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Splendiferous English!


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#46    ouija ouija

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 07:00 PM

View PostEldorado, on 05 July 2012 - 04:38 PM, said:

Radio Sports Commentator:

"There was a stramash in the penalty-box, which ended in handbags-at-dawn.  Both centre-halfs saw red."

Stramash: A stramash is a chiefly Scottish word for a disturbance, a noisy racket, or a crash.


(Edit for dramatic license)
And there was me thinking it was Scottish for a cup of tea :lol:

This ..... this is your life as it passed before other people's eyes.

italics don't really work in comic sans, do they? :/                                                                                      

#47    Eldorado

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:22 AM

Carnaptious is a word often applied to those with a snappy, critical temperament, as exemplified by the following (presumably apocryphal) anecdote from a Herald article from November 2000: 'On being informed of the Labour person's brush with the carnaptious canine, Anniesland Conservative spokesperson Belinda McCammon said: "Oh dear, I hope the dog's all right".'

http://www.scotslang...icles/words/581

Edited by Eldorado, 19 July 2012 - 12:22 AM.


#48    schizoidwoman

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 08:24 AM

View PostEldorado, on 19 July 2012 - 12:22 AM, said:

Carnaptious is a word often applied to those with a snappy, critical temperament, as exemplified by the following (presumably apocryphal) anecdote from a Herald article from November 2000: 'On being informed of the Labour person's brush with the carnaptious canine, Anniesland Conservative spokesperson Belinda McCammon said: "Oh dear, I hope the dog's all right".'

http://www.scotslang...icles/words/581

Perhaps it was just rambunctious, another lovely word!


#49    Ealdwita

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 09:39 AM

View Postealdwita, on 26 June 2012 - 03:40 PM, said:

In the course of my work, I have encountered many slang words and phrases and I've been rummaging among my files for good examples. The best come from 16/17th.Cent Legal papers. Here's a few I've selected....

Frummagemmed = hanged or strangled
High Pad = highwayman
Lullypriggers = thieves who steal from washing lines
Drawer-latches = burglars
Pennyweighter = forger
Underdubber = prison guard

...and so on!

Reading back through this thread I realised I'd used a really good word without realising!

(One for the Brits)
About 700 words used in the English language originate from a Hindu or Urdu base - one them being bungalow - a single-story dwelling. Actually I contest this theory. I have it on good authority that the word originated in 1920's Wolverhampton when a local builder ran out of bricks whilst building a house. "Ah bugrit," he said, scratching his head, "Joost Bung a low roof on it!"

(Sorry, Colonials - but you have to be familiar with a Midlands accent to get that one!)

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#50    schizoidwoman

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:24 PM

View Postealdwita, on 19 July 2012 - 09:39 AM, said:

Reading back through this thread I realised I'd used a really good word without realising!

(One for the Brits)
About 700 words used in the English language originate from a Hindu or Urdu base - one them being bungalow - a single-story dwelling. Actually I contest this theory. I have it on good authority that the word originated in 1920's Wolverhampton when a local builder ran out of bricks whilst building a house. "Ah bugrit," he said, scratching his head, "Joost Bung a low roof on it!"

(Sorry, Colonials - but you have to be familiar with a Midlands accent to get that one!)

I once told my American husband this and for a few seconds he believed me, then the penny dropped...


#51    Eldorado

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:59 PM

Dunno why your post reminded me of this, Eald.. but it did and I still smile at the memory.

Can remember a school pal telling the gang he wanted his nickname to be Gerry Nimmo.  Took us 10mins to figure out he was talking about Geronimo.

p.s. We still remind him. lol

Tumshie is what we called him eventually.  Tumshie = turnip (cos his name is Turner and he is indeed, a turnip).

Edited by Eldorado, 19 July 2012 - 01:03 PM.


#52    EllJay

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:25 PM

Serendipity

- means a "happy accident" or "pleasant surprise"; specifically, the accident of finding something good or useful without looking for it. The word has been voted one of the ten English words hardest to translate in June 2004 by a British translation company.

The first noted use of "serendipity" in the English language was by Horace Walpole (1717–1797). In a letter to Horace Mann (dated 28 January 1754) he said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip, whose heroes "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of".

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#53    schizoidwoman

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 08:24 PM

View PostEllJay, on 21 July 2012 - 10:25 PM, said:

Serendipity

- means a "happy accident" or "pleasant surprise"; specifically, the accident of finding something good or useful without looking for it. The word has been voted one of the ten English words hardest to translate in June 2004 by a British translation company.

The first noted use of "serendipity" in the English language was by Horace Walpole (17171797). In a letter to Horace Mann (dated 28 January 1754) he said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip, whose heroes "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of".

On a related note, serendipitous is also a very pleasing word.

On an unrelated note, I'm currently enjoying some tiffin (another good word).

Edited by schizoidwoman, 22 July 2012 - 08:25 PM.


#54    Michelle

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 08:34 PM

View PostEllJay, on 21 July 2012 - 10:25 PM, said:

Serendipity

- means a "happy accident" or "pleasant surprise"; specifically, the accident of finding something good or useful without looking for it. The word has been voted one of the ten English words hardest to translate in June 2004 by a British translation company.

The first noted use of "serendipity" in the English language was by Horace Walpole (1717–1797). In a letter to Horace Mann (dated 28 January 1754) he said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip, whose heroes "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of".

One of my favorite all time words. :tu:

When we are on road trips, and take a wrong turn, we usually always find something interesting which makes it serendipitous.


#55    Ealdwita

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 11:41 AM

View Postschizoidwoman, on 22 July 2012 - 08:24 PM, said:

On an unrelated note, I'm currently enjoying some tiffin (another good word).

'Tiffin' is an Anglo/Indian word derived the now obsolete English 'tiffing' meaning - to sip. We use the word in Nepal to describe a snack or packed lunch.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#56    schizoidwoman

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 11:44 AM

View Postealdwita, on 23 July 2012 - 11:41 AM, said:



'Tiffin' is an Anglo/Indian word derived the now obsolete English 'tiffing' meaning - to sip. We use the word in Nepal to describe a snack or packed lunch.

As, indeed, do I. Though I'm not in Nepal.


#57    Ealdwita

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 02:23 PM

View Postschizoidwoman, on 23 July 2012 - 11:44 AM, said:

As, indeed, do I. Though I'm not in Nepal.

I return to Nepal on 26th.September. Elope with me and we can take tiffin together in the foothills of the Annapurnas!

Posted Image

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#58    schizoidwoman

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 03:07 PM

View Postealdwita, on 23 July 2012 - 02:23 PM, said:



I return to Nepal on 26th.September. Elope with me and we can take tiffin together in the foothills of the Annapurnas!

Posted Image

Cheeky!


#59    Ealdwita

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 03:50 PM

View Postschizoidwoman, on 23 July 2012 - 03:07 PM, said:

Cheeky!

Gramercy madam, assign no cogitations to the risible jocularity of a superannuated wiseacre such as I. T'was spoken in jest alone.

"Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnáwan þín gefá!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".
I can teach you with a quip, if I've a mind; I can trick you into learning with a laugh; Oh, winnow all my folly and you'll find, A grain or two of truth among the chaff!
(The Yeoman of the Guard ~ Gilbert and Sullivan)

#60    Eldorado

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:31 AM

I heard this just yesterday.

"Have you been plunking the school?"

Plunk is a term of uncertain origin, though it may possibly have some connection with Dutch plenken, to play truant. It is first recorded in John Jamieson’s Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language (1808), the muckle tome that set the benchmark for historical dictionaries for centuries to come. In 1905 the Argyllshire Herald contained the poetic lines "Twas there we hid oor books an slates when we did plunk the schule", and another rather genteel example occurs in Anna Blair’s novel of bygone Glasgow, More Tea at Miss Cranston’s (1991): "The only time I plunked the school was to see Earl Haig going along Great Western Road".
http://www.scotslang...icles/words/928



Apologies it's not standard English, but I find it splendiferous and it's my thread, kinda.  :)





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