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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#10636    Knul

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 05:59 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 March 2012 - 05:49 PM, said:

Yeah, I thought this was a bit more of a realistic translation.

And the OLB uses 2 words for clouds: "wolka" & "wolkum".

.

singular wolk plural wolka after prepositions or genitive pural  wolkum.

like

singular svn plural svna after prepositions or genitive plural svnum

however

forms on -um are frequently mis-used as nominative plural.


#10637    Abramelin

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 06:09 PM

View PostKnul, on 09 March 2012 - 05:59 PM, said:

singular wolk plural wolka after prepositions or genitive pural  wolkum.

like

singular svn plural svna after prepositions or genitive plural svnum

however

forms on -um are frequently mis-used as nominative plural.

Agreed.

And if a "hulk" indeed descended from the Greek "holkas" (or the other way round), then it might have looked like this replica:

Posted Image

http://kypros.org/Oc...Cyprus/kyrenia/

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

http://www.specialty...s.net/eop7.html


#10638    Abramelin

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 07:19 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 March 2012 - 06:09 PM, said:

Agreed.

And if a "hulk" indeed descended from the Greek "holkas" (or the other way round), then it might have looked like this replica:

Posted Image

http://kypros.org/Oc...Cyprus/kyrenia/

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

http://www.specialty...s.net/eop7.html


The OLB text was about Min-erva, aka Nyhellenia or better known as "Nehalennia".

Now look at how she is often being depicted:

Posted Image

She has her left foot on the prow of a ship, not on a cloud...


.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 March 2012 - 07:20 PM.


#10639    Van Gorp

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:40 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 March 2012 - 06:09 PM, said:

Agreed.

And if a "hulk" indeed descended from the Greek "holkas" (or the other way round), then it might have looked like this replica:

Posted Image

http://kypros.org/Oc...Cyprus/kyrenia/

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

http://www.specialty...s.net/eop7.html


Yep, picture seems a Holle Aak to me.


#10640    Abramelin

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:46 PM

View PostVan Gorp, on 09 March 2012 - 08:40 PM, said:

Yep, picture seems a Holle Aak to me.

Sorry to disappoint you, but "aak" has an altogether different etymology.

The original word happens to be one that starts with an -N-  (like "nako"):

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/aak1

And I know you will 'love' this:

Some people think that the name Nehalennia is derived from the Hebrew words ‘nahal’, meaning to guide and ‘aniah’ meaning ship. This would indicate the meaning to be ‘guide the ship’, i.e. he who guides the ship(s).

http://www.neeltjeja...gin-of-the-name

:P

But if the name is indeed of Semitic origin, it is most probably a Phoenician word; the Hebrews were not known to be sailors.

I have read here and there that the Phoenician and Hebrew languages were very close.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 March 2012 - 09:06 PM.


#10641    The Puzzler

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 05:54 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 March 2012 - 07:19 PM, said:

The OLB text was about Min-erva, aka Nyhellenia or better known as "Nehalennia".

Now look at how she is often being depicted:

Posted Image

She has her left foot on the prow of a ship, not on a cloud...


.
Yes, she does, the hull.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#10642    Abramelin

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 11:36 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 10 March 2012 - 05:54 AM, said:

Yes, she does, the hull.

That's because I searched rather quickly and could not find the pic where you only see the prow.

But whatever part of the ship is visible, it still is a ship.

I had expected at least someone to say that a possible connection with the Greek word "holkas" would be 'another' proof of the OLB...

.

Edited by Abramelin, 10 March 2012 - 11:38 AM.


#10643    Van Gorp

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 11:43 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 March 2012 - 08:46 PM, said:

Sorry to disappoint you, but "aak" has an altogether different etymology.

The original word happens to be one that starts with an -N-  (like "nako"):

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/aak1

And I know you will 'love' this:

Some people think that the name Nehalennia is derived from the Hebrew words ‘nahal’, meaning to guide and ‘aniah’ meaning ship. This would indicate the meaning to be ‘guide the ship’, i.e. he who guides the ship(s).

http://www.neeltjeja...gin-of-the-name

:P

But if the name is indeed of Semitic origin, it is most probably a Phoenician word; the Hebrews were not known to be sailors.

I have read here and there that the Phoenician and Hebrew languages were very close.


.

Not realy disappointed here -> So good news :-)
I really love those 'original' words starting with an 'N' and the 'possibles' in official etymologie.

So ape probably comes from nape?  From there to the word na-apen! LOL

Other possibility:
'Nako' and 'deN ake' could share the same etymological story as Nineve and "deN In-Heve" or "N'in heve" :-)  
But true, den ake could be a misspelling of den naak :-))

Serious, I don't have much to do with Hebrew/Phoenicians, so I don't know much about it/them.  
But I know not every single people/language on earth is a deravation of them.  
I admit, in that sense I'm a heretic and non-believer.

As long as official etymology can't give a good explanation of the meaning and origin of 'Rome' i don't bother too much with all their other fairy tales.
But thnx for sharing this info.

Edited by Van Gorp, 10 March 2012 - 11:46 PM.


#10644    Otharus

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 06:46 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 10 March 2012 - 11:43 PM, said:

Serious, I don't have much to do with Hebrew/Phoenicians, so I don't know much about it/them.  
But I know not every single people/language on earth is a deravation of them.  
I admit, in that sense I'm a heretic and non-believer.

As long as official etymology can't give a good explanation of the meaning and origin of 'Rome' i don't bother too much with all their other fairy tales.
:lol:
I join your club, Van Gorp.


#10645    Abramelin

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 10:19 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 10 March 2012 - 11:43 PM, said:

Not realy disappointed here -> So good news :-)
I really love those 'original' words starting with an 'N' and the 'possibles' in official etymologie.

So ape probably comes from nape?  From there to the word na-apen! LOL

Other possibility:
'Nako' and 'deN ake' could share the same etymological story as Nineve and "deN In-Heve" or "N'in heve" :-)  
But true, den ake could be a misspelling of den naak :-))

Serious, I don't have much to do with Hebrew/Phoenicians, so I don't know much about it/them.  
But I know not every single people/language on earth is a deravation of them.  
I admit, in that sense I'm a heretic and non-believer.

As long as official etymology can't give a good explanation of the meaning and origin of 'Rome' i don't bother too much with all their other fairy tales.
But thnx for sharing this info.

Whoever in this thread said or even suggested that every single people/language on earth is a derivation of Hebrews/Phoenicians?

But people travel and leave words and customs where they stay longer than a day.

Most probably you will have no problms with the fact that many Dutch nautical terms ended up in other languages, like English, German, and Russian.

So why should it be a problem if Hebrew/Phoenician words/names ended up in the Netherlands?


#10646    Abramelin

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 10:25 AM

Van Gorp, this guy is even better than you: he explains every word on the planet, from every language, by hacking the words to pieces and then change the pieces into complete Basque words, and finally makes up a sentence that 'explains' the word:

http://www.faculty.u...nze/nylink2.htm

http://www.faculty.u...ol/odysseus.htm


#10647    Otharus

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 03:51 PM

Posted Image


#10648    Otharus

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 04:43 PM

Posted Image

Posted Image

See you there, or not.


#10649    Abramelin

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 06:35 PM

View PostOtharus, on 11 March 2012 - 04:43 PM, said:

Posted Image

Posted Image

See you there, or not.

If I have enough finances (but I don't count on it), you will see me there. Would be great to see you, Knul, Van Gorp, and maybe even Puzzler from Australia, Cormac from the USA, Swede from Sweden (??), and of course Alewyn from South Africa (assumimg you have invited all of them too).

Bickering on the internet about some topic is peanuts, but seeing eachother face to face would be great.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 11 March 2012 - 06:45 PM.


#10650    Otharus

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 06:53 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 11 March 2012 - 06:35 PM, said:

Bickering on the internet about some topic is peanuts, but seeing eachother face to face would be great.
Yes, that would be great.

I will invite the paper-research group too, including dr. Jensma.

Let's work on summarizing our theory, whoever has one.