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Locating the centre of the Universe


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#76    physicsolved

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 04:17 AM

View PostStellar, on 19 January 2010 - 07:27 PM, said:

I dont see how that can express reality. What is happening in the case of my cup of tea resting on the table? The gravity pulling it down towards the center of the Earth is still there, hence in your case the contraction of space should still be happening, no?

Or how do you explain say the Sun and the Earth? They are gravitationally linked, yet the Earth is in a stable orbit. Is the space there still contracting due to gravity?

LOL! From a REAL physics standpoint "your cup of tea" ISN"T resting on the table. Its not even touching the table. Their is an atomic SPACE BETWEEN them that is not allowing your cup of tea to "really" be resting on the table. The so-called "gravity" is NOT "pulling down" anything, the space between the table and the cup is constant. When you set the glass down on the ATOMIC SPACE that only occured because SPACE CONTRACTED allowing you to do so.

How do i explain the sun and the earth: SUN= space energy. EARTH= space energy. Distance between them= space energy.


#77    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 04:18 AM

People,
This is all getting a bit heated, let's calm down.

Physicsolved:
If you want to post page after page of your "alternative hypothesis" feel free, but please do it in your own thread rather than taking someone else's off topic. Your stuff has is totally incomprehensible and really does not seem to belong in a science section. Thinking outside the box is fine but I'm not sure I can locate the box at all.

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#78    ninjadude

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 04:40 AM

View PostEmma_Acid, on 19 January 2010 - 11:15 AM, said:

Edit - I propose a new law similar to Godwin's Law. The first person to mention the myth that we used to think the earth was flat as a way of dismissing current scientific knowledge automatically loses the argument.

Emma's law. I like it. Close any thread guilty of Emma's law.

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#79    DONTEATUS

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 04:40 AM

So who Located the Center of the Universe First?

This is a Work in Progress!

#80    dazdillinjah

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 07:32 PM

I am glad we have so far agreed about the balloon analogy only as describing expansion & not the dimensions of the Universe

Now I previously considered the point of the big bang (theory) to be where the centre of the universe would be found, however I now have some further questions regarding the bbt ... OK we believe the bbt occurred 14 billion years ago

but then I was watching this nat geo vid

Ultra Deep Field

Now it says in this that the known Universe is 78 billion light years across ...now if expansion occurs at an equal rate in all directions from the 'point' it all began ...wouldnt that make the age of the Universe 39 billion years old ???

Maybe cosmic background radiation isnt an accurate marker for dating the age of the Universe or the time it all began ? ...perhaps cbr is the remnant of some mega-supernova beyond our comprehension ???


#81    sepulchrave

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 09:30 PM

View Postdazdillinjah, on 20 January 2010 - 07:32 PM, said:

Now it says in this that the known Universe is 78 billion light years across ...now if expansion occurs at an equal rate in all directions from the 'point' it all began ...wouldnt that make the age of the Universe 39 billion years old ???

Only if the expansion occurred at the speed of light. There is nothing to stop it from expanding faster than that. Indeed, the evidence seems to suggest that is the case.


#82    Emma_Acid

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 09:34 AM

View Postdazdillinjah, on 20 January 2010 - 07:32 PM, said:

I am glad we have so far agreed about the balloon analogy only as describing expansion & not the dimensions of the Universe

No-one ever suggested that the balloon surface analogy was trying to describe anything but the expansion of space.


View Postdazdillinjah, on 20 January 2010 - 07:32 PM, said:

Now I previously considered the point of the big bang (theory) to be where the centre of the universe would be found, however I now have some further questions regarding the bbt ... OK we believe the bbt occurred 14 billion years ago

I don't know how many other ways we can say this: space expanded from a single point, but this single point doesn't exist as a "centre" - the single point is the entire universe. There is no centre. I don't know how else I can say this.

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#83    Stellar

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 04:55 PM

Quote

Now it says in this that the known Universe is 78 billion light years across ...now if expansion occurs at an equal rate in all directions from the 'point' it all began ...wouldnt that make the age of the Universe 39 billion years old ???

What youre referring to is the edge of the observable universe, which means it can be much, much bigger than that aswell. If we refer to the balloon analogy again, measuring the observed universe is comparable to measuring along the circumference of the balloon. The 13.9 billion years, or .7, whichever it is, is the time it took for the balloon (universe) to expand from the single point to the way it is now.

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#84    Alien Being

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 04:57 PM

View Postdazdillinjah, on 04 January 2010 - 06:39 AM, said:

I have never been able to get an answer for this ..but worse, I keep finding information suggesting there isnt one.

As far as Im concerned that is just wrong ..imo there 'must' be a centre of the Universe, and especially if the big bang theory is to be believed.

I realise the big bang theory is 'just a theory' however if the universe did begin from a point or singularity & that scientists propose the universe is expanding due to measurements of galaxies then the expansion must be from one single position in all directions.

A further point of contention when considering a 'centre of the universe' is the use of red shift/blue shift in calculating if a galaxy is moving further away or closer toward our point of perspective ...why I say this is because everything in the Universe is moving, due to the effects of gravity & I believe that there is nothing in the universe that is at a standstill. The thing is that I believe everything orbits something (ie: our moon orbits the Earth, Earth orbits the Sun, Our Solar system orbits our galaxy etc etc) and I have never found any information regarding known orbits of galaxies which would be critical in assessing a possible centre of the universe (or point of the singularity where the big bang as theorised occurs)

As for calculations based on red/blue shift ..how can they be trusted when various stars that have been observed over time have changed from red shift to blue shift (which happens because they orbit their respective galaxies & at certain parts of their orbit would be moving away from our position but then at other parts of their orbit would be moving towards our position)

So yes ...what are your thoughts about this ? Im sure finding the point where the big bang occurred would be priceless for the science of astronomy so I hope its a thing that one day we can locate

I'm going to suggest to you that your mind is at the centre of the universe.


#85    sepulchrave

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 06:09 PM

View PostAlien Being, on 21 January 2010 - 04:57 PM, said:

I'm going to suggest to you that your mind is at the centre of the universe.
And since the large-scale universe seems pretty isotropic, that's as good an answer as any!





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