Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * * 1 votes

Fiction Recommendations


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#16    booNyzarC

booNyzarC

    Forum Divinity

  • Closed
  • 13,536 posts
  • Joined:18 Aug 2010
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 20 February 2011 - 06:41 AM

View PostDr Strange, on 18 February 2011 - 03:46 PM, said:

--
Also, my all time favourite book ever: Richard Matheson's 'I Am Legend'.
Awesome book Dr Strange.  I'd recommend this to everyone as well.  Simply superb! :tu: None of the film adaptations have done the original book justice, not that this is uncommon for film adaptations of course.

On top of that great choice, I'd recommend just about anything by Tom Clancy or Frank Herbert.  Another of my favorite authors is R.A. Salvatore, for any who are into fantasy at all.  And if you are...  then of course you must read Tolkien.

But if I were to pick 4 of my all time favorite pieces of fiction, strangely they would be these...

The Walking Drum
Deathwatch
Tarzan of the Apes
Dune


I've read better books, but these all had a significant impact on my early appreciation for fiction in general.  Other honorable mentions, along the same line:
First Blood
Conan the Barbarian (and the many additional books/short stories)
Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser (series)
The Sword of Shannara

Crikey... I could go on forever. :hmm:

So many good books out there!


#17    The Dreamer - Hybrid89

The Dreamer - Hybrid89

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • Joined:06 Jun 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ireland

  • Its not who I am underneath, but what I do that defines me.

Posted 05 October 2011 - 10:59 AM

View Postlittlelucky, on 28 October 2010 - 04:30 PM, said:

Hey everyone!

I found a used book store on a recent trip and snagged a copy of "Girlfriend in a Coma" by Douglas Coupland.  It begins in the late 70s, and centers around a group of friends, one who has a precognition of a major disaster.  It's an easy and entertaining read.  What've you read, that you'd recommend?
I recommend 'The Last Vampire - Christopher Pike', Words cant describe how utterly fantastic it is. Its been released in an omnibus series now caleld thirst but it also continues on the story.

Enjoy

Posted Image

#18    tapirmusic

tapirmusic

    Astral Projection

  • Closed
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 643 posts
  • Joined:24 Feb 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 06 October 2011 - 11:51 PM

best fiction I've read this year:

Peter Straub - A Dark Matter

Steven Hall - The Raw Shark Texts

Philip K Dick - Valis

Philip K Dick - The Divine Invasion

Edgar Rice Burroughs - The Monster Men

Cormac McCarthy - The Road


#19    theGhost_and_theDarkness

theGhost_and_theDarkness

    Tsavo Maneater

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,914 posts
  • Joined:21 Jun 2005
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Southern Alabama

  • Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside us while we live. - Norman Cousins

Posted 07 October 2011 - 03:02 PM

View PostShadowSot, on 09 November 2010 - 07:39 PM, said:

Some of my favorite fiction is by Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman.
The book they wrote together, Good Omens is one of my favorites period.

I've always enjoyed Clive Cussler's books as well.

Jim Butcher's another one I enjoy, combing pulp detective stories and magic.

THen of course there's the classics. Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlocke Holmes for the win!

I love Neil Gaiman, and Good Omens is hilarious. I think everyone should read it. . .My favorite of his was always American Gods and Anansi Boys. . .Neverwhere is good, too. . .Eh, pretty much anything by him is awesome, I guess.  :lol:

And if you like Neil Gaiman, DEFINITELY pick up Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke. It's got the funny footnotes like Good Omens and is a very good read. Some parts are dry (for me, at least) but when it's good, it's REALLY good.

Clive Barker books are also good. I love his "children's" series Abarat, which is so awesomely strange, but not quite as mind blowingly strange as, say Imajica.

I have also heard many good things about War for the Oaks by Emma Bull, but I haven't been able to get a copy yet. It's been on my reading list forever, though.  

For a more light read in urban fantasy, I'd say Tithe; Ironside; and Valiant from Holly Black's "Modern Faerie Tale" series are just hands down the best. They may be teen books, but I think they really do well in representing urban fantasy and what it should be at a base level. As turned off by them as I was when I read what they were "about" (along with the fact that they were teen books and I'm semi ashamed of myself for even wondering into that section of the bookstore) I think they are probably some of my favorite light reads. Just complex enough to hold my attention, but not so much that I can't sit down and read one in an afternoon if I so choose.

"To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to knowledge." ~ Benjamin Disraeli

#20    Lady_Mercury

Lady_Mercury

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 311 posts
  • Joined:20 Dec 2005
  • Gender:Not Selected
  • Location:Where the dew drops cry and the cats meow

  • 'What would James Bond do?'
    'He'd probably wear a corset so no one would guess he was sixty.'

Posted 29 August 2012 - 02:17 PM

View PostJGirl, on 18 February 2011 - 04:18 PM, said:

one of the coolest books i've read in a while is clive barker's weaveworld. it's an old story, but well written and engaging.
i have over two thousand books in my library, topics ranging from gardening to life after death, and everything in between.
right now i'm into biographies - i'm thinking of tackling the queen's bio next, although it's like a million pages long!
edit to add:
anything by ray bradbury gets my vote too!

Clive Barker is awesome.  Have you read his Books of Blood?

Parts of King's 'The Shining' freaked me out: those dang topiary animals.

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time
- T.S. Eliot


#21    GoSC

GoSC

    HOSEA 1:10; 2:23

  • Member
  • 2,615 posts
  • Joined:26 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silver Mountain

Posted 29 August 2012 - 11:04 PM

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Turn Of The Screw by Henry James

The Island Of Dr Moreau by H.G. Wells

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea by Jules Verne

Conjure Wife by Fritz Leiber

1984 by George Orwell

Invasion Of The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney

Day Of The Triffids by John Wyndham

The Haunting Of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley Jackson

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

Hell House by Richard Matheson

Harvest Home by Thomas Tryon

The Other by Thomas Tryon

The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons

The Shining by Stephen King

Salems Lot by Stephen King

Cujo by Stephen King

Pet Semetary by Stephen King

IT by Stephen King

Cold Moon Over Babylon by Michael McDowell

The Elementals by Michael McDowell




Find a nice comfy seat every night to read these books and be prepared to be scared out of your wits. These novels are the scariest nailbiting reads I have ever read.

"I charge thee in the sight of God, who giveth life to all things, and of Christ Jesus, who before Pontius Pilate witnessed the good confession; that thou keep the commandment, without spot, without reproach, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ: which in its own times he shall show, WHO IS THE BLESSED AND ONLY POTENTE, KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS; who only hath immortality, dwelling in light unapproachable; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honor and power eternal. Amen" (I Tim 6:13-16).

#22    emberdawn

emberdawn

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 232 posts
  • Joined:24 Aug 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Texas

Posted 29 August 2012 - 11:06 PM

Marion Zimmer Bradley, Mercedes Lackey, C.J. Cherry, Terry Brooks, Tad Williams (Dragon bone chair) read the whole series about 5 times.       Just to name a few.  I love to read. I enjoy experiencing other people's  imagination.


#23    GoSC

GoSC

    HOSEA 1:10; 2:23

  • Member
  • 2,615 posts
  • Joined:26 Jan 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Silver Mountain

Posted 31 August 2012 - 12:00 AM

I forgot one book on my favorite lists of best horror / fantasy novels I have ever read:

Lovers Living, Lovers Dead by Richard Lortz

"I charge thee in the sight of God, who giveth life to all things, and of Christ Jesus, who before Pontius Pilate witnessed the good confession; that thou keep the commandment, without spot, without reproach, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ: which in its own times he shall show, WHO IS THE BLESSED AND ONLY POTENTE, KING OF KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS; who only hath immortality, dwelling in light unapproachable; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honor and power eternal. Amen" (I Tim 6:13-16).

#24    Wookietim

Wookietim

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 4,907 posts
  • Joined:16 Apr 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kirkland, WA

  • Search on the Android App Store for "Mothras Unexplained Mysteries" for the app I am very proud of...

Posted 07 September 2012 - 03:41 PM

Just got done with Conni Willis's "Doomsday Book" - highly recommended (As I would recommend anything by Willis).

Reading "Make Room! Make Room!" right now (People know it better by the name of the movie that was made out of it - "Soylent Green").


#25    None of the above

None of the above

    Psychic Spy

  • Closed
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,418 posts
  • Joined:20 Feb 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 07 September 2012 - 09:37 PM

Moorcock and Dick! ;)


#26    Child of Bast

Child of Bast

    Queen of the UM Asylum

  • Member
  • 5,030 posts
  • Joined:17 Jan 2008
  • Gender:Female

  • The Mad Hatter: "Have I gone mad?"
    Alice: "I'm afraid so. You're entirely bonkers.But I'll tell you a secret: all the best people are."

Posted 10 September 2012 - 08:09 PM

Lost by Gregory Maguire

'A phantom,' said my Uncle Mycroft, who had just materialised, 'is essentially a heteromorphic wave pattern that gains solidity when the apparition converts thermal energy from the surroundings to visible light. It's a fascinating process and I'm amazed no one has thought of harnessing it - a holographic TV that could operate from the heat given off by an average-size guinea pig.' ~ First Among Sequels, Jasper Fforde

#27    lizzieboo

lizzieboo

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 521 posts
  • Joined:28 May 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:2nd star on the right, straight on til morning

  • He was more like a succession of extraordinary events than a person. (Douglas Adams)

Posted 11 September 2012 - 01:01 AM

Johannes Cabal, Necromancer, by Jonathan L. Howard. It's by turns creepy, wickedly funny, and oddly affecting. (I'm presently reading the second book, Johannes Cabal, Detective, and I plan to snap up a copy of the third, Johannes Cabal: The Fear Institute when I get my next paycheck.)

Anything by Neil Gaiman, Jim Butcher, Connie Willis, Clive Barker, John Crowley...I'll add more when I think of them.

Thanks for all the great suggestions, folks...terrific thread!

All right, I see what's going on. This is the opening salvo in what will be an escalating series of juvenile tit for tat exchanges. Well titted! Stand by for my upcoming tat. --Dr. Sheldon Cooper


#28    Taun

Taun

    A dashing moose about town...

  • Member
  • 5,559 posts
  • Joined:19 May 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tornado Alley (Oklahoma)

Posted 11 September 2012 - 01:02 AM

In 1973 Dean R Koontz wrote a book called "The Haunted Earth"...  Very good book with a lot of humor and some scares as well..

The premise is that an alien race visits the Earth and in the process unlocks all of Earths myths, monsters and legends... Years after the hero of the story forms a detective agency with a hell hound and they go about doing the usual "Sam Spade" type work - cheating spouses, embezzlement, stuff like that - but with a supernatural twist - a vampire can bite you but he must first read you your rights, etc...

I really recommend this book... It's not a typical Dean Koontz book so be prepared - if you are familiar with his writing...


#29    Taun

Taun

    A dashing moose about town...

  • Member
  • 5,559 posts
  • Joined:19 May 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tornado Alley (Oklahoma)

Posted 11 September 2012 - 01:05 AM

View PostAtlantia, on 07 September 2012 - 09:37 PM, said:

Moorcock and Dick! ;)

Though this was partially in jest - both authors Micheal Moorcock and Philip Dick are excellent... I especially enjoy Moorcocks' "Eternal Hero" series - particularly "The Jewel In The Skull", and "Elric of Melnibonie (sp)"...


#30    lizzieboo

lizzieboo

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 521 posts
  • Joined:28 May 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:2nd star on the right, straight on til morning

  • He was more like a succession of extraordinary events than a person. (Douglas Adams)

Posted 11 September 2012 - 12:55 PM

View PostTaun, on 11 September 2012 - 01:02 AM, said:

In 1973 Dean R Koontz wrote a book called "The Haunted Earth"...  Very good book with a lot of humor and some scares as well..

The premise is that an alien race visits the Earth and in the process unlocks all of Earths myths, monsters and legends... Years after the hero of the story forms a detective agency with a hell hound and they go about doing the usual "Sam Spade" type work - cheating spouses, embezzlement, stuff like that - but with a supernatural twist - a vampire can bite you but he must first read you your rights, etc...

I really recommend this book... It's not a typical Dean Koontz book so be prepared - if you are familiar with his writing...

I love Koontz' "Odd Thomas" books. But right now I'm reading his 77 Shadow Street, and I am very disappointed. I'd read an excerpt from it and expected a somewhat old-fashioned ghost story with a twist related to the haunted building. It's less ghost story, more straightforward horror, and Koontz seems to be following the old Stephen King precept: "I recognize terror as the finest emotion and so I will try to terrorize the reader. But if I find that I cannot terrify, I will try to horrify, and if I find that I cannot horrify, I will go for the gross out."

That is, Koontz seems to have settled for "going for the gross out." Given how genuinely scary the Odd Thomas books can be, he must have been off his game when he wrote 77 Shadow Street.

All right, I see what's going on. This is the opening salvo in what will be an escalating series of juvenile tit for tat exchanges. Well titted! Stand by for my upcoming tat. --Dr. Sheldon Cooper





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users