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The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


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#7966    Abramelin

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:19 PM

View Postzoser, on 02 March 2013 - 06:07 PM, said:



The shear depth of the whole block would use far too much copper.  Just like Mr O's copper tube theory.  The copper usage rate was 50 percent greater than the hole depth!  For ever 6cm of copper it used 9cm of copper.

Copper to cut granite on that scale is a non starter.

Keep trying though.

In the case of hardrocks like granite, the expense incurred by the loss of copper during the cutting process (less with bronze and iron) would restricted it to royal monuments, for usage where other tools would not suffice (Arnold 1991).


#7967    zoser

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:20 PM

View Postseeder, on 02 March 2013 - 06:17 PM, said:




sounds like a plan! Who else wants in?

Whatever you want seeder.

It doesn't change the fact that no copper tool could make that cut through abrasion.

And you all know it.



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#7968    Abramelin

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:21 PM

View Posthacktorp, on 02 March 2013 - 06:19 PM, said:

Lol...how about a sketch?

Lol, shall I send you a pair of glasses??

Oh, you mean a sketch depicting those AA working stone?


#7969    seeder

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:21 PM

View Postzoser, on 02 March 2013 - 04:23 PM, said:

And all he did was visit hundreds of sites in Peru and make people aware of what was there.



Better men than he have visited too, with much more archeo knowledge than him.... you know, professional people.  Not given to flights of fancy and letting imagination run away with themselves. Aliens needed to saw rocks indeed. Maybe the lazers run out of batteries, seeing as the pyramids were down and not giving off enough charge to replenish their lazers, they went back to doing things the hard way.

Much the way they built half of ancient Greece and Rome.

Long before

Edited by seeder, 02 March 2013 - 06:28 PM.

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#7970    zoser

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:22 PM

View Postzoser, on 02 March 2013 - 06:18 PM, said:

Any theory has to be valid.  Copper and granite does not work.

The thickness of the cut varies.

Has to be ancient high tech.

Plus read Abe's post for yourself.

It says that the copper usage rate is too high.

But then we already knew that didn't we?

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#7971    Abramelin

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:25 PM

View Postzoser, on 02 March 2013 - 06:07 PM, said:



No such blades ever found!



If that is your main argument against the result of those experiments, then I ask you to show me some AA tools.

View Postzoser, on 02 March 2013 - 06:22 PM, said:

Plus read Abe's post for yourself.

It says that the copper usage rate is too high.

But then we already knew that didn't we?

In the case of hardrocks like granite, the expense incurred by the loss of copper during the cutting process (less with bronze and iron) would restricted it to royal monuments, for usage where other tools would not suffice (Arnold 1991).


#7972    seeder

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:27 PM

"One of our successes: Denys Stocks measures the cut made over 10 days by a copper saw, just what the ancient Egyptians likely used"



Posted Image

Edited by seeder, 02 March 2013 - 06:27 PM.

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#7973    Oniomancer

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:41 PM

View Postzoser, on 02 March 2013 - 04:20 PM, said:

The debates over.

There is nothing, you, Seeder, Abe. Mr O , Dingo. Harte, LV, Myles, The Searcher, DBunker, and Uncle Tom Cobbly and all could dream up to explain that cut.

That's a cut using high technology.

It's not a natural fault; the face of the stone is far too flat all they way down.

It's granite and it's been cut deliberately.  The images even show where the cut stopped.  Nothing the Inca had or stone age tribes had could do that.

Hypothesis proved.

I'm open to explanations to the contrary but philosophy from Hazz won't work.

It's over.

With what did they cut it, dear zoser, dear zoser? Perhaps you'll recall the discussion of grit saws back when this thread was still in double digits?
You can't rule out modern intervention either. You can belittle it but you can't rule it out.

As to the flatness of natural joints...

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#7974    seeder

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:42 PM

"Petrie did not take into account that you do not need a material harder than the one you are cutting. While today we are using diamond studded saws and drill bits to work hard rock, sand used as an abrasive which gets imbedded in soft copper tools, may be less efficient, but works as well [8]. According to Denys A. Stocks when drilling or cutting hard stone, diorite, granite or the like, for every three millimetres of depth cut one should expect to lose one millimetre of the copper tool. For soft stone such as calcite or limestone the ratio is much more favourable, estimated to be greater than one hundred to one.

But not everybody is satisfied with this theory. C.Dunn [15], relying on the work done by Petrie and his own expertise as an engineer, thinks that any kind of copper is far too soft for dealing with granite (which of course it is - on its own). He proposes that

The application of ultrasonic machining is the only method that completely satisfies logic, from a technical viewpoint, and explains all noted phenomena. Ultrasonic machining is the oscillatory motion of a tool that chips away material, like a jackhammer chipping away at a piece of concrete pavement, except much faster and not as measurable in its reciprocation. The ultrasonic tool-bit, vibrating at 19,000 to 25,000 cycles per second (Hertz) has found unique application in the precision machining of odd-shaped holes in hard, brittle material such as hardened steels, carbides, ceramics and semiconductors. An abrasive slurry or paste is used to accelerate the cutting action. [4]


    Unfortunately for Dunn's theory, the only tools ever found that can be dated to the Old Kingdom, are a few copper chisels and hammerstones. So apart from the tool marks [2] left in the stone nothing factual [6] even remotely supports Dunn's theories [7]; and these marks are explained by orthodox Egyptology without recourse to energies or materials the availability of which cannot be proven. If Old Kingdom Egyptians had extraordinary tools and methods for working hard stone, this knowledge (and with it every trace of the tools or power sources) was lost during the turmoil of the First Intermediate Period, but the production of stone vessels continued well into the Roman Period, a highly unlikely scenario.

   The Egyptians went from copper to bronze and then - during the first millennium BCE - iron tools, inventing many of them by themselves. Marks left on limestone by claw chisels, which had been thought to be an invention of Greek masons working marble, were found in a 7th century tomb.


http://www.reshafim....s/stonework.htm

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#7975    third_eye

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:42 PM

I don't blame zoser for getting excited , that is an impressive cut in the stone that is , conventional saws would get stuck more often than not that deep in the stone

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#7976    seeder

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:46 PM

Posting this PDF on ancient stone-working. Im doing this to place zoser at a disadvantage as we know he doesn't read

https://docs.google....WPUBT3IQA0de2aA

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#7977    seeder

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:48 PM

View Postthird_eye, on 02 March 2013 - 06:42 PM, said:

I don't blame zoser for getting excited , that is an impressive cut in the stone that is , conventional saws would get stuck more often than not that deep in the stone

conventional saws are designed to work forwards and back, not just one way as the ancient saws. Think about it, if it pulls freely one way, but cuts the other way, how does it get stuck? All the texts advise the saws of old cut one way only.

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#7978    Abramelin

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:53 PM

View Postthird_eye, on 02 March 2013 - 06:42 PM, said:

I don't blame zoser for getting excited , that is an impressive cut in the stone that is , conventional saws would get stuck more often than not that deep in the stone

And maybe that's why the work on that stone was never finished?


#7979    third_eye

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:53 PM

View Postseeder, on 02 March 2013 - 06:48 PM, said:

conventional saws are designed to work forwards and back, not just one way as the ancient saws. Think about it, if it pulls freely one way, but cuts the other way, how does it get stuck? All the texts advise the saws of old cut one way only.

No surprise, I know a bit about saws too :tu:

Just saying that it's an impressive cut none the less

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#7980    hacktorp

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:59 PM

View Postseeder, on 02 March 2013 - 06:27 PM, said:

"One of our successes: Denys Stocks measures the cut made over 10 days by a copper saw, just what the ancient Egyptians likely used"



Posted Image

The ancient-cut channels shown in this thread are, to this day, narrower, deeper, and have parallel sides...whilst having withstood millenia of weathering.

While I applaud this man's effort, his 'channel' is a bit sad by comparison.  Good information, though, as it does tend to eliminate one of the theories of how it was actually done.

Edited by hacktorp, 02 March 2013 - 07:00 PM.