented with at least two direct quotes to that effect.

Quote

and replicate it in their own building work in South America and impress the world?

At the very least why did they not order the enslaved indiginous people to perpetuate the stunning feats?

Just another tiny detail that makes no sense when a little light is shined through the cracks (of the inferior building work).

Why would they? Why go to all the extra effort when regular stonework would suffice, and with far less time and work especially given their technique? However, if the stonework of Cuzco is indeed contemporaneous with the conquistadors as claimed, then they did just that.

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#1338    zoser

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:44 PM

View PostJGirl, on 10 December 2012 - 06:23 PM, said:


zoser, you just keep posing counter questions to the ones asked of you. just because you can ask a counter question doesn't mean you have answered anything.


It's important to do this for this reason; if the suggestion is that no indiginous people created these amazing feats then what then?

Archaeology and Darwinism do not account for old civilisations being replaced by those of lower development.  Then what options actually exist?  That this planet was visited at some time in the remote past, created remarkable achievements, and left.  We can hypothesise who, when and why at some later time.

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#1339    zoser

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:46 PM

View Postsynchronomy, on 10 December 2012 - 06:39 PM, said:

Maybe, just maybe, the Spanish were not impressed by the natives stonework since they would have been quite familiar with their own European standards of building complex cathedrals with huge domes, roads, bridges etc and elaborate artwork, literature, science and engineering.  When they saw the natives stacking stones using brute-force methods they probably thought it was no big deal.
If the Incas were using some advanced engineering methods that impressed the Spaniards I would think it safe to say they would have begun using it in their home country.

Unlikely; building churches does not require brute force?  The other point is that the methods were not described.  If you saw a team of people assembling Sacsayhuaman you would be amazed surely; it would be an outstanding event in world history.  Instead we are left totally in the dark.

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#1340    Oniomancer

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:47 PM

At the rate he's reading, Harte should be done by the 12th, just in time to spell doom for this thread.
Repent, sinners! The Apocalypse is nigh!

Edited by Oniomancer, 10 December 2012 - 06:48 PM.

"Apparently the Lemurians drank Schlitz." - Intrepid "Real People" reporter on finding a mysterious artifact in the depths of Mount Shasta.

#1341    zoser

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:49 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 10 December 2012 - 06:43 PM, said:

You've already been presented with at least two direct quotes to that effect.



Why would they? Why go to all the extra effort when regular stonework would suffice, and with far less time and work especially given their technique? However, if the stonework of Cuzco is indeed contemporaneous with the conquistadors as claimed, then they did just that.

You keep saying this.  The explanations make no sense.  

I disagree with your last statement.  The Spanish were saturated with Catholicism.  If they had a chance to glorify that religion with precision feats, long lasting into eternity they would have done so.

The European cathedrals have needed millions spending on them in repair bills.

The ancient walls of Cuzco, Sacsayuaman, and Ollantaytambo have needed no such repairs.

Edited by zoser, 10 December 2012 - 06:53 PM.

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#1342    S2F

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:52 PM

View Postzoser, on 10 December 2012 - 06:44 PM, said:

It's important to do this for this reason; if the suggestion is that no indiginous people created these amazing feats then what then?

Archaeology and Darwinism do not account for old civilisations being replaced by those of lower development.  Then what options actually exist?  That this planet was visited at some time in the remote past, created remarkable achievements, and left.  We can hypothesise who, when and why at some later time.

You fail to recognize the adverse effects that the Spanish involvement had on South American civilization.

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#1343    zoser

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:55 PM

View PostSlave2Fate, on 10 December 2012 - 06:52 PM, said:

You fail to recognize the adverse effects that the Spanish involvement had on South American civilization.

I know the history as well as you do STF.  The point is that if what you are saying is true the Spanish would have had a fantastic technology or technique to export to Europe.  It didn't happen.

The art of megalithic precision architecture died with the original builders.

Edited by zoser, 10 December 2012 - 06:56 PM.

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#1344    Norbert the Incredible

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:58 PM

View Postpsyche101, on 22 November 2012 - 01:28 AM, said:

One massive hole we have here, is that we also have plans.

Posted Image


Mate, that seriously is not leaving the ground. And nobody has constructed these plans that are publicly available, and I would say that is for obvious reasons. This is just not going to happen. I would love to be proven wrong, thing is we have the scripts, and as you see even drawings. Yet not one flying Vimana.

If the above could fly, I propose that it would have been done by now.

ETA But that is not to say that the Indian Scholars from this time period were not absolutely brilliant. Da Vinci also modeled flying machines that did not take of.
I've just seen this, thanks to the post above. What on earth (or not) is that supposed to be? Some kind of submarine? Whoever drew that up seems to have been a fan of jules Verne.

Edited by 747400, 10 December 2012 - 06:58 PM.

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#1345    S2F

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:04 PM

View Postzoser, on 10 December 2012 - 06:55 PM, said:

I know the history as well as you do STF.  The point is that if what you are saying is true the Spanish would have had a fantastic technology or technique to export to Europe.  It didn't happen.

The art of megalithic precision architecture died with the original builders.

The art of megalithic precision architecture, as you put it, no longer held the importance that it did before the Spanish arrived. Common sense would seem to indicate that the Spanish arrival held causation there, not some 'unknown'. I don't know, disease, war, slavery, those are the kinds of things that could interrupt civilization to a point that stoneworking took a back seat don't you think?

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

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You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#1346    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:07 PM

Cieza de Leon told that the Chachapoyas had lighter skin than other South American peoples and blond hair.

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For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#1347    Big Bad Voodoo

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:09 PM

Here is site from where Inca cut stones. I guess. Now look those lines. Wired?

Posted Image

JFK: "And we are as a people, inherently and historically, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.
For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#1348    Oniomancer

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:10 PM

View Postzoser, on 10 December 2012 - 06:49 PM, said:

You keep saying this.  The explanations make no sense.  


Go back and read Abramelin's citations.

Quote

I disagree with your last statement.  The Spanish were saturated with Catholicism.  If they had a chance to glorify that religion with precision feats, long lasting into eternity they would have done so.

You're projecting. They're an occupation force. Their first order of business after subduing the population is to establish a usable infrastructure. That requires Speed and efficiency.  Bear in mind there was nothing to keep them from replicating the style at least using their own methods, yet they didn't. Why?
The fact that stylistically, all the colonial construction in the new world emulates that of the old should also be taken into account. The Inca construction would be incompatible with that, more-so for being the products of heathens to a culture known for ruthlessly stamping such things out in favor of  assimilation to their own.

Edited by Oniomancer, 10 December 2012 - 07:10 PM.

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#1349    synchronomy

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:11 PM

View Postzoser, on 10 December 2012 - 06:55 PM, said:

I know the history as well as you do STF.  The point is that if what you are saying is true the Spanish would have had a fantastic technology or technique to export to Europe.  It didn't happen.

The art of megalithic precision architecture died with the original builders.

Thank you.  Perhaps that confirms what I just said.
The Spaniards were not impressed because they did not witness any fantastic technology or techniques:

View Postsynchronomy, on 10 December 2012 - 06:39 PM, said:

Maybe, just maybe, the Spanish were not impressed by the natives stonework since they would have been quite familiar with their own European standards of building complex cathedrals with huge domes, roads, bridges etc and elaborate artwork, literature, science and engineering. When they saw the natives stacking stones using brute-force methods they probably thought it was no big deal.
If the Incas were using some advanced engineering methods that impressed the Spaniards I would think it safe to say they would have begun using it in their home country.


At the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes--an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counterintuitive they may be, and the most ruthless skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new.
This is how deep truths are winnowed from deep nonsense. -- Carl Sagan

#1350    zoser

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:12 PM

Another smoking gun; relevant to the discussion and an expert witness.  Expert stonemason and sculptor Roger Hopkins comments on the ancient precision stonework:

Here is the title just in case it gets snipped:


Ancient-Aliens-Season-1-Episode-1-The-Evidence-Part 5




Edited by zoser, 10 December 2012 - 07:13 PM.

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