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#76    markdohle

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 06:18 PM

View PostRon Jeremy, on 12 July 2013 - 10:54 PM, said:

I gotta be honest with you.

I am beginning to realize that I really don't belong here. There are too many people whom I can't agree with at best. There are quite a few who are totally out there( to put it nicely) and many of the people in here are completely stuck in mystical and supernatural perspective, which I can't stand.

There's a very personal and private reason why I became so hostile and hateful to mysticism and supernatural views. And I don't think I can really make others understand my situation.

Actually there is not need to, why does it matter, we are all trying to make our way through life, hopefully the best way we can.

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#77    J. K.

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 02:18 PM

View Postambelamba, on 26 June 2013 - 09:39 PM, said:

I am still struggling to break free from the shackle of Christianity. I am going through a lot of difficulties these days and the idea of this Abrahamic deity tortures my mind. I have trouble breaking free from the thought of a monotheistic deity influencing my life.

...

You know, I simply want to live a good life and pursue whatever spirituality I want to study. I am very interested in Buddhism and Taoism, and they are very incompatible with monotheistic Abrahamic worldview. The only thing that holds me back from freely pursuing my spiritual quest is my excruciating hardship.

I'm still not understanding why you're having difficulty.  How is it that the belief stays with you when you have chosen to reject it?  What is the excruciating hardship that holds you back from following the Eastern religions?

One's reality is another's nightmare.

#78    ambelamba

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 01:35 AM

I do have a form of OCD. And I was officially diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome today. The combination of two is devastating if you are raised in highly-dogmatic and religious environment.

People like me, although rare, should be raised in a kind of environment that rejects supernatural and metaphysical concepts to stay sane. The by-the-book and hyper-analytical mentality can be devastating if you are injected with supernatural religious dogma.

I am a victim. And the religious authorities don't think much of my kind of people because...we are a very rare breed.

They came with a Bible and their religion. stole our land, crushed our spirit, and now they tell us we should be thankful to the Lord for being saved.

-Chief Pontiac (1718-1769)

#79    DeWitz

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 02:31 PM

View Postambelamba, on 10 September 2013 - 01:35 AM, said:

I do have a form of OCD. And I was officially diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome today. The combination of two is devastating if you are raised in highly-dogmatic and religious environment.

People like me, although rare, should be raised in a kind of environment that rejects supernatural and metaphysical concepts to stay sane. The by-the-book and hyper-analytical mentality can be devastating if you are injected with supernatural religious dogma.

I am a victim. And the religious authorities don't think much of my kind of people because...we are a very rare breed.

Thanks for sharing this personal information. My opinion is that everybody has a diagnosis, but not many bother to find theirs' out. I commend you on your honesty and integrity.

My own situation is that I have a diagnosis of bi-polar disorder, which is equally feared and misunderstood as your 'labels.' Unchecked my ailment leads to a lot of impatience, anger outbursts and frustration which "feels" proportionate to my interpretation of a situation, but others see as overreaction or lack of self-control. Medication helps somewhat but is no cure-all.

You have my empathy and support in standing for your opinions and right to have--and express--them. Take care.

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#80    Kaa-Tzik

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 03:20 PM

View Postambelamba, on 10 September 2013 - 01:35 AM, said:

I do have a form of OCD. And I was officially diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome today. The combination of two is devastating if you are raised in highly-dogmatic and religious environment.

People like me, although rare, should be raised in a kind of environment that rejects supernatural and metaphysical concepts to stay sane. The by-the-book and hyper-analytical mentality can be devastating if you are injected with supernatural religious dogma.

I am a victim. And the religious authorities don't think much of my kind of people because...we are a very rare breed.
I have to say that looking at some religious practices carried out by some from all three Abrahamic faiths, then you are not alone in having OCD, for if twiddling beads, rocking back and forth etc is not some form of OCD then what is.

And to those whose blood pressure will rise at this, yes I do know that other religions have their strange religious nevous ticks and twitches and constant repetitions. And I know they will all say it is an aid to meditation etc, but to me it looks suspiciously like OCD

Edited by Kaa-Tzik, 10 September 2013 - 03:24 PM.


#81    ambelamba

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 03:20 PM

View Postszentgyorgy, on 10 September 2013 - 02:31 PM, said:

Thanks for sharing this personal information. My opinion is that everybody has a diagnosis, but not many bother to find theirs' out. I commend you on your honesty and integrity.

My own situation is that I have a diagnosis of bi-polar disorder, which is equally feared and misunderstood as your 'labels.' Unchecked my ailment leads to a lot of impatience, anger outbursts and frustration which "feels" proportionate to my interpretation of a situation, but others see as overreaction or lack of self-control. Medication helps somewhat but is no cure-all.

You have my empathy and support in standing for your opinions and right to have--and express--them. Take care.

Like I said I happen to be an extremely by-the-book person who cannot tolerate deviant behaviors.

When I started to see God as a being who created us sorely for his entertainment, I was enraged partly because of my psychological makeup. I guess you can figure the rest of things out.

They came with a Bible and their religion. stole our land, crushed our spirit, and now they tell us we should be thankful to the Lord for being saved.

-Chief Pontiac (1718-1769)

#82    J. K.

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 01:05 PM

View Postambelamba, on 10 September 2013 - 01:35 AM, said:

I do have a form of OCD. And I was officially diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome today. The combination of two is devastating if you are raised in highly-dogmatic and religious environment.

People like me, although rare, should be raised in a kind of environment that rejects supernatural and metaphysical concepts to stay sane. The by-the-book and hyper-analytical mentality can be devastating if you are injected with supernatural religious dogma.

I am a victim. And the religious authorities don't think much of my kind of people because...we are a very rare breed.

You have my sympathy.  Aperger's is quite challenging to live with.  However, I did find that knowledge of the condition made it easier to understand certain life situations.

One's reality is another's nightmare.

#83    Avallaine

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 02:00 AM

View PostJ. K., on 05 September 2013 - 02:18 PM, said:

I'm still not understanding why you're having difficulty.  How is it that the belief stays with you when you have chosen to reject it?  What is the excruciating hardship that holds you back from following the Eastern religions?

I'd like to expand on that, if I may...I do not, as far as I know, have OCD or Aspergers, and my family was not even all that dogmatic about our religion (Catholicism), but I had a lot of difficulty breaking with my religious training, too.  It's because religions or philosophies with a heavy component of dogma are designed to be difficult to break from.  That's the point of dogma; to set certain ideas apart from being questioned or doubted.  In its benign form, dogma is merely a set of definitions that allows belief systems to be categorized: if you believe X, Y, and Z, you are a member of this religion; if you accept X and Y but reject Z, you are a member of some other group over there.  You can't accurately call yourself a member of the "XYZ" religion unless you believe all three; making X, Y, and Z the defining dogmas of that particular faith.

But the more malignant form of dogma is a kind of aversion therapy designed to control a person's thoughts from crossing certain lines.  The extremist approach is to convince a person (often a child) that X, Y, and Z are so very, fundamentally true that only someone who believes them utterly has any chance of being a good and decent human being, or of experiencing divine mercy (without which a horrible fate awaits, described in great and gory detail).  In fact, it's often implied that those who do not believe X, Y, and Z are not merely mistaken, but egregiously wrong--mentally, emotionally, and morally flawed in so extreme a way that they might almost be considered subhuman.  If you begin to doubt X, Y, and Z, it's a warning sign that you're in great and profound danger of becoming one of them.  In some cases, it's implied that death would be preferable.

After a lifetime of hearing these things, you become well-trained; when your thoughts stray toward certain forbidden ideas, you are filled with pure terror in a way almost reminiscent of post-hypnotic suggestion.

As I said, my family wasn't even all that dogmatic compared to a lot of other Catholics; but I still remember when, in seventh grade English class, as we were reading Greek Mythology, my faith wavered.  Walking home from school, the thought occurred to me: "You know, the Greeks and Romans believed in all their gods as much as we believe in God and Jesus...what makes us more right than them?"  

Suddenly, a kind of blind dread came over me, an unreasoning panic, along with a terrified realization: this was what "temptation" was, and I had almost fallen for it, badly.  I was about to commit the ultimate thought-crime: to truly blaspheme.  I had sinned in my heart and God (of course) knew and saw.

I wrenched my mind away, truly terrified, mentally pleading for God to forgive me for almost doubting Him.  Part of me wondered why such a simple thought could be considered so wrong...but I was certain that part of me was just my "bad" side, my sinful nature, doing what it did best: try to lure me away from being good out of its own weak and petty instincts.  I had to fight it; indeed, it was my sacred and moral duty to fight it.  And so I did.  I whipped myself back into "moral" shape and it was a good year or two before I dared think seriously about such things again.


So you see, it's no easy thing to leave a lifetime of such mental habits behind, especially if it began when you were a child.  Remember, it was the Jesuits who said: "Give me the child for seven years and I will give you the man."





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