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What are the health risks of space travel?

space tourism health

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41 replies to this topic

#16    wingyflam

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:30 AM

I suspose in time it will be the norm.


#17    tyrant lizard

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:38 AM

Cabin fever must be something they considered. In space, no one can hear you when you go stir crazy


#18    ExpandMyMind

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:44 PM

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With trips in to space soon to become the norm

Umm, define 'soon'.

Edited by ExpandMyMind, 17 December 2012 - 02:44 PM.


#19    Bonecrusher

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:07 PM

View Posttyrant lizard, on 17 December 2012 - 09:38 AM, said:

Cabin fever must be something they considered. In space, no one can hear you when you go stir crazy
This is where the sensory deprivation chamber comes in handy.
If you get used to be isolated for long periods of time you could well adjust to space travel.
I can't well speak for the rest of the space travellers but it's a good starting point.
Tbh you need a whole plethora of tests to get used to the rigours of space.
As long as there's no xenomorphs in the cargo hold our intrepid spacegoers will be OK.

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#20    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:17 PM

View PostExpandMyMind, on 17 December 2012 - 02:44 PM, said:

Umm, define 'soon'.
Within the next two years in the case of Virgin Galactic.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#21    mfrmboy

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:29 PM

The cost of going up on Virgin Galactic is 200K. So I don't think the list of passengers will be a long one.

Edited by mfrmboy, 17 December 2012 - 03:30 PM.

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#22    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 04:20 PM

View Postmfrmboy, on 17 December 2012 - 03:29 PM, said:

The cost of going up on Virgin Galactic is 200K. So I don't think the list of passengers will be a long one.
Actually they are fully booked for several years, but that is not the point. When transatlantic air-travel started it was for the very rich only, but it didn't take long for the prices to be within the reach of the moderately wealth and then the ordinary person. The same could very easily happen with space tourism, especially one Virgins competitors are fully up and running.

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#23    ExpandMyMind

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:51 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 17 December 2012 - 03:17 PM, said:

Within the next two years in the case of Virgin Galactic.

Yeah I'm aware of the coming trips to space, but this is hardly them becoming the 'norm'. That phrase suggests it'll be like jumping on a flight to Australia or something. We're still quite some time away from that; from it becoming the 'norm'. Decades, probably.

Edited by ExpandMyMind, 17 December 2012 - 09:52 PM.


#24    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:10 PM

View PostExpandMyMind, on 17 December 2012 - 09:51 PM, said:



Yeah I'm aware of the coming trips to space, but this is hardly them becoming the 'norm'. That phrase suggests it'll be like jumping on a flight to Australia or something. We're still quite some time away from that; from it becoming the 'norm'. Decades, probably.
Well if you are going to pick one phrase from a long article, out of context what do you expect?

From the article:

Quote

Dr David Green, senior lecturer in human and aerospace physiology at Kings College London, predicts that in the next two years or so significant numbers of people will be taking up places on suborbital flights in a specially-designed spacecraft.

No where is it suggested that this will be "the norm", that is just your misinterpretation.

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#25    ExpandMyMind

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:31 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 17 December 2012 - 10:10 PM, said:

Well if you are going to pick one phrase from a long article, out of context what do you expect?

From the article:


No where is it suggested that this will be "the norm", that is just your misinterpretation.

Follow the link http://www.unexplain...s.php?id=239371

The sub-heading there reads: 'With trips in to space soon to become the norm, what health risks should space tourists be aware of ?'

I'm not sure who added that claim to the post but it exists, and therefore is fair game to be challenged, no?

Edited by ExpandMyMind, 17 December 2012 - 10:31 PM.


#26    AsteroidX

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:34 PM

crashing without airbags


#27    Merc14

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 11:09 PM

View PostExpandMyMind, on 17 December 2012 - 10:31 PM, said:

Follow the link http://www.unexplain...s.php?id=239371

The sub-heading there reads: 'With trips in to space soon to become the norm, what health risks should space tourists be aware of ?'

I'm not sure who added that claim to the post but it exists, and therefore is fair game to be challenged, no?

The title is completely appropriate.  In a couple of years, people going into space will be a fairly normal event in that it will happen a couple of  times a week and won't be a news event.  It is comparable to the Concorde when it arrived on the scene.  Prior to Concorde, the number of people that had traveled faster than sound was limited to the few that flew advanced military aircraft and astronauts, after Concorde that number increased exponentially and, while available to only the rich due to high ticket prices, traveling at mach speeds had become a normal event.

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#28    GreenmansGod

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 12:04 AM

Didn't they send Steven Hawking up on a short flight?  If he can handle it, then maybe...

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#29    ExpandMyMind

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 12:30 AM

View PostMerc14, on 17 December 2012 - 11:09 PM, said:

The title is completely appropriate.  In a couple of years, people going into space will be a fairly normal event in that it will happen a couple of  times a week and won't be a news event.  It is comparable to the Concorde when it arrived on the scene.  Prior to Concorde, the number of people that had traveled faster than sound was limited to the few that flew advanced military aircraft and astronauts, after Concorde that number increased exponentially and, while available to only the rich due to high ticket prices, traveling at mach speeds had become a normal event.

It'll be a fairly regular event, but this is not the same as being 'the norm'. The norm is when something becomes common and is adopted by many people.

It'll only be 'the norm' for a tiny, select group of individuals. It's a bit like saying 'having caviar everyday for breakfast is the norm';'having a servant is the norm';'being able to fly a fighter jet is the norm'.

It won't be the norm until it is commercialised to the point that almost anyone can afford to do so at some point in their life. Until then, it will still be a rare and significant event. That's how I see it.


#30    Merc14

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 01:11 AM

View PostExpandMyMind, on 18 December 2012 - 12:30 AM, said:

It'll be a fairly regular event, but this is not the same as being 'the norm'. The norm is when something becomes common and is adopted by many people.

It'll only be 'the norm' for a tiny, select group of individuals. It's a bit like saying 'having caviar everyday for breakfast is the norm';'having a servant is the norm';'being able to fly a fighter jet is the norm'.

It won't be the norm until it is commercialised to the point that almost anyone can afford to do so at some point in their life. Until then, it will still be a rare and significant event. That's how I see it.

I'd call that making space flight routine, which I agree, is decades away

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