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Author sees thylacine twice


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42 replies to this topic

#31    ancient astronaut

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 02:35 AM

Make whatever claim you want, just have proof (tangible)to back it up.


#32    Domina Lucis

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 03:36 AM

View Postchopmo, on 22 April 2013 - 07:49 AM, said:

Like the Javan Rhino?

Hmm, I don't know much about the Javan Rhino actually. I might look it up when I have time.

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#33    chopmo

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 04:10 AM

View PostWatchingTheStars, on 24 April 2013 - 03:36 AM, said:

Hmm, I don't know much about the Javan Rhino actually. I might look it up when I have time.

It was a story on UM, they have found a couple after being thought to be completely extinct.
http://www.unexplain...s.php?id=240515 - That's talking about vietnams population being completely extinct but I do remember something about the indonesian population being "refound".

why is everyone so &^%$ing concerned with "the end"...
new beginnings is what you should be concerned about...

#34    kara red

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 01:51 PM

dad has a hippy theory that there a remote vally in tiland wich still has versions of all the extinct ausi animals


#35    Sundew

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 01:15 PM

View Postchopmo, on 22 April 2013 - 07:48 AM, said:


I wonder what would happen if they tried to breed with dingos, both are technically dogs (never understood the tiger reference except for maybe an ancient asain tribute considering the geographical location of the country) but one is a marsupial

That would be a biological impossibility, a placental mammal will not "breed" with a marsupial. And very likely the dingo and thylacine would be about as compatible as a cobra and a mongoose, being direct competitors.

This also shows the problem with common names. A thylacine is not a "dog". As an example, there is a big difference between a chestnut horse and a horse chestnut. This is why Linnaeus gave us the scientific binomial naming system for living things, because you might have a plant or animal with a huge natural range across multiple countries/languages and in each having a different common name; however with his system it has only one Latin (or in some cases Greek) name and so can be identified as a particular species.


#36    Sundew

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 01:21 PM

View PostDarkwind, on 21 April 2013 - 06:35 PM, said:

I hope it is true, like I hope the hearings of the Ivory Billed woodpecker in Georgia, USA are true.

Believe that was Arkansas, but in any case one can hope it still lives. It is difficult to tell from the video footage. The Ivory Bill looks similar to the Pileated (which is quite common) so could be mistaken identity. The IB is also thought to possibly be alive in Cuba as well.


#37    ReaperS_ParadoX

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 06:13 PM

interesting

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#38    Myles

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 09:27 PM

View PostR4z3rsPar4d0x, on 09 May 2013 - 06:13 PM, said:

interesting
Very very interesting


#39    DieChecker

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 08:14 PM

View Postcsspwns, on 22 April 2013 - 12:57 AM, said:

Or maybe the reason why we can't find the Sasquatch and Oreng Penk is because they aren't real :rolleyes:
I tend to believe the Orang Pendek is very similar to the gibbon sub-species known as Saimangs.

Saimang = Tailless, arboreal, black-furred, long, dense, shaggy hair, 1 m in height, and weighing up to 14 kg, long, gangling arms, face is hairless apart from a thin mustache. Native to the forests of Malaysia, Thailand, and Sumatra.

Orang Pendek = Ground-dwelling, bipedal primate that is covered in short fur and stands between 80 and 150 cm tall. Mountainous forests on the island of Sumatra. Some reports = blackish-brown, short-legged with long, powerful arms, seen in trees

Posted Image

View Postchopmo, on 24 April 2013 - 04:10 AM, said:

It was a story on UM, they have found a couple after being thought to be completely extinct.
http://www.unexplain...s.php?id=240515 - That's talking about vietnams population being completely extinct but I do remember something about the indonesian population being "refound".
Maybe you mean the Sumatran Rhinos found in Borneo?


Edited by DieChecker, 11 May 2013 - 08:19 PM.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#40    chopmo

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:11 AM

Cheers DieChecker

why is everyone so &^%$ing concerned with "the end"...
new beginnings is what you should be concerned about...

#41    Yes_Man

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 10:16 AM

View Postkara red, on 26 April 2013 - 01:51 PM, said:

dad has a hippy theory that there a remote vally in tiland wich still has versions of all the extinct ausi animals
versions? did not know animals were machines or robots. Anyway I i highly doubt that, Australia as an island was separate from the rest of the world that allowed Marsupials to grow, Thailand does not have space for giants to move around, while Australia does


#42    DieChecker

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 05:42 PM

View PostSundew, on 07 May 2013 - 01:15 PM, said:

That would be a biological impossibility, a placental mammal will not "breed" with a marsupial. And very likely the dingo and thylacine would be about as compatible as a cobra and a mongoose, being direct competitors.

This also shows the problem with common names. A thylacine is not a "dog". As an example, there is a big difference between a chestnut horse and a horse chestnut. This is why Linnaeus gave us the scientific binomial naming system for living things, because you might have a plant or animal with a huge natural range across multiple countries/languages and in each having a different common name; however with his system it has only one Latin (or in some cases Greek) name and so can be identified as a particular species.
:tsu: :tsu:

Dog = Class: Mammalia, Order: Carnivora, Family: Canidae, Genus: Canis, Species: C. lupus, Subspecies: C. l. familiaris
Thylacine = Class: Mammalia, Infraclass: Marsupialia, Order: Dasyuromorphia, Family: Thylacinidae, Genus: Thylacinus, Species: T. cynocephalus

The only thing these two animals have in common is they are Mammals

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#43    Dragon Lover 21

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 08:33 PM

I think monsterquest got everything except a photo and an actual specimen. DNA the works... I don't remember the episode that well

The world isn't black and white or even shades of grey, it's in color. Life is happy, sad, angry, exciting, boring, things change, things stay the same, and that's just how this perfectly imperfect world works.

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