Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * * 1 votes

Have Cryptozoology ever done anything useful?


  • Please log in to reply
101 replies to this topic

Poll: Have Cryptozoology ever done anything useful? (59 member(s) have cast votes)

Are cryptozoologists relevent?

  1. Yes, very much so! (19 votes [32.20%])

    Percentage of vote: 32.20%

  2. Naaaw, they ain't done sh!t (22 votes [37.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 37.29%

  3. Without them we'd forget all those cryptids out there! (15 votes [25.42%])

    Percentage of vote: 25.42%

  4. A crypto-who?? (3 votes [5.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.08%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#91    Night Walker

Night Walker

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,048 posts
  • Joined:23 Oct 2009
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Where women glow and men plunder

  • We're all storytellers. We all live in a network of stories. There isn't a stronger connection between people than storytelling.

    J.M. Smith

Posted 05 November 2012 - 10:10 PM

View PostMyles, on 05 November 2012 - 05:47 PM, said:

I'm with you on this, but does this mean that a scientist looking for and finding a new snail has been practicing cryptozoology?  Most scientists will not like that.

Sure - there is definitely much academic mistrust of Cryptozoology and that many scientests/naturalist who are doing their job (ie documenting new species) simply do not like to be associated with Cryptozoology at all. Why the stigma? The Monster Hunters. They also consider what they do to be cryptozoology. So even though we can try to define it in acceptable terms for the purposes of this discussion, cryptozoology, by its broader appeal and like many of the more its fantastic ("legendary") subjects, remains difficult to pin down and properly define. Cryptozoology, by its very nature, is a blurry subject and that such ambiguity is more a function of the characters it attracts rather than the creatures they claim to seek.

Personally, I prefer the Monster Hunting side of cryptozoology because it is more sensational and, lets face it, wacky. I don't really care if a new species of snail is found (unless it is a Mongolian Death Snail or something) but I do acknowledge the importance of diverse academics attempting who are at least attempting to legitimise the study of Cryptozoology but that is a difficult thing because of the appeal and ambiguity of the broader subject.

The academics who do explore this murky side of cryptozoology are often seduced and seemingly blinded by it - which is worth studying in itself - and often then become part of the ambiguity process. Look at Valentin Sapunov - he is much more of an enigma than his elusive/illusive quarry. Fascinating stuff...

Posted Image Yes! Canada's most fearsome predator. The Kodiak Marmoset – it's the world's largest smallest primate. "My God! He's killing us..."

The Yowie-ocalypse is upon us...

#92    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 17,212 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:56 AM

I think the issue with Cryptozoology's definition needs another angle. To me it seems that cryptozoology is Obviously a science. It is simply being practiced in the main, by untrained individuals. Just as at one time, biology, ecology and geology were practiced by untrained individuals. Audobon had little training, yet is remarked as being a great ornitologist.

I think that Bobo practicing cryptozoology is the same as some kid with a 6 inch telescope practicing astronomy from his back yard. Science is the process of following the subject. The subject is science regardless of how many people are out there practicing it poorly. Perhaps we should adopt the term used in various other sources on various other sciences? Namely using the term Amateur. Amateur indicates it is basically a hobby, as in amateur astronomer, amateur geologist, amateur archeologist.... Almost all cryptozoologists would then fit under Amateur Cryptozoologist, because there is no formal education for cryptozoology. Alternately, I'd put forward that those with degrees in biology, zoology, natural science and such could be termed cryptozoologists if they made that their main subject of study. These would/should be the only people considered to be expert. Just because you've run into a bigfoot shouldn't make you an expert.

I think cryptozoology is the study and search of hidden/mysterious creatures (including mysterious humans). And not about studying non-existent things. Non-existent things is a much greater catagory and while many of the objects of interest of cryptozoology might fall into non-existent things. That does not mean cryptozoology equals non-existent things. That is like saying that because astronomers study Mars, and Mars is a planet, that the only thing astronomers study is planets. The example is kind of backwards, but the point remains that cryptozoology is pointed at a specific sub-set of creatures that may or may not exist.

One thing about todays cryptozoology is that due to improved communications and travel technologies, we've already found most of the large animals that are going to be found, and thus the number of animals that CAN fall under the heading of cryptozoology has been greatly reduced in the last century. But I do think there may be some creatures still out there waiting to be cataloged.

Edited by DieChecker, 06 November 2012 - 01:57 AM.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#93    Myles

Myles

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 4,104 posts
  • Joined:08 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 November 2012 - 12:45 PM

I like the use of amateur crytozoologist.    That makes more sense.


#94    Myles

Myles

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 4,104 posts
  • Joined:08 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:24 PM

Is it cryptozoology when scientists study the spade-toothed whale?    This whale has never been seen alive.   Only a couple of bones have been found over the last hundred and fifty years.  However, in 2010 two of them beached themselves in New Zealand.  Scientists only got to them after they were burried and already decomposed.  Before 2010, with only a couple bones (a partial jaw in 1878 and a piece of scull in the 1950's) was this a cryptid?


#95    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 17,212 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:30 PM

View PostMyles, on 06 November 2012 - 01:24 PM, said:

Is it cryptozoology when scientists study the spade-toothed whale? This whale has never been seen alive.   Only a couple of bones have been found over the last hundred and fifty years.  However, in 2010 two of them beached themselves in New Zealand.  Scientists only got to them after they were burried and already decomposed.  Before 2010, with only a couple bones (a partial jaw in 1878 and a piece of scull in the 1950's) was this a cryptid?
It might be cryptozoology when Bubba the Sailorman head out in his fishing trawler to find and film this whale. Since he would be looking for a "hidden animal". Much like those out looking for loose kangaroos in Indiana, or Big Cats in the UK and Australia.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#96    Myles

Myles

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 4,104 posts
  • Joined:08 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 November 2012 - 09:59 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 06 November 2012 - 08:30 PM, said:

It might be cryptozoology when Bubba the Sailorman head out in his fishing trawler to find and film this whale. Since he would be looking for a "hidden animal". Much like those out looking for loose kangaroos in Indiana, or Big Cats in the UK and Australia.

I see what you mean.   I don't think real scientists think of what they do as cryptozoology, therefore I don't either.


#97    Thegreatsilence

Thegreatsilence

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 108 posts
  • Joined:28 Apr 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Batcave

Posted 31 March 2013 - 08:35 AM

How can you find something or taken seriously when wildlife officials are even reluctant to admit there are cougars occurring in some eastern states of U.S ? Cougars are not even cryptids per se. Dicoveries have been made those last years, but most oftenly only  micro-critters that are not so worthy  of interest to the eyes of the general public whereas there's still a plenty of room for a big critter to exist. Do those scientists really  fear  the ridicule ?  I don't think  this is a proper answer.


#98    Rafterman

Rafterman

    Majestic 12 Operative

  • Member
  • 6,387 posts
  • Joined:27 Sep 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Upstate

Posted 31 March 2013 - 01:27 PM

I think BFRO did one of those adopt a highway things a few years back, but they had to stop because Bobo kept scaring the passers by.

"You can't have freedom of religion without having freedom from the religious beliefs of other people."

#99    QuiteContrary

QuiteContrary

    BugWhisperer

  • Member
  • 4,651 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Tejas

  • "I'm an optimistic, don't know." Onslow

Posted 31 March 2013 - 04:54 PM

View PostRafterman, on 31 March 2013 - 01:27 PM, said:

I think BFRO did one of those adopt a highway things a few years back, but they had to stop because Bobo kept scaring the passers by.

Ah, bigfoot sightings were reported along that section of road too.
(Bobo is the sasquatch stand-in and all)

Keep your eyes wide open and don't run!

P.S. Just to be clear, because sometimes I am not. I do not believe...
in the existence of a large previously unknown undiscovered hairy biped roaming North America.
But I like to hear the accounts, read the books, watch the shows, discuss and argue about the phenomenon.

#100    CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

    Paranormal Investigator

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 766 posts
  • Joined:27 Feb 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Annwyn

  • Without going out of my door
    I can know all things of earth
    Without looking out of my window
    I could know the ways of heaven

Posted 31 March 2013 - 09:23 PM

Wasn't the giant squid a crypto myth at one time ?  :unsure2:


#101    QuiteContrary

QuiteContrary

    BugWhisperer

  • Member
  • 4,651 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Tejas

  • "I'm an optimistic, don't know." Onslow

Posted 31 March 2013 - 09:48 PM

View PostCRIPTIC CHAMELEON, on 31 March 2013 - 09:23 PM, said:

Wasn't the giant squid a crypto myth at one time ?  :unsure2:

That depends on your definition of a cryptid.

Keep your eyes wide open and don't run!

P.S. Just to be clear, because sometimes I am not. I do not believe...
in the existence of a large previously unknown undiscovered hairy biped roaming North America.
But I like to hear the accounts, read the books, watch the shows, discuss and argue about the phenomenon.

#102    Godofcats

Godofcats

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 541 posts
  • Joined:26 Aug 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio

Posted 01 April 2013 - 04:45 AM

I feel there is two sides of this kind of stuff. If one actually gets into this stuff they would find that there are some very smart and serious cryptozoologist. But there are the hunters that basicly just go out for the thrill of it and to try to see a cryptid. This is what you see on Finding Bigfoot. The same goes for parapsychology and ufology. There are really smart serious ones and the hunters that everyone sees on tv.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users