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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#2116    Van Gorp

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:35 PM

Intermezzo ...


"Foddik" as the lamp.

The 'vod' (rag) can be used to make the lamp burning, using oil.

In vodden lopen, is walking in tatters -> lompen, in brokken (loose parts).
Lomperik, voddeman, brokkepiloot: loosers  

Back to the foddik lamp (hanging loose ;-) which is kept burning like the Olielamp-ich flame :-)


#2117    Abramelin

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:39 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 04 December 2012 - 09:35 PM, said:

Intermezzo ...


"Foddik" as the lamp.

The 'vod' (rag) can be used to make the lamp burning, using oil.

In vodden lopen, is walking in tatters -> lompen, in brokken (loose parts).
Lomperik, voddeman, brokkepiloot: loosers  

Back to the foddik lamp (hanging loose ;-) which is kept burning like the Olielamp-ich flame :-)

"Vod", plural "vodden" : rag/rags. A piece of rag used as wick. Hmmm, nice find.


Otharus once posted a Greek word similar to 'foddik':

http://www.unexplain...10#entry3893017

He also posted a Dutch source for the word 'foddik' to which I replied with a screenshot of the relevant page from that book:

http://www.unexplain...30#entry3898790


#2118    TheHangedMan

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:41 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 05 December 2012 - 03:47 AM, said:

Anyway, even if the Germans call the OLB "Himmler's Bible", that hardly explains why we all here are still busy  finding out how much of it is true, could be true or simply fabricated and so on. They do not have that much influence on the investigations.

We can not even freely discuss it here...

Q.E.D.


#2119    Abramelin

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:55 AM

View PostTheHangedMan, on 05 December 2012 - 08:41 AM, said:

We can not even freely discuss it here...

Q.E.D.

You can discuss about just anything here.

But Saru warned us to take it easy with those Nazi-ish emblems and avatars, but it appears to me you and Otharus have some sort of need to use these avatars, which eventually resulted in what I expected to follow:  a convenient excuse to quit the discussion.

We can make our point very clear using words only, most of the times.

But now (both of) you have finally 'proven' your point: the OLB is truely being suppressed.

It's a nice tactic alright, but not the smartest one.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 05 December 2012 - 10:07 AM.


#2120    Abramelin

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:26 PM

We have discussed the name "Finda" ad infinitum, like that is has a an etymological connection with 'fiend", or with "to find", with "Phindi" (Hindi), and so on. Even with "Sindi/Sinda" (one of the names the Rom or Gypsies called themselves in medieval times)

The etymological connection with "Fins" may sound logical, but the way the OLB portrays these Finda doesn't make it an obvious connection. Well, to me it doesn't: they appear to be more 'Mongolic" or "Altaic" (in appearance) or Middle Eastern (by their religion).

But there is another source the creators() of the OLB could have gotten that name from, and that is Adam von Bremen.

Here it is why:

In Northern Mists (Volume 1 of 2), by Fridtjof Nansen / 1911

Adam relates much about these people, their customs, religion, and so forth:

[iv. 24.] “Between Nordmannia and Sueonia dwell the Wermelani and Finnédi (or ‘Finvedi’) and others, who are now all Christians and belong to the church at Skara. In the borderland of the Sueones or Nordmanni on the north live the Scritefini, who are said to outrun the wild beasts in their running. Their greatest town [‘civitas,’ properly community] is Halsingland, to which Stenphi was first sent as bishop by the archbishop.... He converted many of the same people by his preaching.” Helsingland was inhabited by Helsingers, who were certainly Germanic Scandinavians and not Skridfinns; but Adam seems to have thought that all the people of northern Sueonia or Suedia (he has both forms) belonged to the latter race.


http://www.gutenberg...3-h/40633-h.htm

"Finnédi or Finvedi", the -i- being the Latin ending of a plural noun. Now change that into an -a- , OLB style, and you'll get:

Finnéda or Finveda......and that's a short step to "Finnda" or "Finda".


#2121    Abramelin

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:39 PM

This thread started with the book by Alewyn, and in his book he suggests ALDLAND/ ATLAND could have been the Faroer islands at the time it was much larger.

Alewyn described geological processes by which it could have been destroyed, leaving only the present archipelago.

Yes, it may have been a much larger area of land, but hardly habitable when it was larger because that must have been during the last Ice Age, the Faroer being land covered in an ice sheet, or bordering it.

Did Frisians live in the Faroer? Yes, they did, and as pirates at its southern tip. But that was during the middle ages (around the 12th century CE, Akraberg).


OK, here's something new (I think), and again from Adam von Bremen:

Frisian expedition to the North Pole

[iv. 39.] “Archbishop Adalbert, of blessed memory, likewise told us that in his predecessor’s days certain noblemen from Friesland, intending to plough the sea, set sail northwards, because people say there that due north of the mouth of the river Wirraha [Weser] no land is to be met with, but only an infinite ocean. They joined together to investigate this curious thing, and left the Frisian coast with cheerful song. Then they left Dania on one side, Britain on the other, and reached the Orkneys. When they had left these behind on the left, and had Nordmannia on the right, they reached after a long voyage the frozen Iceland. Ploughing the seas from this land towards the extreme axis of the north, after seeing behind them all the islands already mentioned, and confiding their lives and their boldness to Almighty God and the holy preacher Willehad, they suddenly glided into the misty darkness of the stiffened ocean, which can scarcely be penetrated by the eye. And behold! the stream of the unstable sea there ran back into one of its secret sources, drawing at a fearful speed the unhappy seamen, who had already given up hope and only thought of death, into that profound chaos (this is said to be the gulf of the abyss) in which it is said that all the back-currents of the sea, which seem to abate, are sucked up and vomited forth again, which latter is usually called flood-tide. While they were then calling upon God’s mercy, that He might receive their souls, this backward-running stream of the sea caught some of their fellows’ ships, but the rest were shot [Pg 196]out by the issuing current far beyond the others. When they had thus by God’s help been delivered from the imminent danger, which had been before their very eyes, they saved themselves upon the waves by rowing with all their strength.

[iv. 40.] “And being now past the danger of darkness and the region of cold they landed unexpectedly upon an island, which was fortified like a town, with cliffs all about it. They landed there to see the place, and found people who at midday hid themselves in underground caves; before the doors of these lay an immense quantity of golden vessels and metal of the sort which is regarded by mortals as rare and precious; when therefore they had taken as much of the treasures as they could lift, the rowers hastened gladly back to their ships. Then suddenly they saw people of marvellous height coming behind them, whom we call Cyclopes, and before them ran dogs which surpassed the usual size of these animals. One of the men was caught, as these rushed forward, and in an instant he was torn to pieces before their eyes; but the rest were taken up into the ships and escaped the danger, although, as they related, the giants followed them with cries nearly into deep sea. With such a fate pursuing them, the Frisians came to Bremen, where they told the most reverend Alebrand everything in order as it happened, and made offerings to the gentle Christ and his preacher Willehad for their safe return.”


http://www.gutenberg...3-h/40633-h.htm


#2122    Abramelin

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:22 PM

I feel like the last of the Mohicans here.

Alewyn gone, Puzzler gone, Knul gone, Otharus gone, his alter ego "HangedMan" (or girlfriend) also gone, Van Gorp showing up only once a week gone....

This thread started on June 22, 2010, and it had many thousands of posts.

I don't want to be the one having to bury it.


#2123    Abramelin

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:09 PM

Adam von Bremen lived in the second half of the 11th century:
http://en.wikipedia..../Adam_of_Bremen

He talks about the Frisians sailing to the North Pole and mentions their contemporary, the reverend Alebrand, to whom they told about their adventures after they returned.:
http://de.wikipedia....rand_von_Bremen

So the Frisians are said to have reached... what? Greenland? America?... in the middle of the eleventh century.

http://en.wikipedia....lehad_of_Bremen

The Zeno brothers lived in the 14th century: http://en.wikipedia....i/Zeno_brothers

Their story about those mythical islands, like Frieslant Island, is said to be a fabrication (based on the Faroer), but could Adam von Bremen have been their source?

And did the Frisians reach the Americas in the 11th century CE??

Niccolò Zeno.
The voyages of the Venetian brothers, Nicolò & Antonio Zeno, to the northern seas in the XIVth century : comprising the latest known accounts of the lost colony of Greenland and of the Northmen in America before Columbus


http://archive.org/d...netia00zenorich

Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum - Adam von Bremen
http://archive.org/d...urgen00adamuoft


Tschan, F.J. (ed.) Adam of Bremen: History of the Archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen (New York 1959)

http://books.google....epage&q&f=false


An Eleventh-Century Frisian Voyage to
Labrador: Possibilities and Probabilities
Donald D Hogarth
University of Ottawa, Canada, 2011


Scholars have largely dismissed Adam of Bremen’s account of an eleventh
century Frisian voyage to “the northwest” due to elements of the story
characterized as too mythological or obscure to be worthy of study. This
article attempts to bring some clarity to the opposing views, highlighting
what might be a “possible” interpretation of this problematic voyage.

[..]

Summary of the northwest voyage of the Frisians: possible
sequence and events

Sometime about 1040 ce, a group of East Frisians, led by several noblemen, left
the mouth of the Weser River, sailed west to England, turned north to the Orkneys,
probably passed or landed at the Faroes, then landed on Iceland. From here, the
story becomes less definite, due to a complete lack of place names. However, the
route around Greenland — across Davis Strait to the Cumberland Peninsula of Baffin
Island and into Frobisher Bay, skirting the coast of southern Labrador — follows
a well traveled Viking trail. Off Cumberland Sound they would have encountered
icebergs, in Frobisher Bay, fog and giant tides, and off Resolution Island, fierce tidal
currents. Then, finally, they landed on Castle Island in Chateâu Bay, Labrador, where
a skirmish with Viking treasure guards took place. The Frisians made off with some
of this treasure and, in order to be absolved of piracy back home, invented a tale of
treasure-hoarding Cyclopes and their giant vicious dogs. Part of their treasure was
given to the Church in memory of their patron saint, Willehad. The voyage may have
been motivated as a raid of retribution under the guise of a journey of exploration or
a missionary venture.


http://docserver.ing...DFC0F0057DCCFF7


This Hogarth thinks the Frisians raided the raiders, aka the Vikings.


But like I posted on Februari this year, Martinus Hamconius claimed the Frisians even sailed to the silver mines in Mexico, also in the 11th century:

[xxxiv] See Martinus Hamconius, writing before 1620, who claims that Netherlanders reached the mines of Mexico and settled Chile in Charles Van den Bergh, “Nederlands Aanspraak" ("Dutch Claim"), op.cit., pp.30-33.

http://www.unexplain...15#entry4218689

So the "Inka" story in the OLB has a basis, be it some 3000 years too late...

.

Edited by Abramelin, 06 December 2012 - 12:12 PM.


#2124    Abramelin

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:17 PM

From another old post:


"However, I found where he describes how the Frisians may have reached Mexico (silver mines) and Chile (settled a colony there), but I can't understand all of it:

IMAGE: http://www.unexplain...attach_id=64125

Mind you, this is supposed to have happened several centuries before Columbus.

And that I got from the South American source I have posted about (a book that used Hamconius as one of its sources).

From what I remember this should have happened somewhere around the 10th or 11th century.

Not much help for the OLB, but in itself - if true - quite stunning."


http://www.unexplain...90#entry4252346

.

Edited by Abramelin, 06 December 2012 - 12:19 PM.


#2125    Abramelin

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:46 PM

EL DESCUBRIMIENTO DE CHILE POR LOS FRISIOS

THE DISCOVERY OF CHILE by the Frisians

http://www.aforteano...os en chile.htm

Google translation:

http://translate.goo...0en%20chile.htm

I do know the translation sucks, but I have translated more than enough for this thread.

--

El descubrimiento de Chile por los frisios en el siglo XI - José Toribio Medina/1910

The discovery of Chile by the Frisians in the 11th century

http://books.google....id=hNWkQAAACAAJ

.

Edited by Abramelin, 06 December 2012 - 03:55 PM.


#2126    Van Gorp

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:05 PM

If the above will be one of the last posts, it's a nice one.
Chile, Chil, Kil, Kelt, Fris, ...: cool link :-)

It has been very interesting for me too, thnx for all the info sharing by everyone.

With these cold winterdays, I was reading a bit by the fire about one of our Middleage classics: Van Maerlant's work 'Spiegel historiael' (13th CE).
As a salute to OLB and it's 'papekappe' reference, the first source (in my knowing) also combining the 2 words paep and cap.
Allthough it is more 'paep' (pope) and 'scap' (ship), pointing to the clergy in general (priesterschap, priestshood).

"
Ende oec mede hebbic vaer
Dat des dat paepscap belgen soude
Of ic mi dies onderwinden woude
Ende anderwaerven hebbic gewesen
In haer begripen van desen
Want ic leeken weten dede
Uter byblen die heimelichede.
"

Translation:

"
And I have also the fear,
That the ‘priesthood’ (clergy) would be irritated,
If I would dare to undertake this,
In sortlike circumstances
I have experienced allready their torn about it.
Because of what I dared to handle as a layman
About biblic and heavenly subjects.
"


#2127    TheHangedMan

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:04 PM

View PostVan Gorp, on 08 December 2012 - 08:05 PM, said:

And I have also the fear,
That the ‘priesthood’ (clergy) would be irritated,
If I would dare to undertake this,
In sortlike circumstances
I have experienced allready their torn about it.
Because of what I dared to handle as a layman
About biblic and heavenly subjects.

:D


#2128    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 05:51 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 05 December 2012 - 08:26 PM, said:

We have discussed the name "Finda" ad infinitum, like that is has a an etymological connection with 'fiend", or with "to find", with "Phindi" (Hindi), and so on. Even with "Sindi/Sinda" (one of the names the Rom or Gypsies called themselves in medieval times)

The etymological connection with "Fins" may sound logical, but the way the OLB portrays these Finda doesn't make it an obvious connection. Well, to me it doesn't: they appear to be more 'Mongolic" or "Altaic" (in appearance) or Middle Eastern (by their religion).

But there is another source the creators() of the OLB could have gotten that name from, and that is Adam von Bremen.

Here it is why:

In Northern Mists (Volume 1 of 2), by Fridtjof Nansen / 1911

Adam relates much about these people, their customs, religion, and so forth:

[iv. 24.] “Between Nordmannia and Sueonia dwell the Wermelani and Finnédi (or ‘Finvedi’) and others, who are now all Christians and belong to the church at Skara. In the borderland of the Sueones or Nordmanni on the north live the Scritefini, who are said to outrun the wild beasts in their running. Their greatest town [‘civitas,’ properly community] is Halsingland, to which Stenphi was first sent as bishop by the archbishop.... He converted many of the same people by his preaching.” Helsingland was inhabited by Helsingers, who were certainly Germanic Scandinavians and not Skridfinns; but Adam seems to have thought that all the people of northern Sueonia or Suedia (he has both forms) belonged to the latter race.


http://www.gutenberg...3-h/40633-h.htm

"Finnédi or Finvedi", the -i- being the Latin ending of a plural noun. Now change that into an -a- , OLB style, and you'll get:

Finnéda or Finveda......and that's a short step to "Finnda" or "Finda".

View PostAbramelin, on 05 December 2012 - 10:22 PM, said:

I feel like the last of the Mohicans here.

Alewyn gone, Puzzler gone, Knul gone, Otharus gone, his alter ego "HangedMan" (or girlfriend) also gone, Van Gorp showing up only once a week gone....

This thread started on June 22, 2010, and it had many thousands of posts.

I don't want to be the one having to bury it.
I'm here Abe lol.
Just been busy with some other stuff but have not forgotten or buried my favourite thread of all time. I'm onto your Finda post, yeah, there's no connection with the name of the Finns even in the OLD, unless Finda's name also means fine or finery, rather than find. I keep thinking the da at the end of words is a seperate word that means 'the' even though this doesn't fit in with how we say it or wrte it as far as I know, we might not know or realise that once, 'the' came after many words, I came across this with Wralda as well, now Finda could maybe be Fin-da = the finest. Maybe it was originally said more like 'fine there' - 'finest there' = the finest but the context is still finest there Fin-da in words like that. Might sound stupid but it seems to fit a regular etymology pattern imo that I've noticed.

Finvedi reminds me also of Veneti, the people who have a connection to the similar area, the mouth of the Vistula, maybe to Finland, bringing amber to Italy as part of the amber trade route.

Edited by The Puzzler, 09 December 2012 - 05:58 AM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2129    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 06:26 AM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 04 December 2012 - 08:31 AM, said:

Ok maybe Byzantine from Bursztyn was a bit far out , but it looked pretty close to me , i have read Byzantine is a modern word attatched to this part of history , what does it mean then ? and when and why was it given ??

I doubt many people have burnt Amber lately, i  wondered if when it burned it gave off only a cool heat , most of the myths refer to a flame or a light that did not burn , but was pure , or could purify , ......if it was not hot it could be the flame people or babies were passed through .... the fire of Molock

re the Gyanta....... that was what i was saying someone may have read old texts about Britain that were refering to amber ,and miss-translated the word as giants , and from there the myth grew and stuck............... if you say something often enough it becomes the truth ! where have i heard that before ?


re the doorkeeper ... i guess i do not understand your sense of humour yet !
Byzantine is said to be named after King Byzas, he was a son of Poseidon, an interesting connection though.

I also think amber was used in the lamps and since amber also represented the Sun, the burning lamp could also be a symbol of the Sun.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#2130    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 06:53 AM

dik seems more original to me than dayak.

dik simply means to dig and when you dig you produce a bulwark or rampart, or later it became a strong wall, or stronghold such as the name of Gadir. (OLB - Kadik)

This is also a dike.

In Old Frisian dig mean diligent and dicht equates to report or draft so these words are not related, the only one is dik - for dig, which imo retains the original meaning of what the etymology really represents - the digging up of the ground to create a fort or rampart, such as is seen all over ancient England (Maiden castle) and other places. Also includes canal building and ditches.

I do not see how this word with such an original meaning in Frisian/Nordic could be a Hebrew import quite frankly.

Edited by The Puzzler, 09 December 2012 - 07:13 AM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...




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