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Secret treasure in Great Pyramid awaits


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#16    Geladius

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 03:41 PM

Not sure why Zahi Hawass is used for legitimate research. With his anti-Semitic comments and that stupid show he did for the History channel where he treated it like the Apprentice.


#17    Tutankhaten-pasheri

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 04:11 PM

View PostGeladius, on 09 June 2013 - 03:41 PM, said:

Not sure why Zahi Hawass is used for legitimate research. With his anti-Semitic comments and that stupid show he did for the History channel where he treated it like the Apprentice.
As I said, Hawass on TV is a horror show, but he is not a complete bozo about AE, he does actually know what he is doing. As for anti-semitic remarks, well, he is an Egyptian Muslim, I would say such comments are not so unusual and have no relation to his ability to do his work. I am no Hawass fan-boy, but there seems nobody else at this moment to do what he did.


#18    Geladius

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 05:23 PM

View PostTutankhaten-pasheri, on 09 June 2013 - 04:11 PM, said:

As I said, Hawass on TV is a horror show, but he is not a complete bozo about AE, he does actually know what he is doing. As for anti-semitic remarks, well, he is an Egyptian Muslim, I would say such comments are not so unusual and have no relation to his ability to do his work. I am no Hawass fan-boy, but there seems nobody else at this moment to do what he did.

Might be right about the fact it's probably more common in egypt for those remarks. How ever I look at it more that it kind of shows possible bias in findings. I'm sure there are better options, but perhaps he's simply just popular among the Egyptian people to choose otherwise. I just see him as a media hog personally.


#19    pallidin

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:54 PM

I suppose(without knowledge) that a full archeaological exploration of the Great Pyramid, would involve techniques that the nation of Egypt would not agree to. And that, of course, is their full right.

Perhaps in the future technological advances(reasonably non-destructive) can make such exploration agreeable to the Egyptian government.

Edited by pallidin, 09 June 2013 - 06:55 PM.


#20    moonshadow60

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 10:28 PM

I haven't seen much of Dr. Hawass on television, but what I have seen makes me think he has the kind of big personality that Egypt needs to bring back the almighty tourist dollar.


#21    atomk12

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 08:05 AM

The Egyptian government was so busy blocking archaeologists from accessing the treasures of Egypt, they didn't stop to think it would kill the interest in seeking anything in that region. Now I wonder how much they are paying this guy to speak publicly.


#22    Swede

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 12:40 AM

View Postatomk12, on 11 June 2013 - 08:05 AM, said:

The Egyptian government was so busy blocking archaeologists from accessing the treasures of Egypt, they didn't stop to think it would kill the interest in seeking anything in that region. Now I wonder how much they are paying this guy to speak publicly.

Congratulations. You would appear to have expressed a profound lack of understanding in regards to modern archaeological practices.

Edit: Terminology.

Edited by Swede, 12 June 2013 - 12:42 AM.


#23    Roybat

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 01:06 AM

View Postpallidin, on 08 June 2013 - 05:32 PM, said:

Yeah, I previously read the article and have always considered the following to be a major point of interest:

The shafts with copper handle "doors", apparently not found in the other pyramids. Those doors are very small, of course.

"There is no pyramid of the 123 pyramids in Egypt that have these type of doors with copper handles," he added. "Really, I believe they're hiding something."
   Copper handles ?    or copper  electrical contacts


#24    DieChecker

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 01:20 AM

Yeah. Maybe this is like Tomb Raider and we just need to touch the handles with a 9 V battery and they will slide to the side and the golden boogie will fall into our hands....

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#25    kmt_sesh

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 02:24 AM

Zahi on television is usually a disaster. Chasing Mummies is glaring proof of that. Thank goodness that idiotic show is dead and gone. And Zahi in popular-peridiocal interviews is nearly as bad. It seems when Zahi opens his mouth for the sake of unfiltered, unedited content, about 75% of what he says is rubbish. If not outright offensive.

The anti-semitic remarks were unacceptable. He was caught in the act, and worse yet, he was a high-ranking government official—so what he was saying could've been misconstrued as an official Egyptian government statement. Egypt continues to maintain a peaceful but tenuous relationship with the state of Israel, so Hawass's remarks were plain reckless. That many Muslims in the Middle East feel this way toward Israel is no secret to anyone, but aside from religious fanatics and other Muslims who continue to live with a medieval mindset, most Muslims are enlightened enough to remain civil and keep it to themselves.

I once read an interview in which he flat-out stated that only wealthy tourists should visit Egypt. In a recent interview with Smithsonian magazine, Hawass declared that his fellow Egyptians don't know how to deal with democracy and need a dictatorship. While this is sadly true for many Middle Eastern states, Hawass does not speak for all of his fellow Egyptians. He makes any number of statements based on personal beliefs and opinions, and he seems to think his personal beliefs and opinions are shared by everyone.

It's important to understand that while Hawass has indeed returned to Egypt, he no longer holds any governmental position, nor does he hold any job or office of authority. He's more or less on equal footing with any run-of-the-mill academic. That he might return to some position in the Egyptian antiquities department can be debated, although I personally consider it unlikely. Hawass was too closely aligned with the Mubarak regime, regardless of how much he professes otherwise. We'll see what the future might bring—and who knows what that might be?—but don't mistake Hawass's return to Egypt with his return to authority. He has no authority.

On the flip-side, it's always amused me how the fringe crowd (including here at UM) loves to vilify Hawass. They always have, continue to do so, and probably always will. The fringe likes to paint Hawass as some sort of boogyman and enjoys using him as a whipping-boy, but on average fringies have very little understanding of how archaeology is actually conducted and how it is administered through government agencies. Highly amusing is the fringe's misguided delusion that Hawass controlled everything with an iron fist and determined the course of all archaeological activities and research pursuits in the country of Egypt. This was always a comically misdirected exaggeration.

I've noted through the years the way in which fringies tend to point everything at Hawass and obsessively record and remember every word he's ever said, as though Hawass were the end-all and be-all of Egyptology. He certainly is not. Based on my own experience in Egyptological research and studies, I have to admit that I wouldn't even place Hawass in the top ten of Egyptologists whose work has pointed us in a learned direction in recent decades.

On a final note, however, I'd wager very few (if any) of those who like to vilify Hawass are the least familiar with his body of published material. Hawass conducted a lot of high-quality, contributive research on the peer-reviewed level, above and beyond the many (if not too many) books he published for a popular audience. In other words, when it comes to Egyptology, Hawass has always been a top-notch historian and researcher. He just needs to avoid the TV camera and the pen and pad of magazine and newspaper interviewers—which of course will never happen. No one can deny Hawass's burgeoning ego and obsession for the limelight. Sadly, it will always be detrimental to his career.

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#26    kmt_sesh

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 02:25 AM

View PostSwede, on 12 June 2013 - 12:40 AM, said:

Congratulations. You would appear to have expressed a profound lack of understanding in regards to modern archaeological practices.

Edit: Terminology.

LOL A lot of that flinging off the walls at UM. Always has been, so remember to duck!

Nice to see you again, Swede.

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#27    Swede

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 12:16 AM

View Postkmt_sesh, on 27 June 2013 - 02:25 AM, said:

LOL A lot of that flinging off the walls at UM. Always has been, so remember to duck!

Nice to see you again, Swede.

Chuckle! Given the mass density reflected in some circumstances, a helmet may be more suitable.

Also good to see you again. As with yourself, time has been rather a valuable commodity of late.

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#28    gOOgLer

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 07:48 PM

I am sure Dr. Hawaz wil find 5,000 years old microwave owen inside the Keops Pyramide. :-)


#29    FLOMBIE

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 07:53 PM

View PostHilander, on 08 June 2013 - 12:44 PM, said:

I'm sure there are more discoveries to be made like under the sphinx.  Considering how things are going in Egypt I don't expect there will be much tourism until things improve.
Best time to go there (if you are a bit of an adventurer). I know a guy who went there just after the revolution, and he was basically alone in the Valley of the Kings, with a couple of tour guides very much taking care of him.


#30    cladking

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 12:38 AM

View Postkmt_sesh, on 27 June 2013 - 02:24 AM, said:

Zahi on television is usually a disaster. Chasing Mummies is glaring proof of that. Thank goodness that idiotic show is dead and gone. And Zahi in popular-peridiocal interviews is nearly as bad. It seems when Zahi opens his mouth for the sake of unfiltered, unedited content, about 75% of what he says is rubbish. If not outright offensive.

The anti-semitic remarks were unacceptable. He was caught in the act, and worse yet, he was a high-ranking government official—so what he was saying could've been misconstrued as an official Egyptian government statement. Egypt continues to maintain a peaceful but tenuous relationship with the state of Israel, so Hawass's remarks were plain reckless. That many Muslims in the Middle East feel this way toward Israel is no secret to anyone, but aside from religious fanatics and other Muslims who continue to live with a medieval mindset, most Muslims are enlightened enough to remain civil and keep it to themselves.

I once read an interview in which he flat-out stated that only wealthy tourists should visit Egypt. In a recent interview with Smithsonian magazine, Hawass declared that his fellow Egyptians don't know how to deal with democracy and need a dictatorship. While this is sadly true for many Middle Eastern states, Hawass does not speak for all of his fellow Egyptians. He makes any number of statements based on personal beliefs and opinions, and he seems to think his personal beliefs and opinions are shared by everyone.

It's important to understand that while Hawass has indeed returned to Egypt, he no longer holds any governmental position, nor does he hold any job or office of authority. He's more or less on equal footing with any run-of-the-mill academic. That he might return to some position in the Egyptian antiquities department can be debated, although I personally consider it unlikely. Hawass was too closely aligned with the Mubarak regime, regardless of how much he professes otherwise. We'll see what the future might bring—and who knows what that might be?—but don't mistake Hawass's return to Egypt with his return to authority. He has no authority.

On the flip-side, it's always amused me how the fringe crowd (including here at UM) loves to vilify Hawass. They always have, continue to do so, and probably always will. The fringe likes to paint Hawass as some sort of boogyman and enjoys using him as a whipping-boy, but on average fringies have very little understanding of how archaeology is actually conducted and how it is administered through government agencies. Highly amusing is the fringe's misguided delusion that Hawass controlled everything with an iron fist and determined the course of all archaeological activities and research pursuits in the country of Egypt. This was always a comically misdirected exaggeration.

I've noted through the years the way in which fringies tend to point everything at Hawass and obsessively record and remember every word he's ever said, as though Hawass were the end-all and be-all of Egyptology. He certainly is not. Based on my own experience in Egyptological research and studies, I have to admit that I wouldn't even place Hawass in the top ten of Egyptologists whose work has pointed us in a learned direction in recent decades.

On a final note, however, I'd wager very few (if any) of those who like to vilify Hawass are the least familiar with his body of published material. Hawass conducted a lot of high-quality, contributive research on the peer-reviewed level, above and beyond the many (if not too many) books he published for a popular audience. In other words, when it comes to Egyptology, Hawass has always been a top-notch historian and researcher. He just needs to avoid the TV camera and the pen and pad of magazine and newspaper interviewers—which of course will never happen. No one can deny Hawass's burgeoning ego and obsession for the limelight. Sadly, it will always be detrimental to his career.

I had no idea.  I assumed you were exaggerating about the quality of this show.  I couldn't
believe anything could be so bad but now I've seen the show and ity seems more that you
were sugar coating the truth and using polly anna goggles.  This thing (especially episode 2)
has some of the funniest stuff ever caught on film.  These guys make the Keystone Cops
look like the Harlem Globetrotters.  A mummy has little to fear from these stumble bums but
every mommy and daddy does.  In the first episode someone gets trapped so people rush in
with no tools and no first aid.  In the second a man's back goes out and there is a repeat but
this time an older overweight and clautrophobic producer goes in with no equipment but a ra-
dio. Hawass' treatment of people is despicable in the extreme.  Even animal reflexes are suf-
ficient cause for him to lose his temper and destroy the career of a young woman. He has the
gull to lambast a man for simply suggesting that aliens could have been invoilved and imposes
his religion on all.  His religion is unique to himself as he says the pyramid is sacred.  The run
emotions inspired by this film is extensive and it probably affected me much more than most be-
cause of my perspective but it was simply hilarious.  At the end he says he's unilaterally closing
the pyramid because his handheld hygrometer said the humidity in the enclosed relieving cham-
bers with  several people in it at 76% and that humidy causes salt!!!

I know this is just a film but it still leaves me shaken. I wonder if it any of it is real. God help us all.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.




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