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Ancient Egyptian necklace found in Siberia


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#16    Abramelin

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:56 PM

View PostAtentutankh-pasheri, on 05 February 2013 - 02:14 PM, said:

Daily Mail account is stolen from English edition of Siberian Times. Here is link to original article, and is more imformative.
http://siberiantimes...siberian-grave/

This is about her being a virgin:

'The Chultukov Log necropolis also has a collection of elaborate hair pins, decorated with griffins, wolves and solar symbols.These pins not only carried the information about the mythology of that time, but signalled the status of the person. All hair pins were found in hairdos of married women.

'Our lady didn't have one. It's very interesting, though I can't say it definitely meant that she was a virgin'.

So it had nothing to do with the conclusion of a forensic anthropologist.

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Edited by Abramelin, 05 February 2013 - 02:56 PM.


#17    TheSearcher

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:52 AM

View Postkmt_sesh, on 04 February 2013 - 11:26 PM, said:

It's a huge stretch in the first place to call these "Egyptian" beads. I've viewed hundreds if not thousands of examples of Egyptian jewelry myself, and these don't look particularly Egyptian in style to me. Glass manufacturing was certainly being done in the timeframe quoted in the article (c. 400 BCE) but the same sort of glasswork was being done at that time all over the Mediterranean world. I am not as well versed in the cultures of that timeframe in Europe, but it would be reckless to dismiss the possibility of a European origin, as far as that goes.

In the 15th century BCE, extensive glass production was occurring in Western Asia, Crete and Egypt, you are correct. However glass making grinded to a halt during what is called the Bronze Age collapse and It picked up again in its former sites, in Syria and Cyprus, in the 9th century BCE. As to in Egypt in particular, it did not revive until it was reintroduced in Ptolemaic Alexandria, which was around 350BCE, if memory serves.

In all honesty the glass doesn't look particularly Egyptian, nor is there any particular evidence it actually came from there. Seen how glass making was rather spread all over the mediteranian, it could have come from anywhere really.

View PostSimbi Laveau, on 04 February 2013 - 11:41 PM, said:

I was waiting for you to chime in !
I was wondering how I could know more than real live archeologists ,but it doesn't look Egyptian at all .

Same idea here lol

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#18    Everdred

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 06:00 PM

It seems like these are "eye beads", which were widely manufactured in the Near and Middle East at the time in question.  Here are some examples from 4th-century Persia:

Posted Image

Given that the Persians had conquered well into Central Asia (followed by the Macedonians), it's easy to imagine the necklace being traded with neighboring Scythians, and eventually making its way to more distant Scythians in the Altai Mountains.


#19    TheSearcher

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:24 PM

View PostEverdred, on 06 February 2013 - 06:00 PM, said:

It seems like these are "eye beads", which were widely manufactured in the Near and Middle East at the time in question.  Here are some examples from 4th-century Persia:

Posted Image

Given that the Persians had conquered well into Central Asia (followed by the Macedonians), it's easy to imagine the necklace being traded with neighboring Scythians, and eventually making its way to more distant Scythians in the Altai Mountains.

As trade objects that makes perfect sense, probably quite valuable at the time too.

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