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English is a Scandinavian Language

english scandinavian language

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42 replies to this topic

#31    Abramelin

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:18 PM

View PostAtentutankh-pasheri, on 04 December 2012 - 07:51 PM, said:

and i still have problems with there and their, were and where and witch wich is which. madness, madness.......

I noticed many here have, even if they are British or American.

"There" > Dutch : Daar
"Their"  > Dutch : van hun, hun
"Were" > Dutch : waren
"Where" > Dutch : waar
"Witch" > Dutch: heks
"Which" > Dutch: welk


But we here have the same problems:

Dutch: bank > English: (1) bank / (2) couch
Dutch: niet > English: (1) not (2) staple, clamp
Dutch: net > English: (1) just, just so (2) nicely, beautifully (3) tidy, fine (4) net, web, mesh

And so on.


#32    Tutankhaten-pasheri

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:56 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 04 December 2012 - 08:18 PM, said:

Dutch: niet > English: (1) not
Which is one of those words that show  European languages had one origin. нет (nyet) no. молоко (moloko) milk is another good example


#33    CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:05 PM

View PostAtentutankh-pasheri, on 04 December 2012 - 07:51 PM, said:

and i still have problems with there and their, were and where and witch wich is which. madness, madness.......
Think of these two words like this.  There = its way over there.   Their = They can't make up their minds   You forgot they're which is the one I still get mucked up with at times. lol


#34    TheLastLazyGun

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 06:28 PM

English is a Scandinavian language?

This doesn't surprise me too much, because Old English (Anglo-Saxon) is almost identical to modern Icelandic.

Here is a poem by Egill Skallagrímsson in modern Icelandic, Old English and modern English

Modern Icelandic:

Það mælti mín móðir
að mér skyldi kaupa
fley og fagrar árar,
fara á brott með víkingum,
standa upp í stafni,
stýra dýrum knerri,
halda svo til hafnar,
höggva mann og annan.


Old English:

Þæt mælede mín módor
þæt me scolde ceapian
flæge and fægra ára,
faran aweg wið wícingum,
standan úppe in stefnan,
stíeran deorne cnear,
faran swá tó hæfene,
héawan man and óðer.


Modern English:

Thus counselled my mother
For me should they purchase
A galley and good oars
To go forth a-roving.
So may I high-standing,
A noble barque steering,
Hold course for the haven,
Hew down many foemen.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun, 05 December 2012 - 06:35 PM.


#35    Clobhair-cean

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:48 AM

This poem isn't a great example, as most of its words are related to sailing, an area where the Old Norse influence of Old English was particularly strong.

Also, Old Norse and Old English are not that far from each other from the get-go and Icelandic is basically Old Norse with a words for television and helicopter.


#36    TheLastLazyGun

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:08 PM

View PostClobhair-cean, on 06 December 2012 - 12:48 AM, said:

This poem isn't a great example, as most of its words are related to sailing, an area where the Old Norse influence of Old English was particularly strong.

Old English is definitely very similar to modern Icelandic.

Here's a poem in Old English and modern Icelandic that is NOT about sailing - the Lord's Prayer:

Old English

Fæder úre, þú þe eart on heofonum,
sí þín nama gehálgod, tóbecume þín ríce,
geweorþe þín willa on eorþan swá swá on heofonum.
Úrne gedæghwámlícan hláf syle ús tó dæg
and forgyf ús úre gyltas swá swá wé forgyfaþ úrum gyltendum
and ne gelæd þú ús on costunge ac álýs ús of ýfele.


Modern Icelandic

faðir vor þú sem ert á himnum
sé þitt nafn helgað til komi þitt ríki
verði þinn vilji á jörðu svo svo á himnum
vorn daglegan hleif sel oss í dag
og fyrirgef oss vorar skuldir svo svo vér fyrirgefum vorum skuldunautum
og né leið þú oss í freistniheldur leys oss af illu


(Mostly) modern English

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed by thy Name.
thy kingdom come, thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun, 06 December 2012 - 03:10 PM.


#37    PersonFromPorlock

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:18 AM

Yes, "Ee, ba goom!" is often heard in Minnesota....


#38    Abramelin

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:59 AM

View PostTheLastLazyGun, on 06 December 2012 - 03:08 PM, said:

Old English is definitely very similar to modern Icelandic.

Here's a poem in Old English and modern Icelandic that is NOT about sailing - the Lord's Prayer:

Old English

Fæder úre, þú þe eart on heofonum,
sí þín nama gehálgod, tóbecume þín ríce,
geweorþe þín willa on eorþan swá swá on heofonum.
Úrne gedæghwámlícan hláf syle ús tó dæg
and forgyf ús úre gyltas swá swá wé forgyfaþ úrum gyltendum
and ne gelæd þú ús on costunge ac álýs ús of ýfele.


Modern Icelandic

faðir vor þú sem ert á himnum
sé þitt nafn helgað til komi þitt ríki
verði þinn vilji á jörðu svo svo á himnum
vorn daglegan hleif sel oss í dag
og fyrirgef oss vorar skuldir svo svo vér fyrirgefum vorum skuldunautum
og né leið þú oss í freistniheldur leys oss af illu


(Mostly) modern English

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed by thy Name.
thy kingdom come, thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.

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#39    Cybele

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 02:15 AM

English is a Western Germanic language; Scandinavian languages are North Germanic. I assume this similarity is mostly reflected in similar grammatical structure. Obviously a lot of our modern vocabulary is Latin in origin. I believe this was due to the Norman (French) Conquest in medieval times. However, anyone who's learned a romance language can tell you that English is not very similar to French, Italian, Spanish, etc. in terms of verb conjugation and tenses (with English being much simpler) or even in terms of word order--in English adjectives come before the nouns they describe; in Spanish, it is the opposite.

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#40    Mike D boy

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 02:26 AM

Some linguists felt English is half-Romance due to the origin of a large percentage of words came from French, a descendant language of old Latin of the Roman empire, noting the Roman colony presence of pre Anglo-Saxon England (Britannica). The English language should have a Celtic component from the Britons whom lived there before the Romans arrived, but the language wasn't much influenced by Celtic after the long period of Roman and the final conquest by Angles, Saxons and Jutes from Northern Germany with adjoining Denmark as places of origin.

And the first ancestral peoples of Britain and Ireland - the Picts are thought by some geneticists to be ethnolinguistic cousins of the Basques, there has been study on the genetic origins of the Irish to have a 90-95% common genetic link with the Basques and pre-Roman Iberians in Spain and Portugal as well with France (the Basque country in southwest parts of the country), but too little remains of the Pictish language.

The English we speak should contains any immemorial words traced to any language previously spoken in the British isles and for Scandinavian linguist influence to be detected in English should shown Danish origins of the Jutes from the Jylland peninsula of Denmark. The Jutes actually share more language commonalities with the Dutch and Frisians whom live farther north in the Netherlands and northwest Germany, so the English language should belong to the Nederlandic instead of German (Low) and Scandinavian-Danish realm of linguistics.

Edited by Tsa-La-Gie Oyate, 07 December 2012 - 02:32 AM.

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#41    spud the mackem

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:02 AM

View PostAtentutankh-pasheri, on 04 December 2012 - 07:51 PM, said:

and i still have problems with there and their, were and where and witch wich is which. madness, madness.......
   I guess it would be a good idea to buy an Oxford English Dictionary,they are not too expensive.cheers.

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#42    spud the mackem

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:29 AM

View PostCRIPTIC CHAMELEON, on 04 December 2012 - 09:05 PM, said:

Think of these two words like this.  There = its way over there.   Their = They can't make up their minds   You forgot they're which is the one I still get mucked up with at times. lol
  They're is differerent from there/their, as they're means "they are" ,same as we're (we are)...you're  (you are) etc. no offence meant.

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#43    Tutankhaten-pasheri

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 06:14 PM

Perhaps a bit offtop, but still about English. Can it be explained were US Southern accent comes from, why is it so distinctive that non English native speakers can clearly hear a difference. And by the way, it is a wonderful accent





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