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Are Chupacabras Troodons?


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#31    orangepeaceful79

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 04:42 PM

View PostJeff Albertson, on 15 December 2012 - 04:25 PM, said:

Where are the wildlife biologst studying the chupacabra at, How many citizen science study the chupacabra with sound science methods and back ground? Any biobiltz going on where the sightings are from ? No study, no body, no evidene of cource we can relay on chance but then our knowledge of the local wildlife will remain inconplete.

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I totally get what you are saying.  However, it doesn't take a concerted effort of any kind for dead animals to turn up.  Especially if supposedly Chupas are dinosaurs held over from prehistoric times.  a dead one would have been found at some point, with or without anybody actively looking for it.  Just because our knowledge of a locality's flora and fauna is incomplete doesn't give anyone license to claim that fantastic animals exist simply based on that.  Lack of evidence cannot be used as evidence itself.


#32    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 04:52 PM

View Postorangepeaceful79, on 15 December 2012 - 04:42 PM, said:

I totally get what you are saying.  However, it doesn't take a concerted effort of any kind for dead animals to turn up.  Especially if supposedly Chupas are dinosaurs held over from prehistoric times.  a dead one would have been found at some point, with or without anybody actively looking for it.  Just because our knowledge of a locality's flora and fauna is incomplete doesn't give anyone license to claim that fantastic animals exist simply based on that.  Lack of evidence cannot be used as evidence itself.
I don't know if chupacabras exist or don't exist it up to the scientific method and proccess to detemine that. There are litteraly thoudsand of new and rediscovered animals that that are discribed on living species and not found remains. I agree we should never claim a cryptid exist it is cryptozoology job to prove or disprove if a cryptid is a real animal, misidentified animal, or just folklore. What I was trying to say is if we don't look we will never be able to detemine the true identification of a cryptid. With lack of funds available for scientific reasrch such unanwered question relay on citizen science to either prove or disprove if a cryptid is real.

We know almost exactly how many stars exist in our milkway but we have no idea of how many species living on our plant.

#33    Overdueleaf

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 05:09 PM

View PostJeff Albertson, on 15 December 2012 - 04:52 PM, said:

What I was trying to say is if we don't look we will never be able to detemine the true identification of a cryptid. With lack of funds available for scientific reasrch such unanwered question relay on citizen science to either prove or disprove if a cryptid is real.

Relying on citizen science is exaclty the reason why we will never have the existance of a cryptid proven... there are just too many factors that get overlooked with most people relying on anecdotal evidence as real/true evidence rather than something concrete... even a body would eventually have to be turned over to mainstream scientists to study........ so i pose a question.. should people really be concerned with trying to prove or disprove the existance of a cryptid when their claims/evidence is scrutinized/not taken seriously/overlooked and chalked up to being what it is.. citizen science

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#34    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 05:50 PM

View PostOverdueleaf, on 15 December 2012 - 05:09 PM, said:

Relying on citizen science is exaclty the reason why we will never have the existance of a cryptid proven... there are just too many factors that get overlooked with most people relying on anecdotal evidence as real/true evidence rather than something concrete... even a body would eventually have to be turned over to mainstream scientists to study........ so i pose a question.. should people really be concerned with trying to prove or disprove the existance of a cryptid when their claims/evidence is scrutinized/not taken seriously/overlooked and chalked up to being what it is.. citizen science

Intresting question, of curuise my personal beleive is people should realy be concered with trying to prove or disprove the existence of a cryptid. Claims need to be scrutinized that how we improve are knowledge one way or the other as shown how forms like this and others are best used. To gain knowledge and better ideas on topic at hand. With claims not taken serously that up to people who are intrested in cryptozoology we need to apply scientific methods and principles, I can name a few cryptids and investigators, who resarch and techniques are well with in psedo-science. Or how hoaxes and bad science has caused cryptozoology to remain a laughing stock that some people are affraid to be associated with Jeff Albertson is comic book guys real name the picture with the name I currentl go to school trying to earn a degree in biology, I do think that anomalies that are reconized with in fields of study will be sooner or latter solved. As not having a reputation with in the scientific community and finding cryptozoology as intresting I use a fake name. I don't want to be associated with people claims set in psedo-science. Funding for science is low so politics come in play, when applying for grants, who would want there name associated with what people look at what is nothing more than psedo-science. But that what science is the search for the truth, what can be more exsiting than to experience let alone solve a true unknown question.  I think if we keep the words of Fox Mulder in mind when making any claim in cryptozoology we can improve how people look at cryptozoology "Don't write this book. You'll perform a disservice to a field of inquiry that has always struggled for respectability." (The X-files season 3, Jose Chung's From outerspace.) For some examples look at all the attention that Dr. mebulms study as brought, people want to know the truth but bad psedo-science like that (No evidence, No discovery.) is what is hurting this field. Known hoaxers are still looking for evidence tom Biscardii to name one why aren't they runed out of this field. Look at people looking at consently at rummors Robert Lindyas blog to name one.

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#35    Hawkin

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 06:07 PM

Interesting. If humans can evolve from ape-like characteristics it's possible that Dinos could evolve as well.

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#36    TroodonMan56

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:55 PM

Well, if Chupacabras aren't Troodons, is it possible for any animal related to Troodon to be alive today?


#37    Overdueleaf

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 11:43 PM

View PostTroodonMan56, on 20 December 2012 - 10:55 PM, said:

Well, if Chupacabras aren't Troodons, is it possible for any animal related to Troodon to be alive today?

that depends on if you think birds are descended/evolved/shared a common ancestor from/with dinosaurs....pick your wording of choice....but a full fledged dinosaur remnant/living fossil... i am not holding my breath

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#38    ReaperS_ParadoX

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:55 PM

View PostJeff Albertson, on 15 December 2012 - 04:57 AM, said:

Here is a website there is some good pictures (ignore the first picture) of the blue dogs http://www.chupacabrasightings.com/ they are not chupacabras but do to media hype got lumped in as chupacabras they are not a cryptid.
So there wild dogs then not pets?

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#39    Einsteinium

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 07:12 PM

View PostTroodonMan56, on 13 December 2012 - 04:29 AM, said:

I have come up with an idea that Chupacabras might be descendants of the dinosaur Troodon. And this is why I believe so:


I think the Chupacabras’ origin is a lot more complicated than what most people think, and I will explain why. In 1995, a horror movie had just come out in theaters, and this film is probably behind the sightings of the alien-like creatures, as Benjamin Radford correctly pointed out a few years back. However, this cannot explain the dead animals.
My opinion is that the animals most likely died from mundane reasons, such as disease. I do think that Chupacabras are real animals. However, I do not think that they are responsible for the dead and mutilated corpses that were found.
What do I think the Chupacabra is? I do not think it is a dog, and I also don’t think it’s an alien, a shapeshifter from another dimension, or any of that stuff. Instead, I have come up with an idea that, in my opinion, neatly explains the sightings. I am inclined to think that the Chupacabra sightings are most likely caused by an undiscovered species of bird-like reptile.
Reports and references to animals resembling the Chupacabras have been around since long before 1995. In the 1970′s, sightings of an animal resembling a large bipedal reptile were reported by farmers. And the ancient Native American civilizations which lived in Latin America many centuries ago have legends of creatures similar to those sighted nowadays.
There were also many legends about feathered serpents.
I think that a Troodon or one of its relatives managed to survive the Mass Extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period, and evolved into a Chupacabra. I am aware that this idea may sound very far-fetched, and that many people will probably disagree with me. However, I will now explain why I think so.
Back in the mid-1990′s, 2 distinct types of Chupacabras were most-commonly sighted by eyewitnesses. One of them was the alien-like creature, which I think was probably misidentification on the witnesses’ part, caused by seeing that sci-fi movie.
However, the other type of sighting was of a bipedal creature with sharp fangs, sharp claws on its hands and feet, large, egg-shaped eyes, and feathers. This creature was often sighted at night, which means it is probably nocturnal. When all of these characteristics are put together, it reminds me of a certain genus of dinosaur, which lived at the end of the Cretaceous period: Troodon.
Troodons were likely nocturnal, and they also had large eyes, sharp claws and teeth. They are now also believed to have been covered in feathers, since they were closely-related to birds. Also, of all the dinosaurs besides birds that were living at the time, Troodons were probably the most likely (or the least unlikely!) to survive the K-T extinction event. This is for several reasons; It is now widely believed that an asteroid hitting the Earth was the cause of the Extinction. When this asteroid struck, it caused particles of dust to go into the air, and surround the Earth. When this happened, sunlight could not reach through, so the entire planet became cold and dark. Most of the dinosaurs could not adapt to these new conditions, so they died out.
However, Troodon was different. First of all, it wasn’t very large, compared to the other dinosaurs. And most of the animals which survived the extinction were small to medium-sized. Second of all, it had large eyes, and it was nocturnal, which meant that it could probably live well in the dark. Third of all, it was well-adapted to surviving in cold climates. This is because it was warm-blooded, and had feathers for insulation against the cold. Also, fossils of Troodon have been found in Alaska, and paleontologists have evidence that they probably lived there year-round, which means that they had no problem surviving the tough Alaskan winters. Fourth, it was a very adaptable dinosaur. Dinosaurs similar to Troodon survived for 20 million years, and they lived from Alaska all the way down South to Mexico. Troodons were also omnivores, which meant that they were not picky eaters. Therefore, if they could find no prey, they probably could have survived on plants, and vice versa.
So if a small population of Troodons had survived the extinction, and survived until now in remote areas where fossilization was unlikely, I guess it isn’t really that far-fetched to extrapolate that they might still be alive now, and that they might be responsible for at least some of the Chupacabra sightings.
Also, several eyewitnesses have reported seeing spikes that stick up on the creature’s back. Troodon might be able to make its feathers erect, and stand up stiff. To an inexperienced witness, if viewed from far away, these could probably be easily mistaken for spikes, on its back.
So, this is my hypothesis. I realize that it isn’t perfect, and I am not certain that it is true, of course. However, I think that it does a pretty good job, overall, of explaining the Chupacabras phenomenon. So, what does everyone else think about my idea?

I have to point out that during the late cretaceous the earth was much warmer than it is today with tropics extending extremely far north. Alaska would have been tropic to sub-tropic and so your suggestion that it was adapted for cold weather at that time is flawed.


#40    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 07:14 PM

View PostR4z3rsPar4d0x, on 21 December 2012 - 06:55 PM, said:

So there wild dogs then not pets?

Yes some just being coyote with mange if I rember right there was one that was a hybrid of coyote and wolf. The so called chupacabras in the unites states of america were just media hype and misidentification.

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#41    DieChecker

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 09:04 PM

Didn't the original Chupacabras descriptions actually have spines on them and not feathers?
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#42    Jeff Albertson

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 11:05 PM

View PostDieChecker, on 23 December 2012 - 09:04 PM, said:

Didn't the original Chupacabras descriptions actually have spines on them and not feathers?
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Yes they did have spines and not feahers as can be clear heared in Jon Dowens coined decribtion of the chupacabra -  "Sonic the hedge hogee on acid" to destinguise them from the blue dog sightings.

We know almost exactly how many stars exist in our milkway but we have no idea of how many species living on our plant.




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