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Buddha


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#16    ChloeB

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:19 AM

View PostDarkwind, on 24 June 2013 - 11:44 PM, said:

As part of my Druidry I need to learn more about the Buddha.  What is a good introduction read or site?

Stephen Batchelor has a book called Buddhism without Beliefs that I liked, short, simple, nice primer into the basics of it.

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#17    GreenmansGod

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:47 AM

Thank you all so much, for your help.  Hippie flowers and peace all around. :wub:

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#18    redhen

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 02:02 AM

I'll offer one more short video, a collection of wisdom sayings of the Buddha. Some are from the sutras (canonical texts) others from the dhammapada, which are the alleged sayings of the Buddha. While not a sacred text, the dhammapada has been held in high regard for a long time.

While you won't find the core beliefs of Buddhism presented here, it does give you a taste of Buddhist attitudes.




#19    The Id3al Experience

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 02:03 AM

View PostRyu, on 25 June 2013 - 01:15 AM, said:

Thanks a heap for the link. It makes more sense but it seems odd that even among Buddhists there seems to be differing opinions.

As a sidenote I, or rather my father, had a big Buddha statue who had a happy dragon draped over his shoulders.
Thinking back I wish he hadn't given it away.
But at any rate thanks.

There are many people who think Buddhism is a religion when it is just a philosophy..Buddha, as I recall, was merely giving his views and was not demanding that others follow him or be sent to eternal torment (like some religions claim).

But like with all philosophies there are things in Buddhism I do not go along with..especially the whole "Life is suffering" bit..focusing on it so much that balance is being sacrificed right there. To me life is just life...not good, not bad...things happen that hurt us and things happen that help us and some things just leave you going "Huh?".

As meany buddhist would tell you, you cannot put something so complex is something not complex like languge, It losing its meaning for there isnt enough vocabulary to explain what its all about.

We tend to think in a very symbolic-meaning way - I see a cup - I assiocate that oject 'cup' with the word ' cup' and the definition of 'cup'. So when I see a cup that doesnt quiet look like a ;cup; I question its existence, but even its definition.

Same with Buddhism. or any spritual path I guess.

There is no ONE way, therefore there technically no ONE buddhism. Hence the variation. You get that with all regilous outfits.

Buddhism is the way of the mind, soul, body - therefore we cannot follow the 'buddhist' way as there really is only your way, which in turn is deferent to my way.

The thing one must realise is the consistancies with each religon baring the most fundermental truths of the human experience. And we all know each regilon has had human leaders, with ther interprations and people follow blindly - Buddhism isnt any different.

Edited by The Id3al Experience, 25 June 2013 - 02:06 AM.

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#20    third_eye

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 05:40 AM

View Postszentgyorgy, on 25 June 2013 - 12:37 AM, said:


The best book about "generic" Buddhism is entitled, If You See the Buddha on the Road, Kill  Him . It came out in the '80's, but I cannot recall the author.

~snip


Sheldon B Kopp ... THe Pilgrimage of Psychotherapy Patients
mine is Bantam ISBN  0-553-27832-0>>495

Its as much about Psychotherapy as it is about Buddhism / Zen

"The most important things that each man must learn no one else can teach him. Once he accepts this disappointment, he will be able to stop depending on the therapist, the guru who turns out to be just another struggling human being. "

__________________________________

I mostly recommend :

Quote

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Siddhartha
Author: Herman Hesse
Translator: Gunther Olesch, Anke Dreher, Amy Coulter, Stefan Langer and Semyon Chaichenets
Release Date: April 6, 2008 [EBook #2500]
Last updated: July 2, 2011
Last updated: January 23, 2013
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SIDDHARTHA ***
Produced by Michael Pullen, Chandra Yenco, Isaac Jones

It gives a western oriented mind the solid footing to approach the Eastern texts without the mumbo jumbo expectations of 'enlightenment'

it makes texts like :


Quote

Zen Classics:    Formative Texts in the History of Zen Buddhism

STEVEN HEINE DALE S. WRIGHT, Editors
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS



an easier path for comprehension ...

Then the ancient texts like :

Quote

The Gateless Gate ( Sacred-texts.com )
    
  The Gateless Gate or The Gateless Barrier (Chin. Wu-wen kuan; Jap. Mumonkan)
  The author is Chinese Ch'an master Wu-men Hui-hai (無門慧開 Mumon Ekai, 1183-1260).
    
  English Translation
  By late Zen master Katsuki Sekida (Two Zen Classics 26-137)

a clear pool of mirror like reflection ...


Of course there are many ... countless in fact ... just from the English publications alone ... Gary Zhukav 'The Dancing Wu Li MAsters ... [Fritjof_Capra]_The_Tao_of_Physics ... all great introductions to the basic outlook of Buddhist outlook and basic percepts ...

Then if going to the greater depths would be the sutras .... those ... is a whole entire different world ...

:lol:


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third_eye ' s cavern ~ bring own beer

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#21    Beany

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 01:39 PM

A scholarly text about the history of Buddhism might be helpful, as religion, like other social institutions, reflect societal norms & thinking. I took a class at the university I work for on the history of China, Japan, & Korea, and learned some things about Buddhism that won't be found in religious texts. I think the history of any religious institution is as informative as the dogma.


#22    kajiwara

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 06:39 PM

ive recently started learning about Buddhism im currently reading a few books by author G.K Gyatso that cover the the three main schools of buddhism and zen which im enjoying alot..also essential buddhism by Jack maguire is a good read

Edited by kajiwara, 30 June 2013 - 06:40 PM.


#23    Sherapy

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 06:47 PM

View PostDarkwind, on 24 June 2013 - 11:44 PM, said:

As part of my Druidry I need to learn more about the Buddha.  What is a good introduction read or site?


I thoroughly enjoyed this one Darkwind,  I feel this course is beautifully done, even the meditations are explored. The professor captures the essence of Buddhism in her presentation, to/for me.
http://educhoices.or...Psychology.html

Edited by Sherapy, 30 June 2013 - 07:02 PM.




#24    redhen

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 07:23 PM

View PostSherapy, on 30 June 2013 - 06:47 PM, said:

. The professor captures the essence of Buddhism in her presentation, to/for me.
http://educhoices.or...Psychology.html

Sure, you can strip out the religious and metaphysical aspects of Buddhism to make it more palatable in the West, but that's like "Christians" who strip away Jesus's teachings on the eternal fires of hell.

If all you are after is Vipassana meditation and mindfulness based stress reduction, you're just as well off taking MBSR or CBT programs.


#25    The Lone Ranger

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 08:58 PM



Life is not a continuum of pleasant choices, but of inevitable problems that call for strength, determination, and hard work  - Indian Proverb

#26    Sherapy

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 09:39 PM

View Postredhen, on 30 June 2013 - 07:23 PM, said:

Sure, you can strip out the religious and metaphysical aspects of Buddhism to make it more palatable in the West, but that's like "Christians" who strip away Jesus's teachings on the eternal fires of hell.

If all you are after is Vipassana meditation and mindfulness based stress reduction, you're just as well off taking MBSR or CBT programs.

It is a neutral approach, it won't be for everyone.




#27    redhen

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 09:55 PM

View PostSherapy, on 30 June 2013 - 09:39 PM, said:

It is a neutral approach, it won't be for everyone.

I wouldn't call it neutral, I would call it an ideological reformulation of Buddhism for the West. This may be just what the doctor ordered for some people, but I think it's important that they realize it for what it is; no going for refuge, no rebirth, no beliefs at all.


#28    Sherapy

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 10:29 PM

View Postredhen, on 30 June 2013 - 09:55 PM, said:

I wouldn't call it neutral, I would call it an ideological reformulation of Buddhism for the West. This may be just what the doctor ordered for some people, but I think it's important that they realize it for what it is; no going for refuge, no rebirth, no beliefs at all.

As I said neutral, I think from what I know of Darkwind (if he finds this sparks his interest, I have no preference in the matter.)  He will glean from it what works for him or not. Personally, I would look at many perspectives, this is just one and not the only one (to be fair to you, too.) IMO,The beauty of Buddhism is one does not need to ascribe to religious anything to find value/or not in its teachings. The same can be said for Christianity, strip away the dogma and you have the same ideas said in different ways. Do no harm basically.  Just my two cents though.

Edited by Sherapy, 30 June 2013 - 10:30 PM.




#29    No-thingBornPassion

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 10:42 PM

View PostDarkwind, on 24 June 2013 - 11:44 PM, said:

As part of my Druidry I need to learn more about the Buddha.  What is a good introduction read or site?
Hi Darkwind,

Here are some interesting links for you: http://www.luangphor.com/

http://sak-yant.com/



Have a good evening.

Edited by braveone2u, 30 June 2013 - 11:12 PM.

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