Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Valles Marineris, the result of an impact?


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:34 AM

Posted Image

http://en.wikipedia....alles_Marineris


There's another theory about the formation of the Valles Marineris:


In summary, the following elements fit into a complete picture consistent with the hypothesis that Valles Marineris on Mars is a canyon formed by the grazing impact of a population of former moonlets of Mars:


*-There has been an excess of objects striking the Martian surface at angles of less than 15 degrees. Such an excess implies a former population of orbiting objects.

*-VM lies near the Martian equator.

*-VM is oriented parallel to the equator.

*-VM was formed from west to east; that is, in a direction prograde with respect to the planet's rotation.

*-The highest surface features in the equatorial region of Mars are the Tharsis volcanoes to the immediate west of VM.

*-Multiple parallel troughs suggest multiple moonlet impacts, or multiple fragments from one moonlet.

*-The sculpted or "wrinkle ridge" appearance inside the canyons is consistent with the roll of an irregular-shaped asteroid.

*-Phobos will follow precisely this scenario when it decays onto Mars in 40 million years.


http://metaresearch....esMarineris.asp


I wonder what that event could have done to the former atmosphere of Mars, and its water.

To give you an idea: the Chicxulub crater was formed by an object of 10 km (6 miles), similar to the size of Phobos and Deimos. Now imagine a series of similar impacts.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 23 January 2013 - 09:44 AM.


#2    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:51 AM

What I am suggesting is that both Mars' water and atmosphere have been blasted from its surface.

The general idea is that Mars' core solidified, the magnetic field disappeared, and thus the atmosphere was no longer protected from radiation, and escaped into space, including the water.


#3    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:27 PM

I had expected one of the resident geniuses would have posted their expert opinion about this, but apparently I was wrong.


#4    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 31,812 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:54 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 13 June 2013 - 07:27 PM, said:

I had expected one of the resident geniuses would have posted their expert opinion about this, but apparently I was wrong.
Well it such a ridiculous idea, lacking in evidence or common-sense that it really deserved no comment.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#5    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 31,812 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:15 PM

However as you have bumped this topic let's see how your idea fares shall we?

Instead of the normal circular or oval shape produced by normal impacts your impactor managed to gouge out a valley 4,000 km long (nearly a 5th of the way around the planet). Rather than vaporise instantly, the usual fate for impacting bodies, yours only disintegrating at the very end of a 4,000 km journey despite the enormous kinetic energy which would have been release upon initial impact.

It managed to produce a valley 200 km wide, suggesting a huge impact, but only 7 km deep.

The impactor not only managed to do this but it magically followed the curvature of Mars for the full 4,000 km.

This magic impactor, for an encore, managed to do all this with out leaving any evidence that the Valles Marineris had been subjected to great heat (you would expect the rock to melt with such a large impact) nor did it produce any ejecta which is generally associated with large impacts.

Whilst doing all of these things it managed to produce numerous side channels.

Now aren't you glad you brought this topic back from it's (merciful) early demise?

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 13 June 2013 - 08:18 PM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#6    keithisco

keithisco

    Majestic 12 Operative

  • Member
  • 5,700 posts
  • Joined:06 May 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rincon de Loix, Benidorm

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:28 PM

I think the Tharsis Montes Volcanoes point to the real genesis of the Valles Marinaris. Tectonic. Why would anyone want to apply a totally ludicrous theory to an event that is well described in Earth Geology?


#7    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:31 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 13 June 2013 - 07:54 PM, said:

Well it such a ridiculous idea, lacking in evidence or common-sense that it really deserved no comment.

It was nothing but an idea.

I am not defending some religion, ok?


#8    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:33 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 13 June 2013 - 08:15 PM, said:

However as you have bumped this topic let's see how your idea fares shall we?

Instead of the normal circular or oval shape produced by normal impacts your impactor managed to gouge out a valley 4,000 km long (nearly a 5th of the way around the planet). Rather than vaporise instantly, the usual fate for impacting bodies, yours only disintegrating at the very end of a 4,000 km journey despite the enormous kinetic energy which would have been release upon initial impact.

It managed to produce a valley 200 km wide, suggesting a huge impact, but only 7 km deep.

The impactor not only managed to do this but it magically followed the curvature of Mars for the full 4,000 km.

This magic impactor, for an encore, managed to do all this with out leaving any evidence that the Valles Marineris had been subjected to great heat (you would expect the rock to melt with such a large impact) nor did it produce any ejecta which is generally associated with large impacts.

Whilst doing all of these things it managed to produce numerous side channels.

Now aren't you glad you brought this topic back from it's (merciful) early demise?

I AM glad I brought it up, and from what you posted I understand you also don't have any idea how it was formed or could have been formed.

But I am glad you tried anyway.


#9    keithisco

keithisco

    Majestic 12 Operative

  • Member
  • 5,700 posts
  • Joined:06 May 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rincon de Loix, Benidorm

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:34 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 13 June 2013 - 08:15 PM, said:

However as you have bumped this topic let's see how your idea fares shall we?

Instead of the normal circular or oval shape produced by normal impacts your impactor managed to gouge out a valley 4,000 km long (nearly a 5th of the way around the planet). Rather than vaporise instantly, the usual fate for impacting bodies, yours only disintegrating at the very end of a 4,000 km journey despite the enormous kinetic energy which would have been release upon initial impact.

It managed to produce a valley 200 km wide, suggesting a huge impact, but only 7 km deep.

The impactor not only managed to do this but it magically followed the curvature of Mars for the full 4,000 km.

This magic impactor, for an encore, managed to do all this with out leaving any evidence that the Valles Marineris had been subjected to great heat (you would expect the rock to melt with such a large impact) nor did it produce any ejecta which is generally associated with large impacts.

Whilst doing all of these things it managed to produce numerous side channels.

Now aren't you glad you brought this topic back from it's (merciful) early demise?

..and lets not forget Waspie that somehow, this "impact" left the raised mountain chain in the centre of the Valles Marinaris (entirely consistent with the Mid Atlantic Ridge that we see on Earth as a result of Tectonic spreading)


#10    keithisco

keithisco

    Majestic 12 Operative

  • Member
  • 5,700 posts
  • Joined:06 May 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rincon de Loix, Benidorm

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:37 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 13 June 2013 - 08:34 PM, said:

..and lets not forget Waspie that somehow, this "impact" left the raised mountain chain in the centre of the Valles Marinaris (entirely consistent with the Mid Atlantic Ridge that we see on Earth as a result of Tectonic spreading)

Any problem with that hypothesis Abramelin?



#11    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:42 PM

I have no problem with any hypothesis.

But we should agree no one really knows how it was formed.

I had to tickle someone's nerve (and not necessarily Waspie's) to finally have someone respond.

Now, is that ridiculous or not?


#12    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:48 PM

View Postkeithisco, on 13 June 2013 - 08:34 PM, said:

..and lets not forget Waspie that somehow, this "impact" left the raised mountain chain in the centre of the Valles Marinaris (entirely consistent with the Mid Atlantic Ridge that we see on Earth as a result of Tectonic spreading)

A raised mountain is not anywhere the same as a ridge running along the entire globe (Earth).


#13    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:56 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 13 June 2013 - 08:15 PM, said:

However as you have bumped this topic let's see how your idea fares shall we?

Instead of the normal circular or oval shape produced by normal impacts your impactor managed to gouge out a valley 4,000 km long (nearly a 5th of the way around the planet). Rather than vaporise instantly, the usual fate for impacting bodies, yours only disintegrating at the very end of a 4,000 km journey despite the enormous kinetic energy which would have been release upon initial impact.

It managed to produce a valley 200 km wide, suggesting a huge impact, but only 7 km deep.

The impactor not only managed to do this but it magically followed the curvature of Mars for the full 4,000 km.

This magic impactor, for an encore, managed to do all this with out leaving any evidence that the Valles Marineris had been subjected to great heat (you would expect the rock to melt with such a large impact) nor did it produce any ejecta which is generally associated with large impacts.

Whilst doing all of these things it managed to produce numerous side channels.

Now aren't you glad you brought this topic back from it's (merciful) early demise?

The numerous side channels could have been formed much later.

It followed the curvature of Mars because it rolled and bumped along it surface for a short time. Just my idea.

We have no idea about the composition of the (huge) impactor, so we also don't know how it would have been able to carve out the valley like it maybe did.

Ejecta? How can you be sure there were not any?

They may still be floating around in the Solar System.

.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 13 June 2013 - 09:03 PM.


#14    StarMountainKid

StarMountainKid

    Cheese

  • Member
  • 3,778 posts
  • Joined:17 Feb 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Star Mountain, Corporate States of America

  • We have problems because we stray from what is innocent and pure.

Posted 14 June 2013 - 04:10 PM

Quote

Until now, Earth was thought to be the only planet with plate tectonics. But a huge “crack” in Mars’ surface — the massive Valles Marinaris — shows evidence of the movement of huge crustal plates beneath the planet’s surface, meaning Mars may be showing the early stages of plate tectonics. This discovery can perhaps also shed light on how the plate tectonics process began here on Earth.
http://www.universet...tonics-on-mars/

I'm no resident genius, just thought I'd post and alternate explanation.

The acceptance of authority does not lead to intelligence.
A mind untouched by thought...the end of knowledge.
My credentials: http://www.unexplain...ic=87935&st=225

#15    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,089 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 14 June 2013 - 07:37 PM

View PostStarMountainKid, on 14 June 2013 - 04:10 PM, said:

http://www.universet...tonics-on-mars/

I'm no resident genius, just thought I'd post and alternate explanation.

I am not either, and what you posted/linked to is what is now believed to be the most accepted IDEA (and nothing more than that).

Btw: did you read the comments?

If it was a continental rift, where are those continents?


The idea that I linked to in the opening post is just another idea, because no one really knows what caused the formation of the Valles Marinaris.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users