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Pantodragonís world in a nutshell.


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#1    pantodragon

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 02:27 PM

In a nutshell: to the best of my understanding we live in a virtual world created for us by beings whose function is to do just that, just as our function is to live in the world.  The relationship is symbiotic and one to one, one human existing in symbiosis with one ‘Quew’.

There is no physical reality, but what does exist are ‘souls’, ‘spirits’, and thoughts (and possibly other things too; I’m not really clear on this as yet).  Such a world is not ordered according to laws and mathematics as the ‘physical’ world is supposed to be, but is ordered in a manner more consistent with its make-up: it is ordered according to ‘meaning’; ie it has more in common with stories, with art and fiction than with science.

To put it another way: the world of our experience is the ‘manifestation’ of our thoughts and those of the Quew.

In order to maintain this existence there is constant, uninterrupted communication between humans and Quews.  This is largely through dreams.  The dreams one experiences in one’s sleep are communications from the Quew, while the dreams produced by one’s own mind are sent TO the Quew.  But these dreams are happening all the time, day and night; it is just that one is not normally conscious of them.

Communication can also occur through the external world.  When I say that life is a virtual reality, I could equally accurately say that it is a DREAM.  It then makes sense when I say that all of life, every aspect of our existence, is interpretable like a dream, and so communication can take place by virtually any means one can think of, including interpreting the events of one’s life, or by using tarot or oracle cards, by interpreting signs and portents, even by using ouija boards --- anything will do.

There is no such thing as ‘death’ in the sense of complete extinction.  The soul and spirit are eternal.  ‘Death’ occurs when people are no longer capable, for one reason or another, of maintaining life.  Then one is reborn, giving one a fresh start.  People should be capable of immortality, but it requires excellent health and a well-developed mind.  That we become ill and age is because we are not capable of sustaining life.  This situation need not continue.

The ‘story’ of one’s life is determined by one’s dreams and ambitions.  These are communicated to the Quew whose job it then is to arrange our lives for us in such a way as to lead to the fulfilment of those dreams.  That life currently falls short of this ideal is for the same reason as we currently die.

This gives a VERY brief account of how I understand the world.  It is intended as nothing more than to let anyone who is interested (and some have asked) know where I am coming from.

Inevitably, whenever I give such an account of myself I get challenged to ‘prove’ what I ‘claim’.  This attitude comes from the world of science and philosophy and is out of kilter with the ‘meaningful’ world I have described, but to explain why this is so would require me to go much too far into the details, would require me to write a sizable volume --- actually, there is a sizable volume in the pipeline.  Actually, I hope it will not be ‘a sizable’ volume; getting the whole thing down to manageable proportions and into everyday language is what I aspire to.

However, I can give some account of how I work, of my method.

I adopt a position of ‘extreme naivety’.  This means that I rely on the assumption that ‘Nature’ did not play some nasty trick on me by endowing me with ‘senses’ that would ‘lie’ to me.  I assume that Nature did its best for me, that it endowed me with all that I need in order to understand and live successfully in the world.

(This is diametrically opposed to Descartes, who adopted a position of extreme doubt and scepticism and ended up at the position of being able to accept nothing but his own existence --- not very practical.)

‘Extreme naivety’ means that I trust my senses.  So the grounds for my ‘beliefs’ are the evidence of my own senses.  (I also trust other people, barring outright lies.  So, if someone told me they had a tiger in their garden, and even if I went to that garden and could see no tiger and yet the other person maintained that the tiger was there, I would believe them.  Virtual reality allows for this sort of thing because the ‘truth’ lies below the surface.)

I have not worked in any systematic way nor according to any rules.  Indeed, when I set out I had no idea where I would end up.  To get an idea of the mind-set, and the ‘philosophy’ in so far as it goes, you might look to the past, or to Eastern traditions: the Cook Islanders, when setting out to cross vast tracts of water without any means of navigation, would not say that they were ‘going to another island’, but that ‘the island would come to them’.  In many Eastern religions, Buddhism, Hinduism etc you will find statements like this: when the pupil is ready the teacher appears.  Similarly, I wait and things come to me.

One might then query thus: so you, pantodragon, have developed a view of the world that is peculiar to yourself, and that requires that you call all the religions, not to mention ‘science’, a lie, and the scientific method false.  This sounds very like you consider yourself to be the only sane person in an insane world.  Surely that is not a tenable position.  

That thought did cause me a lot of trouble at the beginning.  However, I was ‘exploring’, and I found a path, and I followed it and in the end I began to see that it was leading me to a place from where I could understand far more than science could ever do.  It is a place where everything in the world makes sense.  There is not a thing I cannot understand, and that includes science and why it has ‘happened’ and what it means.  That is not to say that I have got it all under my belt as yet, at least, not in detail --- it is a rather big job, but I have got the basic overview and much besides.

I could put it this way: I have discovered the fabled ‘Aleph’, the singular point from which the whole world can be seen, present and past.

The rest of the ‘evidence’ is, as this world view itself is, rather personal, and concerns health and expectations and abilities and dreams and such.  I can say, for example, that I have cured autism, and schizophrenia and depression and paranoia and lots of other mental illnesses and lots of physical illnesses besides, but why should you believe me?  Do I even WANT you to believe me?  Actually, no I don’t.  It is more important that you have faith in YOURSELF than that you have faith in me, or anyone else, for that matter.

But that does not mean that it is not ‘healthy’ to air one’s beliefs and to discuss them and argue over them.  For one thing, beliefs can evolve and change --- and I have no problem with that --- but they will not do so if you seal yourself in a hermetic bubble.

I place little importance on belief because I place it instead on ‘ability’.  One’s mind need not, and should not, ever stop developing, and as one’s senses become better developed and the abilities involved in thinking and understanding become more advanced, one’s view of the world becomes more accurate – this is rather like being an eternal child.  One does not expect a young child to have a very accurate understanding of the world (one even tolerates and encourages a belief in Santa Claus), but one expects that it will develop as the child grows.

So, again, the importance of these forums, as I see it, is in the argument and discussion, not in the conversion to other beliefs.  Even the one-liner attacks and counter-attacks are good.  That is rather like a mental form of martial arts: you may have noticed, for example, that a ‘move’ I favour is to ‘roll with the punches’, ie, to agree with the attack and then turn it around in some way.  Another thing I will often do is ‘withdraw from enemy territory’.  Every good general knows that you don’t allow yourself to be drawn onto enemy territory!


PS  For those who may not yet have encountered this idea:

Even in modern science it is accepted that we ‘experience’ a virtual reality.  When I ‘see’ an object, what happens is that an image of the object forms on the retina of my eye, the information is then coded in an electrical signal which is sent to the brain.  The brain then uses that electrical signal to RECONSTRUCT the experience of seeing.  In other words, the brain acts like a virtual reality generator which uses the information sent from all our senses to construct a VIRTUAL world, and it is this virtual world that we experience.  If you could take a person’s brain out of the body and sustain it alive in a jar, and if you were to connect wires up to the nerve ends and send the appropriate signals down the nerve ends and into the brain, the brain would construct a virtual reality for you, and you would be unable to tell that you were not experiencing the ‘real’ world.  Does the ‘real’ world exist?


#2    Beany

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 02:51 PM

Thanks for the post, PantoDragon, it's helped me understand better some of your previous posts. Some of your basic premises are true for me, as well. The bit about nature, about beliefs vs abilities constantly evolving, and like you, I know I'm going somewhere, but I don't know where. My current practice is to pay attention, observe, putting aside my preconceptions as much as that is possible, with the idea that perhaps I'll become more aware of what's actually around me. I've been thinking a lot about subjective & objective reality, and right now tend to think there is an objective reality that is obscured or overlaid by our own subjective experiences. I'm wondering if or how my view will change if I can exchange the subjective for the objective. After all, there's no reason why objective reality should be any less miraculous than the subjective.


#3    Rlyeh

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 04:06 PM

We all have our delusions.


#4    ealdwita

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 04:49 PM

"In A Nutshell"...What a wonderfully appropriate title for this thread!

"Gśū a wyrd swa hio scel, ac gecnŠwan ĢŪn gefŠ!": "Fate goes ever as she shall, but know thine enemy!".

"I was born with a priceless gift - the ability to laugh at other peoples' troubles" - Dame Edna Everage

#5    Beany

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 05:10 PM

View PostRlyeh, on 13 April 2013 - 04:06 PM, said:

We all have our delusions.

Yeah, we do. It seems totally unfair that other people's delusions are way more obvious than ours.


#6    krypter3

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 09:22 PM

I know you're out there.  I can feel you now.  I know that you're afraid.  You're afraid of us.  You're afraid of change.  I don't know the future.  I didn't come here to tell you how this is going to end. I cam here to tell you how it's going to begin.  I'm going to hang up this phone, and then I'm going to show these people what you don't want them to see.  I'm going to show them a world without you.  A world without rules and controls, without borders or boundaries; a world where anything is possible.  Where we go from there is a choice I leave to you.


#7    Wyrdlight

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 09:27 PM

A mans fate is a mans fate and life is but an illusion.


#8    pantodragon

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 03:16 PM

View Postkrypter3, on 13 April 2013 - 09:22 PM, said:

I know you're out there.  I can feel you now.  I know that you're afraid.  You're afraid of us.  You're afraid of change.  I don't know the future.  I didn't come here to tell you how this is going to end. I cam here to tell you how it's going to begin.  I'm going to hang up this phone, and then I'm going to show these people what you don't want them to see.  I'm going to show them a world without you.  A world without rules and controls, without borders or boundaries; a world where anything is possible.  Where we go from there is a choice I leave to you.

I wish you'd unload Matrix because it's WAY wide of the mark!  Having said which, upon reconsidering the quote, particularly the last 2 sentences, I'm off to get a copy of the film.


#9    pantodragon

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 03:29 PM

View Postealdwita, on 13 April 2013 - 04:49 PM, said:

"In A Nutshell"...What a wonderfully appropriate title for this thread!

Before you make any cracks about nutshells (though I notice your nut is well shelled, though a little medieval, if I may say so): have you seen the size of volume David Hume wrote, and he only covered a fraction of the territory I'm covering?  And even when he produced an abridged version, in response to a lack of interest, it was still a mightily impressive doorstop.

PS: Are you any relation to Acorn the Dwarf who favoured similar headgear?





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