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How can Space be infinite?


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#16    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 05:22 AM

For this each group of galaxies would have to have a single black hole to pull it away in a unique direction. What is more these black holes would have to magically have no attraction for each other. It doesn't matter how, or how many times you modify this, it isn't going to work.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#17    noyritus

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 05:26 AM

The subject being discussed can not be comprehended.  Maybe computer AI will advance to a point surpassing our awareness and can answer the question of space and time.  But will we understand the answer and will it even care to share it.


#18    artymoon

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 05:30 AM

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For this each group of galaxies would have to have a single black hole to pull it away in a unique direction. What is more these black holes would have to magically have no attraction for each other. It doesn't matter how, or how many times you modify this, it isn't going to work.

Thanks for your opinions. grin2.gif


#19    artymoon

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 05:34 AM

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The subject being discussed can not be comprehended.

Now you tell me! Thanks a lot. laugh.gif


#20    ThinkFurther

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:13 AM

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I was just thinking of vacuum tubes and light bulbs, and the thought occurred to me: if space is a vacuum, how can it be infinite as many have said? Would it not have to be 'contained'?
Maybe this has been discussed already, if so, I apologize. original.gif  
Any thoughts on this?


I think you can ask that, and then you could ask how could  it not be infinite. At some point we most likely have to have an infinite "layer" if you will, even if space is not. But if there were something beyond space (although it's unlikely), the laws of physics could be different there, etc. We humans just can't wrap our brains around how it can be possible, because to us it is impossible.

But then, you have no matter in space other than the solid objects like the stars and planets, etc. So if there WERE something outside it, unless the matter outside space were moved in some way, would space need containing? there is no outgoing or incoming force in space, no inertia. If something in space is at a complete halt, it can only be moved by something physically pushing it.

I dunno, it's quite worthless to ponder right now, it's just something we won't know anytime soon.

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