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Edward Snowden NSA whistleblower


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#31    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 01:26 PM

Really good article, and video here: http://news.yahoo.co...05856.html?vp=1



Quote

The Chill Factor: Investigative Reporter Talks US Covert Wars and National Secrets

Top Line

As the White House faces questions about secret internet and telephone surveillance programs, investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill says, “There's a chill that's been sent through the national security reporting community.”
Scahill, who investigated the United States’ covert operations in the war against terrorism in a new documentary, “Dirty Wars,” told Top Line in an interview recorded prior to the most recent NSA leaks that sources inside the government have grown fearful of talking to the media.
“Many sources that I used to be able to talk to through encrypted e-mail or with chats using OTR, off the record software, they won't do it anymore,” Scahill said. “It's either in person or nothing. … There's a real fear on the part of whistleblowers and sources that the Espionage Act is going to come knocking on their door one day under the Noble Peace Prize-winning, Constitutional law professor, Democratic president.”
In his documentary, Scahill makes the case that the Obama administration has overstepped its stated goals of “targeted killings” of terrorists in places like Yemen, Pakistan and Somalia.
Asked if he thinks the U.S. is creating more terrorists than it is killing, Scahill responded: “I think we're creating more enemies than we are killing terrorists. When I was in Yemen, people were saying, 'You consider al Qaeda terrorism. We consider the drones terrorism.'”
He told the story of investigating the United States’ first authorized attack in Yemen, which occurred in 2009.
“When I went there to investigate this cruise missile strike, multiple people had cell phone videos of the aftermath,” Scahill recalled. “And the U.S. had claimed that they had wiped out an al Qaeda camp, but their cell phone videos showed bodies of infants being pulled out of rubble, giving lie to the pronouncements that it was just an al Qaeda camp that was hit and civilians didn't die in it.”



#32    Babe Ruth

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 01:30 PM

View PostThanato, on 10 June 2013 - 10:22 PM, said:

Babe, what Manning did was just dump hundreds of thousands of misc files a few ended up being illegal while the vast majority where just classified. He didn't care what he got just that he got it. Had he just leaked the illegal stuff, such as the Apache Video or others, then my opinion would be different but based on the fact that those items just happened to be in the data dump, and not the sole reason for it, then he broke Military Law and betrayed his Oath.

What Snowden did was leak a single piece of information. About something that the Government did in secret against the laws of the land, and as I understand it, the highest law of the land in the US is the US Constitution.

The only similarities as that they leaked government information. The biggest difference is the information leaked. That information leaked is what defines these two cases. Manning deserves a maximum penalty for betraying his position in the Military. Where as Snowden leaked information that the public needed to know as the Government is taking private information and holding it in an Intelligent Service database.

~Thanato

I do understand what you're saying, and in the most general sense, your details are essentially true.

But I would say your interpretation of the details is way off base.  Manning did not release the information to the enemy (whoever on earth that might be), he released it to the public, including the people who pay his checks, the american taxpayers.

Further, while he did betray his government, he defended and greatly served his country.  In reality, a country and its government are 2 separate things.  As Thomas Paine put it, it is the responsibility of the patriot to protect his country from its government.

Manning and Snowden did precisely that.

It is a mistake to confuse a country and its government. :yes:


#33    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 01:34 PM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 11 June 2013 - 01:30 PM, said:

I do understand what you're saying, and in the most general sense, your details are essentially true.

But I would say your interpretation of the details is way off base.  Manning did not release the information to the enemy (whoever on earth that might be), he released it to the public, including the people who pay his checks, the american taxpayers.

Further, while he did betray his government, he defended and greatly served his country.  In reality, a country and its government are 2 separate things.  As Thomas Paine put it, it is the responsibility of the patriot to protect his country from its government.

Manning and Snowden did precisely that.

It is a mistake to confuse a country and its government. :yes:

I like what Jesse Ventura says. "I love my country, not my government." :tsu:


#34    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 02:23 PM

Quote

Journalist in US surveillance case: More to come

HONG KONG (AP) — The journalist who exposed classified U.S. surveillance programs leaked by an American defense contractor said Tuesday that there will be more 'significant revelations' to come from the documents.
"We are going to have a lot more significant revelations that have not yet been heard over the next several weeks and months," said Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian.
Greenwald told The Associated Press the decision was being made on when to release the next story based on the information provided by Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old employee of government contractor Booz Allen Hamilton who has been accused by U.S. Senate intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California of committing an "act of treason" that should be prosecuted.
Greenwald's reports last week exposed widespread U.S. government programs to collect telephone and Internet records.
"There are dozens of stories generated by the documents he provided, and we intend to pursue every last one of them," Greenwald said.

Taken from http://news.yahoo.co...-050921834.html


#35    Orcseeker

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 03:18 PM

View PostThanato, on 11 June 2013 - 02:11 AM, said:



But you are missing my point. With out any regard for the boots on the ground, he just gave over 500,000 files to a foreign national. He betrayed his oath, he betrayed his position, and he betrayed his nation. You can allways play the what if game after it happens, but what the man did was illegal. Yes some good came out of it, but the good should never out weigh the bad.

Snowden knew something that was under the laws of the land (the US Constitution) illegal. So he sought to bring to light information on this classified operation to spy on US Nationals.

I completely recognised your point. What I'm saying is that maybe if he did filter out those other documents we may have never seen the injustice that was exposed. Most of those classified documents are nothings anyway.


#36    Ashotep

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:20 PM

Are people like Snowden becoming the modern day Robin Hood?  Instead of robbing from the rich and giving it to the poor they are exposing governments or the rich and powerful for what they are doing secretly.


#37    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:23 PM

The petition has reached 50,000 signatures!!
Link: https://petitions.wh...nowden/Dp03vGYD

Also this:

Quote


Americans Debate: Is Edward Snowden a Hero or a Traitor?

Meanwhile in the U.S., a debate is raging as to whether Snowden should be considered a hero or a threat to the nation.

"He's a traitor," Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, told ABC News' "Good Morning America" in an exclusive interview today. "The disclosure of this information puts Americans at risk, it shows our adversaries what our capabilities are, and it's a giant violation of the law."

Boehner said he had been briefed on all of the programs revealed by Snowden's information and said that no Americans are spied on unless they're in contact with a terrorist abroad.


Greenwald called Boehner's remarks "pathetic."
"Nothing [Snowden's] disclosed in any way harms national security. Everything has been carefully vetted first by him and then by us, to make sure that there was no harm to anybody. It was only informing our fellow citizens about what it is our government is doing in the dark," he said. "We didn't reveal anything to terrorists."
But at the White House website, more than 25,000 people have signed a petition to give Snowden a blanket pardon for his alleged crimes.
There was also great praise for Snowden from another famed whistleblower, Daniel Ellsberg, who defied the Nixon administration four decades ago by leaking the Pentagon Papers about the Vietnam War.
"As for being a traitor, that's part of the price of telling the truth that the President doesn't want told," Ellsberg, now 82 years old, told ABC News. "I paid that price myself."




Taken from: http://gma.yahoo.com...topstories.html


#38    Babe Ruth

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 07:19 PM

Boehner is such an idiot, but he does show the government mindset, no doubt.


#39    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 07:21 PM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 11 June 2013 - 07:19 PM, said:

Boehner is such an idiot, but he does show the government mindset, no doubt.

Just shows that the Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats..... :no:


#40    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 08:12 PM

Quote

Both Sides Can Agree: America's Top Spy Lied About Data Mining

Public officials are rarely called liars these days, even when they lie blatantly, but the ideological odd couple of Slate's Fred Kaplan and Charles Cooke of the National Review are both using that word to call out Director of National Intelligence James Clapper for deceiving the public about the extent of the NSA's data gathering. Only Kaplan calls for Clapper's job — though others are not far behind — but the implication in both writers is clear: If you're going to be Director of National Intelligence, you should at least have a better poker face.

It all goes back to an exchange at a Senate hearing back on March 12 when Sen. Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, asked Clapper (the man charged with overseeing America's entire national security apparatus) straight up, under oath, "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Clapper said, "No sir … not wittingly."

After Edward Snowden's leak, Cooke writes, "By dint of a widespread preference for politeness, human beings tend to trip over themselves to find euphemisms for the word 'lying.'" And as Kaplan writes, "we all now know, he was lying. We also now know that Clapper knew he was lying." Even more galling, as Kaplan points out, is that this was a question that Wyden already knew the answer to and Clapper knew that Wyden knew the answer was "Yes." But he said "No" anyway, because, as Clapper explained last weekend, he wanted to give an answer that was the "least untruthful." That's a parsing of language only Bill Clinton or Stephen Colbert could love


From: http://news.yahoo.co...-185223217.html


#41    Sweetpumper

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 08:17 PM

Posted Image

"At it's most basic level, science is supposed to represent the investigation of the unexplained, not the explanation of the uninvestigated."
- Hunt for the Skinwalker

"So many people forget that the first country the Nazis invaded was their own." Dr. Abraham Erskine

#42    Kowalski

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 08:31 PM

This is too funny:

Quote

George Orwell's dystopian fiction Nineteen Eighty-Four is enjoying a renaissance. According to the lastest sales rankings published by Amazon.com, sales of the classic novel's 2003 reprint have spiked 3,100% over the past 24 hours as coverage has widened of the fresh reports (and new confusion) about the National Security Agency's data gathering programs and the 29-year-old Booz Allen Hamilton ex-employee,Edward Snowden, who leaked details about them last week. Amazon's "movers and shakers" feature, which tracks such data, changes fairly often, so we're including a screenshot of the page taken on Tuesday afternoon

From: http://www.theatlant...0-amazon/66129/

Edited by Kowalski, 11 June 2013 - 08:32 PM.


#43    Ashotep

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 12:06 AM

I've heard 1984 was a really good book.


#44    Jessica Christ

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 12:38 AM

View PostBabe Ruth, on 11 June 2013 - 01:30 PM, said:

I do understand what you're saying, and in the most general sense, your details are essentially true.

But I would say your interpretation of the details is way off base.  Manning did not release the information to the enemy (whoever on earth that might be), he released it to the public, including the people who pay his checks, the american taxpayers.

*snip*

Edward Snowden Tells South China Morning Post: U.S. Has Been Hacking Hong Kong And China Since 2009

Quote

Snowden said that according to unverified documents seen by the Post, the NSA had been hacking computers in Hong Kong and on the mainland since 2009. None of the documents revealed any information about Chinese military systems, he said ... Snowden believed there had been more than 61,000 NSA hacking operations globally, with hundreds of targets in Hong Kong and on the mainland.

http://www.huffingto..._n_3430082.html

So he runs to a country that has their internet and phone monitored? Is he planning on staying there? Are they really more free than we are?

Then he tells them our government has been spying on theirs?

And we are still claiming he did this for the American people? Unsure how raising tensions, or attempting to, between us and China is good for our people. Unsure how telling them that is not giving information to our competitors.

Snowden is a megalomaniac.

Edited by The world needs you, 13 June 2013 - 01:04 AM.


#45    Jessica Christ

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 12:43 AM

View Postspartan max2, on 10 June 2013 - 03:22 AM, said:

This guy use to make 200k and he now gives it all up to tell the truth.

This is a brave person we should all be proud of. Thank god some people still have courage

He was also only on the job for less than 3 months.

Quote

Quote

Booz Allen can confirm that Edward Snowden, 29, was an employee of our firm for less than 3 months, assigned to a team in Hawaii. Snowden, who had a salary at the rate of $122,000, was terminated June 10, 2013 for violations of the firm’s code of ethics and firm policy. News reports that this individual has claimed to have leaked classified information are shocking, and if accurate, this action represents a grave violation of the code of conduct and core values of our firm. We will work closely with our clients and authorities in their investigation of this matter.

Snowden claimed he made roughly $200,000, according to The Guardian.

Edward Snowden Fired By Booz Allen; Whistleblower Made Only $122,000

He definitely knows how to overinflate himself.





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