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World's oldest flowing water discovered

timmins mine copper zinc water

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34 replies to this topic

#31    goodgodno

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 08:33 PM

The teaching seems very different to Durham?? You got that from our conversation?  Ok, so not only did I study geology and hydrogeology (I don't really think environmental geoscience is a fair comparison, unless your integrated masters is more related) but most of what I have discussed has come directly from my working experience in Australia, the middle east, Europe and the UK.  It is converstations like this I realise I am just speaking to a student.

I went to Birmingham University if you must know.  Pretty prestigious, however I have the life experience to realise that there is more to just a degree.  Hence why I don't really care where you did your degree.  We employ people from lesser universities just because we prefer their attitude and experience.

However, I do wish you the best of luck for your future career despite our clear differences.


#32    Setton

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 09:09 PM

View Postgoodgodno, on 22 May 2013 - 08:33 PM, said:

The teaching seems very different to Durham?? You got that from our conversation?  Ok, so not only did I study geology and hydrogeology (I don't really think environmental geoscience is a fair comparison, unless your integrated masters is more related)

Perhaps if you looked into what environmental geoscience is, you'd understand the comparison. Effectively, it's the same as Durham's geology course but with less focus on structural geology and mineralogy and more focus on hydrology, chemistry and pollution. My entire dissertation was related to water systems and the chemistry of them. The masters year is an extension of the same but more specialised (so no looking at rocks at all and just your own research interests).

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but most of what I have discussed has come directly from my working experience in Australia, the middle east, Europe and the UK.  It is converstations like this I realise I am just speaking to a student.

I went to Birmingham University if you must know.  Pretty prestigious, however I have the life experience to realise that there is more to just a degree.  Hence why I don't really care where you did your degree.  We employ people from lesser universities just because we prefer their attitude and experience.

Obviously in life, there is more to employability than just a degree. Given that this conversation started as a result of you attempting to correct a very basic statement, however, it seems pertinent to know which university doesn't even teach simple water chemistry as part of its geology course. I looked at Birmingham's geology course myself. Obviously it might have changed since you were there but these days they have one module lasting one semester on hydrology. I had one in my first year, one in second and two in my third year (plus dissertation). So that's 6 modules, each lasting two semesters on water and its properties or 12x the content at Birmingham. So forgive me if I'm a little skeptical when you try to correct a very simple statement.

Your attempts to play the experience card really just show the holes in your understanding. Given that we're dealing with basic chemistry, any experience beyond some study isn't really relevant. If anything, it sounds like your work has geared you to the understanding necessary for the job. There's nothing wrong with that and I'm sure it's more useful than sticking strictly to the scientific facts. Nevertheless, the original statement that water is created and destroyed all the time is, scientifically, true. No amount of work experience, mines dug or water polluted will change that.

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However, I do wish you the best of luck for your future career despite our clear differences.

Thank you. I wish I could say the same but I just can't support mining companies. I'm sorry. It would make a mockery of everything I've studied.

'Good' is not the same as 'nice'.
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#33    goodgodno

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 09:45 PM

Unfortunately for you, an understanding of structural geology is critical to hydrogeology.  Particuarly in mining environments since most mineralisation of ore is enriched with the aid of fluid flow through fractures.  Rarely does a mine present itself with a homogenous porous aquifer, unless your dealing with commodities such as Uranium sandstone deposts which have formed in palaeochannels, or boring quaries.  Well done on the "12x" statement, it just goes to show how much growing up you have to do, I guess you missed my masters in hydrogeology when summing that up.

I agreed with you, scientifically.   All you said was "dissolve anything in water and thats gone" was a misleading comment.  Afterwards you suggests reactions such as pyrite oxidation, for which I again agreed with you, scientifically speaking.  I am just looking at the bigger picture, which when dealing with large groundwater problems is essential.

If you feel that way about mining maybe you should reconsider using that laptop you are writing this on, turn off your fridge freezer, stop driving your car, the list goes on.  You are being a massive hypocrite.  If you truly knew about modern day mining and the practices involved you would know that things are now different, and people like me actually do things in the most environmental friendly way possible.

I'm not going to comment any longer, otherwise we could go on and on.


#34    Setton

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 09:55 PM

View Postgoodgodno, on 22 May 2013 - 09:45 PM, said:

Unfortunately for you, an understanding of structural geology is critical to hydrogeology.  Particuarly in mining environments since most mineralisation of ore is enriched with the aid of fluid flow through fractures.  Rarely does a mine present itself with a homogenous porous aquifer, unless your dealing with commodities such as Uranium sandstone deposts which have formed in palaeochannels, or boring quaries.  Well done on the "12x" statement, it just goes to show how much growing up you have to do, I guess you missed my masters in hydrogeology when summing that up.

As you plainly missed my masters...

I repeat, given that the original disagreement is not about mining, all the knowledge of mines in the world doesn't change the basic chemistry.

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I agreed with you, scientifically.   All you said was "dissolve anything in water and thats gone" was a misleading comment.  Afterwards you suggests reactions such as pyrite oxidation, for which I again agreed with you, scientifically speaking.  I am just looking at the bigger picture, which when dealing with large groundwater problems is essential.

Which wasn't the point being discussed...

No wonder we seem to be at cross-purposes.

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If you feel that way about mining maybe you should reconsider using that laptop you are writing this on, turn off your fridge freezer, stop driving your car, the list goes on.  You are being a massive hypocrite.

Solar power, wind power and I don't drive, genius.

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If you truly knew about modern day mining and the practices involved you would know that things are now different, and people like me actually do things in the most environmental friendly way possible.

As for hypocrisy, don't claim to be doing things the environmentally friendly way when you're ripping stuff out of the ground. I'm still waiting to hear of these remediation techniques you're employing...

My comment and apology before were genuine. If you were in pretty much any other field, I would wish you the best of luck with your career. But I just can't. I think the nearest I can get is:

I hope the company you work for goes bankrupt and collapses but you instantly find equally gainful employment in another field.

Edited by Setton, 22 May 2013 - 09:56 PM.

'Good' is not the same as 'nice'.
'No, murder is running your broadsword through someone because he worships a different God to you... Or is that evangelism? I get confused.'
When they discover the centre of the universe, a lot of people are going to be disappointed - They are not it.
I don't object to the concept of a deity but I'm baffled by the notion of one that takes attendance.

#35    alibongo

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 09:41 PM

I've got a diploma in Swimming, so you can't tell me anything about water!

Edited by alibongo, 23 May 2013 - 09:41 PM.






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