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Asteroid Safety...Are we safe? [merged]

charles bolden pray asteroid

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#1    AsteroidX

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:21 PM

NASA in Congress on topic.




#2    Queen in the North

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:48 PM

Any chance of a brief summing up of what's in the video?

I can't always watch them, depending on where I am, so I find it kind of frustrating when people just post videos...

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#3    AsteroidX

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:56 PM

Basically it said we have found 1% of Earth impact Asteroids the size of the Russian one and they can hit us with 0 warning. He said it would take a 10 year window to prevent an event if we knew it was an incoming impact regardless of size basically. With current tech they believe they could deflect up to a km size Asteroid with that 10 year window.


#4    bison

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 01:00 AM

I suspect that we could manage some kind of major asteroid deflection effort in less than ten years, if we had to. Better still to not press our luck and wait for an emergency. Shouldn't we have an asteroid defense ready as soon as possible, even with no obvious threat in the offing, just in case?


#5    pallidin

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 01:39 AM

Hey AX, I believe the concern has very recently been brought-up in the US Congress.

Don't have the link, but I think it was CNN or Fox.

Anyway, surprisingly enough at least one leading Congressman expressed interested concern from, I think, NASA and JPL panelists, enough for him to advocate special funding on this issue. I guess we'll see how it goes.

I think it was an advisory commitee versus actual appropriations commitee, so who knows where it will go from here.

Edited by pallidin, 21 March 2013 - 01:46 AM.


#6    DONTEATUS

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 01:43 AM

We really do need a system in place within the next ten years ! One that Works with 99.99 % Proof .

This is a Work in Progress!

#7    csspwns

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:51 AM

Here's a realistic video of a huge asteroid impacting Earth and the results:

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#8    DieChecker

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 04:13 AM

I just was reading that the head of NASA said that "Only God could save us from an asteroid at this point", and "The only thing we could do if we knew one was coming is Pray.".

http://www.theblaze....strike-is-pray/

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#9    krypter3

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:57 AM

Considering we can only really see them when they come closer to the sun.  If one's gonna hit us, we are screwed.  Our only chance I suppose is to shoot all our nukes at it /shrugs.


#10    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:07 AM

View Postkrypter3, on 21 March 2013 - 06:57 AM, said:

Considering we can only really see them when they come closer to the sun.  If one's gonna hit us, we are screwed.

Not true.
The objects which are the most threatening are Near Earth Objects (NEOs). These are asteroids which have an orbit that crosses that of the Earth. These can be tracked and their orbits calculated. In many cases a collision could be calculated years in advance. As the recent meteor over Russia should, we still have a long way to go to locate all of the smaller objects, but the task is not impossible.

There will always be the remote chance that Earth will be hit by a comet or a rogue asteroid whose orbit we couldn't calculate in advance, but tracking NEOs will give us fair warning of the vast majority of objects which pose a threat.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#11    Frank Merton

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:28 AM

Not only that but if we are smart we will not just identify everything that could be a threat but also be ready for that comet or rogue asteroid, so that we could do something other than pray.


#12    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:40 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 21 March 2013 - 07:28 AM, said:

Not only that but if we are smart we will not just identify everything that could be a threat but also be ready for that comet or rogue asteroid, so that we could do something other than pray.

It's not about being smart. Most of the ideas currently being discussed involve deflecting a potentially harmful object into a safe orbit over a period of years. A comet or rogue asteroid simply would not give us enough warning to do that.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#13    Frank Merton

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:44 AM

I know that.  I can just see us delaying the research for economy and therefore not being smart.

The difficulty of doing something with less than a few months' warning is considerable but not unimaginable.  Considering the risk management outcome it is something that is needed.


#14    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:55 AM

View PostFrank Merton, on 21 March 2013 - 07:44 AM, said:

The difficulty of doing something with less than a few months' warning is considerable but not unimaginable.  Considering the risk management outcome it is something that is needed.
It's all very well saying "we must do something" but what? We can't perform miracles. If it is not possible it is not possible and no amount of wishful thinking will change that.

Given that these objects have only a very remote chance of hitting us the logical thing to do is to put our resources into doing something about the ones that we can predict and which present the majority of the the threat.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 21 March 2013 - 07:56 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#15    Frank Merton

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:12 AM

That is an unfortunate and I think overly pessimistic attitude: one that I sure hope the authorities don't take.  There are enough resources for dealing with both issues, although I would agree that the more likely and more easily solved scenario should get priority -- if a threatening object is found.

An object headed straight at us with little warning time would need a much more brute approach, including accepting risks that can be avoided with an object we know about decades in advance.






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